#2
Don't normally do these but I just clicked any old shit
Quote by lambofgod127
btw im in hs and im almost 18 so if u do think she was flirting with me dont say that its wrong im almost a grown man.




༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽ WE ARE ROB ༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽
#6
Quote by JimmyCraig
I'd do it but I'm a noob at this stuff. I just buy what my ears like


well that's the idea, i wanna find out what people's opinions are and what they prefer
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#7
Done!
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


People
should
smile
more



crit4crit on 'acoustic 1 (with piano)' here



Rate my playing skills please.
#8
Done
Quote by Joss_Frusciante
They have my vote!

Quote by final-andy
And my axe!
#10
done.
:
"Stop shooting me!!!GAHHHH!!!"
<(0_0<(>0_0)> FU
^(0_0)^^(0_0)^ Sion
(>0_0)><(0_0< HA!!!
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#11
My answer for pretty much all of the multiple choice questions are that I wouldn't use any of those options. Also this is weird:

that is the aim of this questionnaire – to find out what peoples' opinions on electronic instruments and amplifiers are.


What does the question about the origin of acoustic guitars have to do with that?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#13
Quote by theogonia777
What does the question about the origin of acoustic guitars have to do with that?

Acoustic guitars were invented for power cuts!
#14
Ugh, do I need to say I would use an BC Rich for anything?
I would use it, if it was the only guitar available, for whatever type of music I wanted to play, regardless of it's spiky styling. And all the while I'd be looking forward to picking up one of my own guitars.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#15
Quote by whoomit
Acoustic guitars were invented for power cuts!


He asked where they came from, which is "grandpas' attics."

I think that's the correct answer anyway.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Jan 8, 2013,
#16
My answer for the 'origin of acoustic guitar' question;


Do you know where the acoustic guitar came from?

I do. Y'see, the guitar is an ancient instrument which has been evolving into the form we recognise today for millennia - since man first discovered that strings stretched to different tensions would produce different pitches.

The word “guitar” can be traced back to the Ancient Greek “kithara”, which was a type of lyre (a harp like, non fretted folk instrument), however the shape is likely to have developed in the middle ages from various European the Oud and Lute - a plucked, fretted instrument with a small enough to be held in the player’s hands. The guitar first appeared in a form that would be recognisable today in 15th century Spain and was called the “vihuela”. Unlike the Lute it had a round back and was curved inwards on each side much like a modern acoustic guitar, but like many stringed instruments of the renaissance period the vihuela’s twelve strings were separated into pairs (or courses) that were most often tuned to the same pitch (or an octave below) like a modern 12 string guitar or a mandolin - pairing strings gave the instrument more volume as well as creating interesting chorus effect.

The earliest guitar, for which collections of music began to be published around Europe in the second half of the 16th century, is relatively small compared to the vihuela and had only four courses of strings which were higher pitched. One of those collections refers to the guitar as “nothing but a vihuela shorn of its first and sixth strings”, but the diverging repertoire of the instruments suggests that the guitar had developed its own identity and place in society, its smaller range lending itself to simpler music accompanying songs while the vihuela was the preferred choice for more elaborate music.

In the early 17th century the popularity of the guitar spread across Europe, which could be attributed to the two new and easily accessible methods of learning simple strumming and chord patterns which were published, independently, by the pedagogues Jaun Carlos Amat and Fransisco Palumbi. The popularity of Palumbi’s “alfabeto” chordal system - based on learning chords by the letters of the alphabet - led to guitars being designed specifically for strumming simple dance rhythms.

An additional course of strings was added to the instrument as players tried to deal with it’s musical limitations, and the period also saw a burgeoning demand for more complex guitar music - a demand met by highly influential composers such as Giovanni Paolo Foscarini, who mixed the combined the simple “alfabeto” strumming with lute-like plucked passages, and Francesco Corbetta, who was perhaps the most influential guitarist, tutor and composer in the baroque period who impressed the British and French aristocracy with his virtuosic performances and taught many of the future greats of classical guitar - ensuring the popularity of the guitar in Europe for centuries to come. Although the guitar was fast becoming the favourite instrument of the European nobility it was still considered the instrument of the common man in Spain and a guitar could usually be found in barbers’ shops and taverns for patrons who wanted to strum a chord and sing a song - German musicologist and composer noted that it was played by “comedians and buffoons only for accompaniment to Villanelles and other foolish low songs.”

By the late 18thth century many luthiers had begun building guitars with single strings (as opposed to pairs) and with an extra bass string (the six stringed guitar has remained the standard ever since) in response to changing requirements of performers and composers - the wild harmonies and jangling sounds easier on guitars with paired strings, which worked well for the contrapuntal music of the baroque period, became redundant in the classical and romantic movements. Guitar music in the classical period was dominated by the prolific composer and expressive performer Fernando Sor, who was described as “the Beethoven of the guitar” by the contemporary Belgian musicologist François-Joseph Fétis and hailed by musicians of the period as the greatest guitar player in the world. His works are still widely published and peformed to this day.

