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robbit10
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#1
I was researching "how to compose film score music" when I came across a video on YouTube, in which some guy had a list of chord progressions that sounded good, in roman numeral format. At first, I thought "what a cheater", because he used a preset list of progressions. But then he started playing, and I recognised many of the chord progressions as the ones that made the most emotional impact on me in any song.
Here's that video, by the way:
Warning: This video is very long and only shows 5 chord progressions, and will most likely be a waste of your time.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxAKHebFpD8

Then I realised that he had a very veritable tool in his hands: A palette from which to pick, based on the mood you want the song to express, and quickly write a new song (or at least the harmonic foundation).

As many know, many popular songs use specific chord progressions. These chord progressions seem to trigger something in people. The Axis of Awesome demonstrated it very well with their Four Chords song. The progression of which goes like this:
I - V - VI - IV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOlDewpCfZQ

It's been overused (mostly in pop songs), but by using this, the song gets a certain emotional quality that I don't quite know how to explain.

Same goes for this:
VI - IV - I - V

Let me just say that I don't plan to become an unoriginal musician who just uses the pop chord progressions to create instant hooks. I want to learn how to create advanced compositions, but this is a good beginning. I've heard that by taking one of these chord progressions and making certain degrees minor instead of major, or the reverse, can really make a difference. As will sharpening and flattening.

---

So now I come to the question: What makes these chord progressions have such an influence on people? Is it because they have been used many times throughout music history, and people have heard them so much that they love hearing it? Is it something about the brain, specific sequences that cause these reactions?
Last edited by robbit10 at Jan 15, 2013,
Hail
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#2
cadence

they're designed to establish significance of the tonic without the listener having to think very much and without having to deal with much legitimate tension beyond what is necessary to provide a backdrop for a simple melody.
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TheHydra
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#3
I-IV-V works because it's probably the most basic and pure example of tension and resolution you could get in a chord progression. It has a universal appeal because the brain likes the feeling of the dominant chord (V) going to the tonic (I). If you throw a vi in there, then you have a diatonic minor chord for contrast and variety.
MaggaraMarine
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#4
If you start composing, I wouldn't pick a chord progression for a start. I would try to hear something in my head. If it happens to have that ordinary four chord progression, at least it wasn't forced. When you just pick chord progressions, your songs might start sounding pretty boring and repeating themselves. Maybe try to come up with the melody first and then see what chords would fit it the best. Picking a chord progression is an easy way to make music fast but it might not sound the most original. I think that's how they make the top 10 hits.

Of course you can make the most interesting music by just picking ten chord progressions from the list. I think it's just easier to come up with something original if you don't use "good sounding chord progression" list. I would try to hear a chord progression by myself, not just pick one from the list. Also if you have a melody, you can change the chords behind it. You might make a melody to fit the ordinary four chord progression and then change all the chords and it will sound way different.
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Sleepy__Head
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#5
Quote by robbit10
What makes these chord progressions have such an influence on people?


The harmonic series.

The first three overtones in the series are:

Octave
Perfect 5th
Perfect 4th.

Other than that? Musical training and exposure to existing music. Acculturation, IOW.
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CarsonStevens
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#6
Quote by robbit10
Let me just say that I don't plan to become an unoriginal musician who just uses the pop chord progressions to create instant hooks.


I know, right? God forbid you write stuff other people will like. That's so mainstream.
robbit10
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#7
Quote by CarsonStevens
I know, right? God forbid you write stuff other people will like. That's so mainstream.

Hey, I didn't mean it like that. I simply meant that I wish to advance past the simple stuff as soon as I grasp it. I know that in music, basically almost everything's been done already (notice I say ALMOST everything). I want to add my own twists to these popular chord progressions, but I have nothing against people who use these chord progressions - they can sound quite beautiful.
Last edited by robbit10 at Jan 14, 2013,
CarsonStevens
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#8
Quote by robbit10
Hey, I didn't mean it like that. I simply meant that I wish to advance past the simple stuff as soon as I grasp it. I know that in music, basically almost everything's been done already (notice I say ALMOST everything). I want to add my own twists to these popular chord progressions, but I have nothing against people who use these chord progressions - they can sound quite beautiful.


Good attitude to have. I just get so tired of people who insist that a song is its chord progression and that nothing can be "original" unless it's in Q-sharp minor over a Hexadiddlyian scale.

