#1
Hello,
I am learning a slow sweep that is around 64BPM. I am new to sweeping, and I am wondering how long it'll take me to be able to play the sweep in full speed. the sweep looks like this:
------17-13-----------------------------17-17-13----16----
--------------15---------------------15------------------------
------------------14-------------14----------------------------
----------------------15-----15--------------------------------
--------------------------17------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------

And also, how long will it also take me to be able to play 150bpm sweep?

thanks.
#2
Impossible question to answer. It all depends on how easy you learn things, how much you will train sweeppicking, how much you will train other things that will aid you with the sweeppicking and so on and so on.
#3
If you're practising this sort of thing, make sure you do it in some kind of rhythm, like sextuplets. Otherwise it won't mean anything, musically.

Do you know what it is that you're sweeping there? if I said Dm arpeggio, would you know what I'm on about?

What I mentioned above, about sextuplets, do you know what they are?

How long? Music isn't a competition.
#4
When I decided to work on my sweeping for real, it took me about a week to get decent at sweeping (I was learning Afterlife solo by A7X).
But, eventually, you can never be good enough at anything, there's always better.
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#5
Hint: Put a hair tie around the guitar neck to mute the strings a little. That's if you want the easy way out, but plenty of people do it when recording.

To answer your question though...
As long as it takes my friend. I was lucky and got it quick and good at 5-6 strings sweeps (Protest the hero - Sequoia throne was my first) pretty fast, but I do generally have problems with 2-4 stringers just because I don't practice or even use them often enough. To be honest the problem I find I have the most is just remembering the patterns if they are interchanging all the time. I have that problem with all music though, I have a horrible memory.
Last edited by Mr.-Bungle at Jan 13, 2013,
#6
well you are not awesome then are you? I'm joking!!!
If you are new to sweeping, why don't you star of with 3 string sweeping slowly, and then build the speed, then add 5 string sweeping?
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#7
How long is a piece of string? It takes as long as it takes, don't try to rush it and don't be disheartened if you don't get it as fast as someone else.
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#8
Quote by ibrahimasood
well you are not awesome then are you? I'm joking!!!
If you are new to sweeping, why don't you star of with 3 string sweeping slowly, and then build the speed, then add 5 string sweeping?


I don't think that's a brilliant way to approach it, personally. To me at least, that puts up a kind of mental barrier where you start telling yourself that bigger sweeps are harder.

These kind of problems are as much to do with you thinking where the limits of your abilities are, as much as they are any technique or amount of practicing. If you start thinking that something like a 5 string sweep is harder than a 3 string sweep, you have already introduced some difficulties with bigger sweeps before you've even attempted them. If you think something is difficult, you'll be making it a lot harder than it needs to be. Sure, it might not be easy to begin with, but these things don't need making any more difficult. I hope that makes sense, I'm not very good at wording things sometimes.

If I could offer any advice, it would just be relax. Like someone has already said, music isn't a competition - Don't fall into the trap of wanting to play faster than everyone else, or rushing yourself to play fast. I know it's the last thing you want to hear, TS, but just take it slowly and don't rush yourself - there is no magical technique or exercise that anyone can give you that will help. Keep focused on it, and eventually you will get there.
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#9
Quote by Ringo86
Impossible question to answer. It all depends on how easy you learn things, how much you will train sweeppicking, how much you will train other things that will aid you with the sweeppicking and so on and so on.


+1
Dario Hooker Di Marco
#10
Quote by Mr.-Bungle
Hint: Put a hair tie around the guitar neck to mute the strings a little. That's if you want the easy way out, but plenty of people do it when recording.

Don't do this when you're learning the technique. It'll keep you from learning proper muting. Most artists who use sweep picking with a lot of gain will use a hair tie or something similar in studio, but that's not because they can't sweep without it (more because it cuts down the risk of screwing up a perfect take with one off note)

To answer your question though...
As long as it takes my friend. I was lucky and got it quick and good at 5-6 strings sweeps.

