Alphaform
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Join date: Jul 2012
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#1
My strat is fretting out on whole step bends on the 1st string. I'm wondering how I can resolve this. My local tech said he cant do anything.If there is something i can do i will find a new tech!

Thanks
Last edited by Alphaform at Jan 16, 2013,
W4RP1G
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#2
Find a new tech. And raise your action.
Dave_Mc
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#3
+1

you shouldn't be fretting out on whole step bends with 9.5" radius.
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Alphaform
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Join date: Jul 2012
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#4
Hmmm, shame. I'll talk to him again.

What are the options of fixing it, cause I don't think the action is too low. Plus it's very comfortable at where it is and bends are easy.
W4RP1G
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#6
Quote by Alphaform
Hmmm, shame. I'll talk to him again.

What are the options of fixing it, cause I don't think the action is too low. Plus it's very comfortable at where it is and bends are easy.

Sounds to me like it's too low. But I don't know where it actually is, so I can only go by what you told me.
Alphaform
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#7
Quote by W4RP1G
Sounds to me like it's too low. But I don't know where it actually is, so I can only go by what you told me.


12th fret and above on only the 1st string.
W4RP1G
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#8
Quote by Alphaform
12th fret and above on only the 1st string.

I don't mean which fret, I mean how high is the action.

Also, i hope you don't intend to go back to that same tech.
Alphaform
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Join date: Jul 2012
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#9
It's a shame because my next closest tech seems to be about 1.5 hours away
Last edited by Alphaform at Jan 16, 2013,
W4RP1G
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#10
Quote by Alphaform
It's a shame because my next closest tech seems to be about 1.5 hours away, and this one is only 10 minutes. Maybe you guys could help me find one? In the Gippsland/Latrobe Valley region of Victoria, Australia

Stop using a tech. Watch some youtube vidoes on setting up a strat. It's not hard at all.
Alphaform
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#11
Well can you point me in the right direction for a tutorial on how to fix the problem I'm having right now?
Alphaform
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#13
Alright so my problem is due to action being too low? I just don't like setting up guitars myself cause I'm scared I'll make a mess of a $1500 guitar lol.
W4RP1G
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#14
Quote by Alphaform
Alright so my problem is due to action being too low? I just don't like setting up guitars myself cause I'm scared I'll make a mess of a $1500 guitar lol.

The worst you can do is give it a poor setup. Just use common sense. You've been handing your $1500 guitar over to someone that didn't know what they were doing anyway
FatalGear41
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#15
Fretting out is a royal pain in the ass, and there are a couple of causes for it. Most people go right for the bridge saddle height, but in my experience this usually is not the culprit unless you play with a super-low action. No, the most common cause of fretting out is that the guitar needs a minor - and I do mean minor - tweak of the truss rod. About 1/4 turn will often fix the problem. Have a good tech check your neck bow and look for any neck twist. It is a quick and easy fix.

Now, some guitars fret out because of a poorly designed bridge. My '52 Reissue Telecaster used to fret out like a son of a bitch. I swapped the three-saddle bridge for the six-saddle one, but no luck. I went over the neck with a fine-toothed comb, but there were no problems. So I swapped out the "vintage" style bridge for a modern telecaster bridge and the problem disappeared immediately. Not only that, but the guitar plays better than it ever did. "Vintage" isn't always better.

Since Strat bridges usually don't cause such problems, I'll bet you need a little adjustment of the truss rod. As I said, have that looked at before you drive yourself mad with unnecessary bridge adjustments that will take a great deal of time and effort to undo.

Good luck!
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W4RP1G
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#16
Quote by FatalGear41
Fretting out is a royal pain in the ass, and there are a couple of causes for it. Most people go right for the bridge saddle height, but in my experience this usually is not the culprit unless you play with a super-low action. No, the most common cause of fretting out is that the guitar needs a minor - and I do mean minor - tweak of the truss rod. About 1/4 turn will often fix the problem. Have a good tech check your neck bow and look for any neck twist. It is a quick and easy fix.

Now, some guitars fret out because of a poorly designed bridge. My '52 Reissue Telecaster used to fret out like a son of a bitch. I swapped the three-saddle bridge for the six-saddle one, but no luck. I went over the neck with a fine-toothed comb, but there were no problems. So I swapped out the "vintage" style bridge for a modern telecaster bridge and the problem disappeared immediately. Not only that, but the guitar plays better than it ever did. "Vintage" isn't always better.