Anyway, my oft-used variant is I-VI-I-V. I just keep falling back on it and I DON'T KNOW WHY.
HotspurJr
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#9
Dominic Pedler's "Songwriting Secrets of the Beatles" does a really good job of exploring a lot of the pop chord cliches (and how the Beatles varied them to big effect).
z4twenny
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#10
I guess I'm the only person on the "I'm sick of hearing unoriginal gits pump out the same 4 chords in every trite piece of overproduced cliched crap they put out" boat. That's just me though
Hail
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#11
Quote by z4twenny
I guess I'm the only person on the "I'm sick of hearing unoriginal gits pump out the same 4 chords in every trite piece of overproduced cliched crap they put out" boat. That's just me though


i prefer listening to purposely "terrible" (as in jarring, dissonant, experimental/avant garde) music than purposefully bland cadences, personally. people probably think i'm joking but litany IV (zorn) is one of my constants lately. i'm considering learning it, honestly, it's a masterpiece

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjjUveFfJsw
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z4twenny
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#12
^ I think I listened to that in different post you made, it's not my cup of absinthe but I'll give'em credit for trying something different. I guess I'm picky about my music. I'm not against using the same progressions that have been beaten to death if it supports the melody but at a certain point after its repeated the umpteenth time I always start thinking "I guess they ran out of ideas and just decided to drive this stupid thing into the earth"
Hail
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#13
another constant repost from me

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSUjs1fqm0s

very very simple progression, but it's smart enough to not need a vocal line. i mean when they added it, it added a whole new dimension but if i posted the vocalized version it'd defeat the point of highlighting the simplicity of it
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z4twenny
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#14
^ see the chord progression is fairly simple but it supports the melody which isn't overly repetitive. it creates and expands a motif which is what i like in music. i don't think thats asking too much.
20Tigers
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#15
Man that video was painful to watch.
41 minutes of rambling to give you five chord progressions.

C Am F G.
He explains C is the first (I); the Am is the the sixth (vi); then F -and he gets stuck??!! he takes 16 long seconds umming and ahhing over the F checking his keyboard and after initially saying it was the sixth he finally settles on the fourth (IV).

Oh so painful!!! When my brain has recovered I will come back and post some better strategies for understanding and coming up with interesting chord progressions.

Peace.
Si
food1010
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#16
Quote by robbit10
At first, I thought "what a cheater", because he used a preset list of progressions.
In my opinion, it has much less to do with the actual "progression" you are using than what you do with that progression, in terms of harmonic embellishments/voicings, melody, rhythm, dynamics, accents, articulation, and timbre. There's a lot more that goes into music than a set of notes/chords.

Think of music as telling a story. You can say all the words, but it doesn't really have the same impact if you speak in monotone without any rhythmic inflection or anything else to make it exciting. That's essentially the same thing as playing eighth notes up and down a C major scale over a C G Am F with no dynamics or varying articulations or anything. You could use the same exact tonal vocabulary (i.e. major scale and I V vi IV) and make a genuinely interesting tune if it's not entirely formulaic and monotonous.

After all, there's a limited amount of notes in our tuning system and a limited number of ways to combine these notes. Many simple chord progressions are used and overused simply because of how effective they are. In terms of triads, V to I is the strongest resolution, therefore it's used all the time. I try to avoid overusing that cadence in my music, but I have to acknowledge its effectiveness. Sometimes a strong resolution is just what you're hearing in a tune. It doesn't have to be a cop-out in the case that you can't come up with a better or more original cadence.

By all means if you want to challenge conventional cadences and harmonic tendencies, more power to you. However, I don't think it's worth ignoring thousands of years of musical development and experience from millions of musicians.

Your musical sound is a composite of all the music you enjoy, learn, and study. If you are drawn to music that has basic or "generic" progressions, then don't fight it. That's part of your sound before you even play anything, simply because you enjoy it.

Edit: 20T is right, that video was god awful. I only watched the first minute or so, but that dude clearly doesn't know how to speak.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jan 14, 2013,
HotspurJr
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#17
Yeah, the video is pretty terrible.

The thing is, following on what Food wrote, you can do a LOT with even something as simple as a V-I cadence. Yes, it's obvious, yes we'e heard it before. But it's powerful. How can you use that power?