This is actually the best way to learn sweeping, in my opinion. Learning sweeping with larger arpeggios (5-6 strings as opposed to 3-4 string patterns) will give you more practice on the sweeping motion, which is where people get sloppy. The turn around at the top and bottom of each arpeggio is usually hammered on or pulled off, so a longer arpeggio gives you more sweeping action, which in turn gives you more practice with muting.
#11
It depends on your technical skill, playing ability, and your practice habits. That said, either way, it will take you days or weeks to truly learn it. You won't know you've truly learned it until you can confidently run through it even if it's been hours, days, or weeks since you've practiced.

So go with the flow, keep at it, and be ready to enjoy that amazing, out of the blue, I've got this down feeling soon
Anthony at Guitar Strings and Beyond
#12
Ok, thanks guys, foolish of me :P.

I don't know what Dm arpeggio is, as said by mdc. Neither as what a sextuplet is.

I can do 3 strings really good, I just can't do 4-6. I can't keep both hands in sync.
But yeah, i know, practice.
#13
Quote by TheNameOfNoone
When I decided to work on my sweeping for real, it took me about a week to get decent at sweeping (I was learning Afterlife solo by A7X).
But, eventually, you can never be good enough at anything, there's always better.


Impossible to get "decent" after a week of those sweeps. I'm positive they're rolls and playing rolls CLEAN is significantly harder than a standard shape like the one OP showed.

Either you've been playing guitar a long long time to be able to play those sweeps clean after a week or you just weren't playing them clean.

I have a huge respect for anyone who can play high speed rolls. It's ****ing hard.


On topic of TS's question though, it's not a question you can answer. It all depends on the time and effort you put in. It's not like grinding your hero to a certain level in world of warcraft. You can't estimate how long it's gonna take.
Last edited by vayne92 at Jan 14, 2013,
#14
Quote by awesomealvin
I don't know what Dm arpeggio is, as said by mdc. Neither as what a sextuplet is.


You should learn, if you ask me knowing what both of those are is much more important than learning to sweep is.
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#15
Quote by awesomealvin
Ok, thanks guys, foolish of me :P.

I don't know what Dm arpeggio is, as said by mdc. Neither as what a sextuplet is.

I can do 3 strings really good, I just can't do 4-6. I can't keep both hands in sync.
But yeah, i know, practice.

Impression received after reading this; Amount of fucks given by TS = 0
#16
Quote by awesomealvin

I don't know what Dm arpeggio is, as said by mdc. Neither as what a sextuplet is.

If you don't know what an arpeggio or sextuplet is, I recommend you shelf sweeping for a while. Learn about basic chord structure and note groupings, as those will serve you a lot better than any facility of technique.
#17
Just depends on how much you practice and how quickly you learn (everyone is different). Just don't give up and you'll get it!
#20
It's impossible for anyone to judge it will take you, to improve. Jazz III picks with improve your sweep picking.
#21
Quote by awesomealvin
Hello,
I am learning a slow sweep that is around 64BPM. I am new to sweeping, and I am wondering how long it'll take me to be able to play the sweep in full speed. the sweep looks like this:
------17-13-----------------------------17-17-13----16----
--------------15---------------------15------------------------
------------------14-------------14----------------------------
----------------------15-----15--------------------------------
--------------------------17------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------

And also, how long will it also take me to be able to play 150bpm sweep?

thanks.


This is worth looking at

The Correct Mechanics of Sweep Picking

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phMUH6gkAMw

from about 3:15 to 6:30 he talks about fretting lighter at a comfortable speed rather than trying to speed up
#22
Quote by SP1N3SPL1TT3R
It's impossible for anyone to judge it will take you, to improve. Jazz III picks with improve your sweep picking.

Um no. Jazz III's are a favorite of many guitarists, myself included, but that has nothing to do with sweeping. It's whatever pick you're comfortable with that will make the difference.