The beginning of the 19th century saw an artistic movement known as romanticism sweep across Europe. Composers of romantic music attempted to be more expressive, passionate and musically unpredictable (using chromaticism, rubato, unexpected modulation and making use of the full, lush sounds of the expanding romantic orchestra) than those of the classical period, who most often stuck rigidly to the established rules of harmony and counterpoint. Undoubtedly the two most important masters of guitar in this period were Francisco Tárrega and and Antonio Torres - Tárrega a master composer and Torres a master luthier. Tárrega, like Sor a century before him, was hailed by his contemporaries as a compositional genius (described as the “Chopin of the guitar&rdquo as well as guitar unparalleled virtuoso, whose then-unusual technique has become the norm for classical guitarists and who is responsible for much of the modern classical guitarists repertoire, as well as the Nokia ringtone (an excerpt from his piece Gran Vals). His sound was enhanced by the revolutionary guitars that he played, which were built by fellow Spaniard Antonio Torres. Less concerned with elaborate decoration and intricate inlays than his predecessors, Torres focused on creating the most powerful, rich tone he could from his instruments, increasing the body size and depth and using a different, lute-inspired, construction (fan bracing) and different woods for the tops of his guitars which accentuated the harmonic richness of notes without jeopardising the structural integrity of the instrument under the pressure of the strings. Almost all classical/Spanish guitars produced today, 120 years after his death, are practically identical - to the untrained eye at least - in constriction and aesthetics to the guitars Torres built.

The Pursuit of Volume;
The early 1900s saw several important developments in guitar building in America. Guitars had been a part of American folk music since the first waves of Spanish immigrants hundreds of years prior, but remained a background instrument due to a lack of volume compared to the fiddle or banjo, however several luthier were working to address this problem by experimenting with metal rather than gut strings. One innovator was the New York born Orville Gibson, who founded the Gibson Guitar Corporation in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Gibson had success with his revolutionary design for flat backed, arch-top mandolins, inspired by European violin builders - making them louder, more comfortable, less fragile and easier to produce - and later went on to apply these design concepts to his guitars, which had arched tops and steel strings (one of the first steel-strung guitars available) as well as being considerably larger than any of his competitors designs for a louder, richer sound. The Gibson L-5, a large bodied arch top with f-holes rather than a circular sound hole, became the standard guitar for rhythm guitarists in big band jazz such as Eddie Lang as well as county artists like Maybelle Carter.

The Pennsylvania based workshop C.F. Martin & Company, founded in 1833 by German immigrant Charles Frederick Martin Sr., were one of the most important innovators in the ‘western’ style steel strung acoustic guitars. Although not the first to offer steel strings, their unique ‘x-bracing’ construction made for a far stronger guitar that would prove to be able to withstand the pressure of metal strings and would be widely replicated. Another innovation from Martin guitars came during the great depression when, in a bid to appeal to banjo pickers looking for more work, they created a new model with 14 frets (rather than 12) clear of the neck to extend the playing range of the guitar. In 1931 they reintroduced (having been first developed in 1916 without success) a 14th fret version the Dreadnought model guitar which was larger and deeper bodied than other acoustic guitars being built at the time - the new shape was louder and more bassy, becoming popular first with bluegrass musicians and has since become the most common shape of acoustic guitar.

Perhaps the most radical redesign of the acoustic guitar came in the form of the resonator guitar. After a request from lap steel player George Beauchamp (who would later co-found the electric guitar company Rickenbacker) looking to be heard over the brass section in his Hawaiian band, John Dopyera (who would later form the Dobro Manufacturing Company with his brothers) designed an acoustic guitar that had a metal cone (resonator) on its top rather than a sound hole and had a body made of metal rather than wood. The experiment proved highly successful and these new and surprisingly loud guitars became the standard guitar for Hawaiian-style slide players of the time and has since become a popular choice for folk and delta blues musicians.

And I have a few hundred words about the electric guitar, too, but you only need the first half of this essay.

Quote by theogonia777
My answer for pretty much all of the multiple choice questions are that I wouldn't use any of those options. Also this is weird:


What does the question about the origin of acoustic guitars have to do with that?

Maybe the other questions were to throw us off the scent that he was just wanting help with an essay about the acoustic guitar? In which case we've fallen right into the trap...
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Jan 8, 2013,
#18
Quote by Shotgunmerc
BC Rich is used for Jazz, right?

That's what I said
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#19
Quote by Shotgunmerc
BC Rich is used for Jazz, right?


BC Riches are used for pop. Pop stars wear hot pink and neon green; BC Riches come in hot pink and neon green. Pop stars wear oddly shaped clothes; BC Riches are oddly shaped. Pop stars are weird looking; BC Riches are weird looking. Pop music was played by Poison; BC Riches were played by Poison. Pop music is created by evil wizards and requires child sacrifices to produce; BC Riches are created by evil wizards and require child sacrifices to produce.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#21
BC Rich is used for pop and what the frig is an 'acoustic guitar'?
Quote by lambofgod127
btw im in hs and im almost 18 so if u do think she was flirting with me dont say that its wrong im almost a grown man.




༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽ WE ARE ROB ༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽
#22
Quote by slash_GNR666
what the frig is an 'acoustic guitar'?


He means the grandpas' guitars. They are only played by grandpas, Southern people, forest people, mountain people, hermits, hermit crabs, girls, and weenies, so most people have never heard of them.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#23
Quote by theogonia777
He means the grandpas' guitars. They are only played by grandpas, Southern people, forest people, mountain people, hermits, hermit crabs, girls, and weenies, so most people have never heard of them.


But you have?!
#24
Quote by UnmagicMushroom
But you have?!


I am a forest person, a mountain person, a hermit, and a girl.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#25
Quote by theogonia777
BC Riches are used for pop. Pop stars wear hot pink and neon green; BC Riches come in hot pink and neon green. Pop stars wear oddly shaped clothes; BC Riches are oddly shaped. Pop stars are weird looking; BC Riches are weird looking. Pop music was played by Poison; BC Riches were played by Poison. Pop music is created by evil wizards and requires child sacrifices to produce; BC Riches are created by evil wizards and require child sacrifices to produce.


Ohhhhhhhh....thanks for clearing that up