If you study how great musicians have used it, you'll see that they don't IGNORE the power of the cliche, but rather they work with it, and manipulate it to their own ends.
robbit10
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#18
Quote by food1010
In my opinion, it has much less to do with the actual "progression" you are using than what you do with that progression, in terms of harmonic embellishments/voicings, melody, rhythm, dynamics, accents, articulation, and timbre. There's a lot more that goes into music than a set of notes/chords.

Think of music as telling a story. You can say all the words, but it doesn't really have the same impact if you speak in monotone without any rhythmic inflection or anything else to make it exciting. That's essentially the same thing as playing eighth notes up and down a C major scale over a C G Am F with no dynamics or varying articulations or anything. You could use the same exact tonal vocabulary (i.e. major scale and I V vi IV) and make a genuinely interesting tune if it's not entirely formulaic and monotonous.

I certainly agree with you. Yesterday, I tried messing around with some of these progressions (I used a progression harmonized from the natural minor scale, and the I - V - VI - IV from the major scale) and while the harmonic structure of the song was solid, the guitar sounded awful because my bar chords don't ring out fully and the strings need replacing, the rhythmic strumming pattern I was using was very standard (down, up down, up down up), and those two combined into a very mediocre harmony.
And coming up with a melody was a whole different story. I wanted it to be an instrumental song (since I don't sing very well). When I tried to compose melodies on my guitar, they would usually end up as mini-solos.

So I went searching the internet for inspiration and tips on how to come up with a good melody. One article told me that solo musicians who make instrumental guitar music usually aim for singing-like melodies, since there are no vocals.

I found two techniques in particular that seemed very interesting:
1) Listening to a human's speech, the rhythm of it, and the change in pitch while a person is speaking, and turning that into a melody.
2) Instead of trying to come up with a melody on the guitar, hum or sing it.
I found technique 2 worked best, because humming or singing a melody is a lot less constrained than doing it on the instrument, because distance between notes is no problem. I ended up with smoother, more natural, more melodic melodies. Do any of you guys use one of these 2 techniques, and do they work out well for you?


After all, there's a limited amount of notes in our tuning system and a limited number of ways to combine these notes. Many simple chord progressions are used and overused simply because of how effective they are. In terms of triads, V to I is the strongest resolution, therefore it's used all the time. I try to avoid overusing that cadence in my music, but I have to acknowledge its effectiveness. Sometimes a strong resolution is just what you're hearing in a tune. It doesn't have to be a cop-out in the case that you can't come up with a better or more original cadence.

V to I.. Does I to V count as well? And does V - IV - I count? Having different chords inbetween, but resolving eventually to the I? (Or the reverse, I to V)
I'm fairly new to harmony/chord theory, have recently learned how to harmonize the major scale and how to apply the roman numerals to it, but resolutions and cadences are still new to me.


By all means if you want to challenge conventional cadences and harmonic tendencies, more power to you. However, I don't think it's worth ignoring thousands of years of musical development and experience from millions of musicians.

I do want to, eventually, as soon as I grasp the most important theory concerning harmony and chords.


Your musical sound is a composite of all the music you enjoy, learn, and study. If you are drawn to music that has basic or "generic" progressions, then don't fight it. That's part of your sound before you even play anything, simply because you enjoy it.

I am mostly drawn to music like Sonata Arctica's ballads, film scores, Nightwish's ballads, Blind Guardian's ballads.. and then there's their metal songs, too, of course. All of these seem to have more complicated chord progressions than most pop songs. Especially some of Sonata Arctica's songs.

And then there's stuff like Dream Theater and Scale the Summit. Very complex, amazing musicianship, amazing melodies, amazing technique and control over their instruments. Love that kind of music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rekspyHcHGs


very very simple progression, but it's smart enough to not need a vocal line. i mean when they added it, it added a whole new dimension but if i posted the vocalized version it'd defeat the point of highlighting the simplicity of it

Wow, that song sounds amazing
Simple progression indeed, but they've done so much with it.


Man that video was painful to watch.
41 minutes of rambling to give you five chord progressions.

My apologies. I've added a warning in the starting post to make sure people know that it only teaches 5 chord progressions and is most likely a waste of time.
Last edited by robbit10 at Jan 15, 2013,
Hail
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#19
i'm kinda surprised you listen to scale the summit (and to an extent dream theater) and not haunted shores (aka periphery)
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robbit10
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#20
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i'm kinda surprised you listen to scale the summit (and to an extent dream theater) and not haunted shores (aka periphery)

I didn't know about them yet. But i'm glad you showed me! Just listened to Make Total Destroy. That rhythmic variation blew me away, and I really like the lyrics. It reminds me of Animals as Leaders and Meshuggah a bit.