TS, as Zaphod and Geldin already said, there are more important things to learn that sweeping.
Quote by Geldin
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#23
Quote by Mr.-Bungle
Hint: Put a hair tie around the guitar neck to mute the strings a little. That's if you want the easy way out, but plenty of people do it when recording,

Don't. You should NOT take shortcuts in your technique, ever. I learned that the hard way through years of focusing too much on jamming and playing random crap, rushing things up to tempo before I was ready for them, and not enough focus on how to play cleanly and properly. Once you reach a situation where your technique doesn't work or is sloppy and you can't play something as a result, then you are ****ed because you won't just need to learn something new, but un-learn years of bad habits.

Using little tricks like that in recording situations where you have to be as perfect as possible, once you have already learned how to perform the technique correctly, is fine. Don't do it while you're learning, or developing, or practicing. You'll save some producer a headache when they have to start recording your songs bar-by-bar and mashing 100 takes together just to get you to sound good, when it comes time to record your album.

Personally I have been practicing sweep picking on and off for years, however, over the last month or so I have been practicing about 2 hours of it a day, sometimes more. Since then I have got to the point where the sweeping motion feels natural and my coordination is pretty good, up to playing 16th notes at about 160 bpm. I can't sweep crazy-fast, not yet, but give me a few months and I might be there.

Sweeping is one of those techniques where if you don't have an absolutely flawless and analytical practice routine, and don't spend hours and hours on the absolute basics (pick angle, coordination, finger muting technique), you will learn it wrong. Protip: sloppy sweep picking sounds crappy, and a lot of the people I know who say they can do it actually suck at it precisely because they rushed themselves (and require huge amounts of gain etc. to cover up errors). I'm pretty determined to not make those same mistakes.

Quote by wiggedy
This is worth looking at

The Correct Mechanics of Sweep Picking

I watched that video a while back and it really did wonders for my technique. Highly recommended you practice that (the "sit down and watch TV while sweeping for hours and hours so you don't go insane" tip is also a good one).
Last edited by sea` at Jan 19, 2013,
#24
Quote by sea`
I watched that video a while back and it really did wonders for my technique.



Good to see, I have been working on getting a lighter touch rather than trying to go faster.

He also says (it may have been in another video) be sure to maintain your picking hand when speeding up. In other words if you pick from the wrist when playing slowly, make sure you are doing the same thing when you speed up. Just another simple thing which has also helped me heaps.
#25
Quote by wiggedy
Good to see, I have been working on getting a lighter touch rather than trying to go faster.

He also says (it may have been in another video) be sure to maintain your picking hand when speeding up. In other words if you pick from the wrist when playing slowly, make sure you are doing the same thing when you speed up. Just another simple thing which has also helped me heaps.

Yep, that was a nightmare to get down and the single biggest obstacle. After many, many weeks of practice however, it should start to feel natural. I have even started to incorporate sweep/economy-style picking into my regular playing solely by proxy.
#26
Quote by sea`
Yep, that was a nightmare to get down and the single biggest obstacle. After many, many weeks of practice however, it should start to feel natural. I have even started to incorporate sweep/economy-style picking into my regular playing solely by proxy.


Good to see it all working for you, very encouraging!
Last edited by wiggedy at Jan 19, 2013,
#27
Quote by wiggedy
Good to see, I have been working on getting a lighter touch rather than trying to go faster.

He also says (it may have been in another video) be sure to maintain your picking hand when speeding up. In other words if you pick from the wrist when playing slowly, make sure you are doing the same thing when you speed up. Just another simple thing which has also helped me heaps.


Hey guys thx for checking out my youtube video .From my experience with correct practise it takes about a year to be fairly decent at sweeping.Be sure though you have the mechanics of the motion down perfectly orelse you are getting better at perfecting...mistakes.

Want proof? make a person that is halpf assing his sweeps to do it painfully slow.he CANT do it(even if he is sort of doing it faster).Why? cause he never sat down to analyze every detail of the motion and just strums with the right hand hoping the left somehow ll follow and be synced in time.It rarely happens this way.Watch my video again and again and be sure you are following to the letter.Then its just a matter of time....
#28
Well, keep practicing until you get it. It'll take a shorter amount of time if you get off UG and go back to practicing it. :P
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