Since Strat bridges usually don't cause such problems, I'll bet you need a little adjustment of the truss rod. As I said, have that looked at before you drive yourself mad with unnecessary bridge adjustments that will take a great deal of time and effort to undo.

Good luck!

You're adjusting your action with your truss rod, that's why that fixes it. But that is a no-no. You should never used the truss rod to adjust the action. You should adjust the truss rod to where it should be and then adjust the saddle height. If your bends fret out and the truss rod is adjusted within the ideal specs, then it's definitely an issue with the string height. You should never adjust your truss rod to fix an action issue!

Sorry man, but you've been doing it all wrong.
BigSmokeDawg
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#17
Sorry for derailing a bit, but could somebody explain what fretting out is? I've never heard of that term before.
FatalGear41
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#18
Quote by W4RP1G
You're adjusting your action with your truss rod, that's why that fixes it. But that is a no-no. You should never used the truss rod to adjust the action. You should adjust the truss rod to where it should be and then adjust the saddle height. If your bends fret out and the truss rod is adjusted within the ideal specs, then it's definitely an issue with the string height. You should never adjust your truss rod to fix an action issue!

Sorry man, but you've been doing it all wrong.


Actually, no. The truss rod adjustment corrects a twist in the neck; not an issue with string height. Since the problem (in the cases I've had with my guitars) could not be fixed with an action adjustment - one tech suggested that I shim the neck of one guitar to fix the problem - but was corrected with a truss rod adjustment, it was a neck twist. The string height was fine. I agree with you that adding bow to the neck to change the action is a bad idea, but if you've got a twist in your neck, raising the strings to an unplayable height is not going to solve the problem.

The easiest way to tell is if the "fretting out" is a new issue with your guitar. If it didn't fret out previously, then something has changed. Since the string action does not raise or lower by itself - but your neck can twist by itself thanks to weather conditions - that should indicate a problem with neck twist.

Too many people think that everything from fretting out to string buzz is automatically an issue of string height at the bridge, but since I've run into the problem with the occasional fixed-bridge guitar, I know that the action did not shift.
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#19
Quote by BigSmokeDawg
Sorry for derailing a bit, but could somebody explain what fretting out is? I've never heard of that term before.

Its when you bend a note and it just goes silent, and doesn't ring out like it should.
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FatalGear41
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#20
Quote by BigSmokeDawg
Sorry for derailing a bit, but could somebody explain what fretting out is? I've never heard of that term before.


By and large, it is when you bend a note (usually a lot, rather than a little) and the string on which you are playing ends up pressing against one or more of the frets further down the neck, thereby causing the note to stop sounding. You run into this more often on "vintage" guitars with very rounded (by today's standards) fretboard radiuses. It is an absolutely annoying-as-hell phenomenon.
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W4RP1G
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#21
Quote by FatalGear41
Actually, no. The truss rod adjustment corrects a twist in the neck; not an issue with string height. Since the problem (in the cases I've had with my guitars) could not be fixed with an action adjustment - one tech suggested that I shim the neck of one guitar to fix the problem - but was corrected with a truss rod adjustment, it was a neck twist. The string height was fine. I agree with you that adding bow to the neck to change the action is a bad idea, but if you've got a twist in your neck, raising the strings to an unplayable height is not going to solve the problem.

The easiest way to tell is if the "fretting out" is a new issue with your guitar. If it didn't fret out previously, then something has changed. Since the string action does not raise or lower by itself - but your neck can twist by itself thanks to weather conditions - that should indicate a problem with neck twist.

Too many people think that everything from fretting out to string buzz is automatically an issue of string height at the bridge, but since I've run into the problem with the occasional fixed-bridge guitar, I know that the action did not shift.

A neck twist is not fixable with a truss rod adjustment. A neck twist is warping, not a bow. The truss rod can't fix a neck twist as it only controls the bow.

Also, a neck is more likely to bow due to weather than to twist(thank god). I'm not sure if you are talking about an actual neck twist, or just a typical neck bow? Can you please clarify that that for me?