EDIT: Also, their Ragnarok song.. holy crap
Last edited by robbit10 at Jan 15, 2013,
20Tigers
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#21
OMFG!!!! AAAARRRGGHHHH!!
Was typing an epic post (even by my own standards) on chord progressions covering everything in detail from cadences, to circle progressions, voice leading, harmonic function, diatonic chord substitution, wider harmonic structure all in one comprehensive explanation.

Thumb drifted to the touch pad on my laptop and somehow I got taken to the ad link leaving UG. When I clicked back - it was all gone. **** it. No one would have read it anyway it was way too long.
Si
robbit10
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#22
Quote by 20Tigers
OMFG!!!! AAAARRRGGHHHH!!
Was typing an epic post (even by my own standards) on chord progressions covering everything in detail from cadences, to circle progressions, voice leading, harmonic function, diatonic chord substitution, wider harmonic structure all in one comprehensive explanation.

Thumb drifted to the touch pad on my laptop and somehow I got taken to the ad link leaving UG. When I clicked back - it was all gone. **** it. No one would have read it anyway it was way too long.

AAWWWW!! I would've read that post... Oh well..
What browser are you using? If it's Firefox or Chrome, search for Lazarus. It will autosave whatever you've typed into a text area every minute or so, so that you can restore posts when something like this happens again.

Chrome: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/lazarus-form-recovery/loljledaigphbcpfhfmgopdkppkifgno
Firefox: https://addons.mozilla.org/nl/firefox/addon/lazarus-form-recovery/
TheHydra
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#23
Quote by 20Tigers
OMFG!!!! AAAARRRGGHHHH!!
Was typing an epic post (even by my own standards) on chord progressions covering everything in detail from cadences, to circle progressions, voice leading, harmonic function, diatonic chord substitution, wider harmonic structure all in one comprehensive explanation.

Thumb drifted to the touch pad on my laptop and somehow I got taken to the ad link leaving UG. When I clicked back - it was all gone. **** it. No one would have read it anyway it was way too long.

I would've read it.
Hail
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#24
i didn't even read that post except to see why somebody quoted it tbh
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MaggaraMarine
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#25
And then there's stuff like Dream Theater and Scale the Summit. Very complex...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-boKk8uhmcY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hBYgSc2Gys

Complex

Yes, I know.

But really, it's not only all about the chords. You can do some cool stuff with only four chords. For example the chorus of "Still Loving You" is four chords and works well. It's not only about the chords. It's about similar melodies, sounds and rhythms that every pop song has, and the lack of dynamics. It's so easy to make a decent sounding melody over I-V-vi-IV and people forget the old songs and they can reuse the melodies. For now I can't think of songs that have similar melody, chord progression, rhythm and overall feeling but I know I have heard many of them.

OK, there's two songs that come into my mind with obvious (and similar) melodies over vi-IV-I-V. Train - "Drive by" and Tacabro - "Tacata". Both have the same melody, "Tacata" is just in double tempo. That melody is the most obvious that I can think of over vi-IV-I-V. And I'm sure there are dozens of songs with similar chorus melodies.

If you learn more theory, every chord progression will not anymore sound that magical. At least you will be able to hear every chord progression used in every song. Some day I thought all the progressions Dream Theater used were magical. But now I have found them in many different songs. They still sound good but not like I would think "How did they do that?" Maybe it would just be good not to know all the chord progression so even a simple four chord progression would sound awesome and you wouldn't even notice that the songs sound the same.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jan 15, 2013,
CarsonStevens
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#26
Quote by MaggaraMarine
It's not only about the chords.


Following this line of thought, such things as vamps wouldn't even exist. After all, who but the most amateurish, unoriginal, downright stupid musicians would just bash away at one chord for the entire song?
Hail
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#29
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fixed
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food1010
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#30
A few notes on my response before you read it:

1) This is all speaking in terms of major keys. Much of it is relevant to minor keys, but don't worry about them yet.
2) When I use arabic numerals, I'm referring to the notes of the major scale. So, in C major, 1 is C, 2 is D, 3 is E, etc.
3) When I write out root/third/fifth, I'm talking about chord tones. These are in relation to the root of whatever chord you're on. So, the root, third and fifth of a V chord are scale degrees 5 7 and 2.
4) This is a pretty dense read, so PLEASE take your time reading this. There's a lot of information to take in. If it starts to feel overwhelming, just stop and let some of it sink in. Ask a question or two if you have to before you move on.

