jkizzle
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
174 IQ
#1
Whats the best way to get better at soloing? I want more speed but also an easy way to go beond the regular pentatonic and get all over the fret board
Geldin
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2008
1,677 IQ
#2
That's a really, really broad question.

Don't worry about building speed. Worry about making relaxation and economical motions habit. The secret to speed is small, relaxed movements.

As for breaking out of the pentatonic box, I'd recommend learning some basic theory. Learn your major and minor scales, especially how to construct them and which intervals are most consonant and dissonant (which will factor into how you phrase things).

The most important aspect of writing and playing solos, in my mind, is to learn to listen analytically to the music you're hearing. Basically, you want to be able to listen to a passage, envision a melodic line on top of it, and then reproduce that melodic line. Start trying to pay more attention to what you're playing when in a passage and how those notes interact with the ones around them.
InfiniStudent
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2008
11 IQ
#4
Quote by Geldin
Basically, you want to be able to listen to a passage, envision a melodic line on top of it, and then reproduce that melodic line. Start trying to pay more attention to what you're playing when in a passage and how those notes interact with the ones around them.

+1 Nice, Geldin!

One ways I used to do this is:
listen to my backing progression and the "window of time" I am trying to fill, I loop it, and then I Sing different melodic lines until I have one that sounds cool - Then I figure out how to play it on guitar (adding in embelishment techniques for color/texture like unison bends, octave intervalling, slides, etc)

Eventually as you get more experienced, you will learn how to "Sing" directly through your guitar without this extra vocal step. But using your voice just takes all the technique out of the way and lets you focus on what Geldin said - Feeling!

Happy Jammin!
dietermoreno
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
1,413 IQ
#5
Quote by jkizzle
I want more speed


(1) Practice.

(2) Learn how to play scales.

(3) Consider sweep picking and cross picking.


Quote by jkizzle
I want to go beyond the regular pentatonic


See step (2).
Last edited by dietermoreno at Jan 16, 2013,
chainsawguitar
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2009
47 IQ
#6
Quote by InfiniStudent
+1 Nice, Geldin!

One ways I used to do this is:
listen to my backing progression and the "window of time" I am trying to fill, I loop it, and then I Sing different melodic lines until I have one that sounds cool - Then I figure out how to play it on guitar (adding in embelishment techniques for color/texture like unison bends, octave intervalling, slides, etc)

Eventually as you get more experienced, you will learn how to "Sing" directly through your guitar without this extra vocal step.


This!

Also, if you want to be able to solo over the whole neck, I suggest learning a scale (start with the pentatonic scale, if you like) over the whole neck. You can then use each shape individually (there are 5 shapes) to solo ONLY in that shape.

That's a great exercise to get you used to different areas of the fretboard and different parts of each scale. You can then repeat this exercise with any other scale you learn.
Steyr9001
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
534 IQ
#7
For playing all over the neck, improvising with a scale on a single string seriously helped me out. Once you're comfortable moving up and down the neck while still being able to play cleanly and fluidly, add another string.

It's a pretty simple exercise, but it actually ended up helping me in a lot of other ways as well. It's improved my knowledge of the fret board, helped me to view scales outside of the typical box patterns, and improved my improvisation and playing in general.

6 strings are complicated, 1 string is simple.