Quote by robbit10
V to I.. Does I to V count as well? And does V - IV - I count? Having different chords inbetween, but resolving eventually to the I? (Or the reverse, I to V)
I'm fairly new to harmony/chord theory, have recently learned how to harmonize the major scale and how to apply the roman numerals to it, but resolutions and cadences are still new to me.
I mean I to V is still effective harmonic motion, but it's entirely different because it's retrogressive, rather than progressive (a retrogression instead of a progression; in other words, leading away from the root instead of towards it).

Here's a quick lesson on harmonic function. There are three basic harmonic functions; tonic, dominant, and predominant. Tonic-functioning chords generally have a resolved sound, therefore they don't have a strong "pull," towards another chord. This "pull" is more accurately described as harmonic tension. In terms of the major scale, your tonic chord tones (1 3 5) are resolution notes, rather than tension notes. 4 and 7 are the strongest tension notes because they are a half-step away from the tonic chord tones. 2 and 6 are also used as tension notes, but they aren't as strong because they are whole steps away from the tonic chord tones.

So, with the idea of the 4 and 7 being strong tension notes, this leads us to the idea of "dominant function." The fifth scale degree is called the dominant, and likewise the chord built on it is the dominant chord. Dominant function chords have the strongest resolution to the tonic. This is what I was saying about the V to I resolution. If we look at a basic dominant chord (V, built with scale degrees 5 7 2), you see that two of the notes are potential tension notes (7 and 2). The 5 is actually a pretty stable note, since it's part of the tonic triad. 2 actually doesn't add that much tension in this case, since the fifth of any chord (2 is the fifth in a V chord) is generally pretty stable and doesn't quite function like the third does (the third in a V chord is the 7th scale degree, which is also known as the leading tone which is the strongest tension in tonal harmony). 7 is what defines dominant function (even though 5 is technically called the dominant).

Now, if you understand all this, let's take it one step further. I mentioned that the 4th scale degree is the second strongest tension. So now let's look at this in a dominant context. Let's stick one of these on a V chord to give it more tension. So now we have 5 7 2 4. Notice that these notes are all a third apart. In terms of chord tones, this is root, third, fifth, flat seventh (1 3 5 b7 makes it easier to visualize). If you know your chord construction, you would recognize this as a dominant seventh chord. This type of chord is technically called a major minor 7th chord (so your four basic seventh chords are major seventh, minor seventh, major minor seventh and minor major seventh, labeled as maj7, m7, 7, mmaj7 respectively). That's all semantics though. If you are using this chord with a dominant function, just call it a dominant seventh chord. Anyway, back on topic...

Something that gives the V7 (dominant seventh) chord a particularly strong type of tension has to do with just the 4 and 7, which are the two tension notes. Conveniently enough, they are a tritone apart (7 up to 4 is a diminished fifth and 4 up to 7 is an augmented fourth). The tritone is an interesting interval because it is an inversion of itself. Interval inversions are like this: C up to G is a perfect fifth, but C down to G (or G up to C if you prefer to stay consistent with ascending intervals) is a perfect fourth. Notice how it's the same two notes, but it's a different interval in different directions. However, the tritone is a tritone either way you look at it. 7 to 4 and 4 to 7 are both tritones. It also helps that the two notes resolve in opposite directions (4 down to 3 and 7 up to 1). If you ever study counterpoint, you will learn that contrary motion (i.e. two notes moving in opposite directions simultaneously) is generally smoother and fuller than parallel motion (i.e. two notes moving in the same direction simultaneously), especially when the notes move by the same interval.

Here's a little bit of chromatic harmony for you if you're interested. Since the V7 has a tritone in it, and the tritone is an inversion of itself, there is another dominant seventh chord that uses the exact same tritone, except the inversion. Instead of 7 being the third of the chord and 4 being the seventh, it's the opposite. This chord is called the "tritone substitution" and is conveniently a tritone away from the V chord. It is labeled V7sub in roman numeral notation and is rooted on the b2 (so in the key of C, it would be a Db7 chord, or Db F Ab Cb (or you can just call the Cb a B because that's how it functions).

Sorry for writing a novel and sorry if most of that is way over your head. Please don't just read all of that and question everything you thought you knew about music. Take it in bits and pieces. Fully understand a concept and be able to hear it, sing it, transpose it, etc. before you move onto the next concept or else you're going to get really lost.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
MaggaraMarine
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#31
Quote by CarsonStevens
Following this line of thought, such things as vamps wouldn't even exist. After all, who but the most amateurish, unoriginal, downright stupid musicians would just bash away at one chord for the entire song?

Yes, but I said it's not only about chords. Chords do matter. And you can do plenty with just one chord. But the less chords you have, the more interesting the melody/sounds have to be to sound good. Some examples of "one chord" songs: Led Zeppelin - "Whole Lotta Love" is pretty much one chord (or two chords but it would really sound the same if you only played E chord behind the vocal melody). Same with Guess Who - "American Woman", it wouldn't change how the song sounds like if you only played E chord behind the song and not the two power chords (B and D) before the E chord. They are both one riff songs too.

But chords aren't everything. As I said, you can do cool stuff with I-V-vi-IV. It doesn't sound overused only because of the chords, it also sounds overused because of the melodies and sounds and the lack of dynamics. RHCP - "Under the Bridge" is a good example of a song that uses the four chord progression well. It fits the song and doesn't sound overused.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Charvel So Cal
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20Tigers
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#32
Quote by MaggaraMarine

If you learn more theory, every chord progression will not anymore sound that magical. At least you will be able to hear every chord progression used in every song. Some day I thought all the progressions Dream Theater used were magical. But now I have found them in many different songs. They still sound good but not like I would think "How did they do that?" Maybe it would just be good not to know all the chord progression so even a simple four chord progression would sound awesome and you wouldn't even notice that the songs sound the same.

I disagree. Learning the theory and understanding chord progressions gave me another way of appreciating a good chord progression.
Si
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Join date: Oct 2009
3,409 IQ
#33
Quote by 20Tigers
I disagree. Learning the theory and understanding chord progressions gave me another way of appreciating a good chord progression.

Yes. Of course. But you start hearing the same chords used in every song. But you are right. I only used to listen to the melody and guitar riff. Now I can listen to chord progressions and analyze them. And if I find a cool chord progression, I just listen to it and pick the chords up. Yeah, you kind of listen to the music another way when you know what's happening in the song and can analyze it. I didn't mean that knowing theory is bad. Everything just sounds different now. And I wasn't serious when I said the last sentence.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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BostonStrong5
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2013
10 IQ
#34
What are common NOTE progressions when trying to outline a chord ?

Can anyone let me know What notes you like to outlline ?
Last edited by BostonStrong5 at Jul 18, 2013,
cdgraves
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
43 IQ
#35
Quote by BostonStrong5
What are common NOTE progressions when trying to outline a chord /


You mean an arpeggio?

Progression isn't a term that applies to individual notes. Strictly speaking, it doesn't even apply to all chord sequences.
BostonStrong5
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2013
10 IQ
#36
No just when you pick up a guitar what and say you want to play in A mixo what notes do you like to outline that sound good together ?
AlanHB
Godin's Resident Groupie
Join date: Aug 2008
1,703 IQ
#37
^^^ Chord tones with other tones to link them together.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#38
Yeah it's a myth that only jazz players follow the changes.
macashmack
Maskcashmack
Join date: May 2011
3,359 IQ
#39
Quote by BostonStrong5
No just when you pick up a guitar what and say you want to play in A mixo what notes do you like to outline that sound good together ?

Id never pick up my guitar and say "A mixo" unless I'm smacked and down to do a 15 minute improv that ends up sounding bad do to my own lack of ability.


TS; It's all about the voicing. If you just play the open shapes of C Am G and F then it will sound bland and generic and make teenage girls wet. But if you add a little voice leading, maybe walk that bass line down, then it'll sound unique-er and still make them girls slippery.
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#40
Quote by macashmack
Id never pick up my guitar and say "A mixo" unless I'm smacked and down to do a 15 minute improv that ends up sounding bad do to my own lack of ability.


TS; It's all about the voicing. If you just play the open shapes of C Am G and F then it will sound bland and generic and make teenage girls wet. But if you add a little voice leading, maybe walk that bass line down, then it'll sound unique-er and still make them girls slippery.

Do both options result in the same level of female wetness? If so, TS, then just go for the easier option. You only want to exert the least amount of effort for the same result/affect (or is it effect)?