Page 1 of 2
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#1
Hi all,

I've seen a lot of posts lately that have portrayed a need for knowledge in the application of modes. It seems a lot of us know our modes, but, don't know how to put them to use. I thought I would try explain a practical way to use the modes. If this has already been explained, feel free to delete this thread, but I haven't seen it.

In early western music, before standardized notation, the modes were used to denote what order scale pitches were to be sounded in. Today, we don't need that. However, modes play a part in detailing what notes will be applicable over a certain chords.

First of all, it is important to note the nuances of each mode. Every mode serves a purpose, a different grouping of notes.

I - Ionian - Major Scale
ii - Dorian - Minor (#6)
iii - Phrygian - Minor (b2)
IV - Lydian - Major (#4)
V - Midolydian - Major (b7)
vi - Aeolian - Minor Scale
vii - Locrian - Minor (b2)(b3)(b5)(b6)(b7)

Note:: The Lorcian mode is usually thrown out for the more accessible Octotonic scale (aka Diminished Scale, Half/ Whole Scale)
As the later name suggests, it is simply a pattern of half step, whole step, half, whole, etc.


Now, there are a few of these that are rarely used in their true form. Phrygian, Locrian, and Lydian, are usually altered. In fact, most of the time, the modes are going to be altered by using various accidentals and elements of the harmonic minor scale.

At this point, the name is simply a way to describe what set of notes you are using, so the names can vary.

Say you are playing a song, and you come across a chord such as Cmaj7. This is a tonic function chord, so, you would mostly likely play a normal major scale over top of it. However, what if it was marked as Cmaj7 (#4)? This is when your brain should say, "Sharp four...That means Lydian!". So, over #4 chords, a possible solution is Lydian.

This applies to all chords, when you see a chord symbol, it is important to realize the chord's function, then figure out what alterations it is calling for.

Ex.
G7(b9). Dominant function and with a flatted 2nd degree, you could use Mixolydian (b2) over that chord.
Another choice, would be to use the H/W scale.

Am7(b5). This is a half diminished chord. So, it is possible Aeolian(b5), Locrian, or even G Lydian would work into this (b5 becomes #4 when transposed to G).

Another thing to note: It is not imperative that you only use notes contained in the chord. For instance, if given a simple E7, you could use various modes (Mixolydian(b2), Lydian(b7), or Phrygian, to create close harmonies that allow for tension in the music.

This is where it goes back to the basic structure of the chord. As long as (for instance E7) an E, G#, B (not required), and D, are present, you can fill in with other notes to give the chord different qualities.

This is very hard to explain in type. So, please ask if you have any questions.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
Last edited by Angusman60 at Jan 16, 2013,
macashmack
Maskcashmack
Join date: May 2011
3,359 IQ
#2
This seems really hard to remember while improvising. I'll stick to major/minor keys and solfeggio
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#3
It's like anything else, once you learn the patterns, it becomes second nature. Then the names are pretty meaningless...
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#6
Quote by Angusman60
It's like anything else, once you learn the patterns, it becomes second nature. Then the names are pretty meaningless...


yep. and then the entire method defeats itself - because the names are the only thing this method has.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#7
All I'm trying to say is, if you are going to learn modes, this would be the reason.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
AlanHB
Godin's Resident Groupie
Join date: Aug 2008
1,703 IQ
#8
^^^ I dunno, there are other reasons to learn modes. This one has blatant disregard for the harmonic context and tonic.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#9
Why can't we just make shit up as we go along? That would be so much better. While improvising, if you're looking at a chart, ok. But it may still sound mechanical. If you are just listening and making a soundscape, this outlined method is going to get in the way too.

Chords and scales go hand in hand but you rarely have a one chord song. So you'll need more chords to justify scale/chord relationships. What if the chord at that point in time passes in an 8th - you come from the previous chord widdle to focus on the single 8th duration. Will what you play gel with the next chord? Where will it lead? Will it take the listener away from said tonic and move to another?

Make a chart and outline it, followed with an mp3 of various things that can happen. This should be an interesting exercise to whomever takes it on. This forum section seems to be the teaching aspect, so it will be interesting to see it done.
Last edited by evolucian at Jan 17, 2013,
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#10
give a man a scale, feed him for a day. teach him how to make music, feed him for a lifetime.
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#11
Quote by AlanHB
^^^ I dunno, there are other reasons to learn modes. This one has blatant disregard for the harmonic context and tonic.


Well, in this case, the harmonic context is within the chord you are playing over. To another point, often in jazz music, the "normal" harmonic function of the chord is thrown out, anyway. As far as tonic, I was coming into this hoping that most people here knew the harmonic function of each mode in the first place, since there is so much talk of it on this forum.

As far as reasons, I'm coming from a performance stand point. If I'm using modes in a performance, it is to use them to alter my major or minor scale to fit the changes I'm playing over. Granted, I've studied jazz theory, so, it's a little less confusing from my point of view.

Modes are useful in several fashions. For performance, they are only practical in learning sets of notes. Since there seems to be confusion about modes here, I thought I'd try and help using the knowledge I have.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#12
Quote by Angusman60
Well, in this case, the harmonic context is within the chord you are playing over. To another point, often in jazz music, the "normal" harmonic function of the chord is thrown out, anyway. As far as tonic, I was coming into this hoping that most people here knew the harmonic function of each mode in the first place, since there is so much talk of it on this forum.

As far as reasons, I'm coming from a performance stand point. If I'm using modes in a performance, it is to use them to alter my major or minor scale to fit the changes I'm playing over. Granted, I've studied jazz theory, so, it's a little less confusing from my point of view.

Modes are useful in several fashions. For performance, they are only practical in learning sets of notes. Since there seems to be confusion about modes here, I thought I'd try and help using the knowledge I have.


there's nothing confusing about it, it's just an inefficient line of thought and it's inherently restricted to a finite number of scales rather than a rational and intuitive ability to create melodies on the fly based on context beyond the note choices available to you.
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#13
I agree that it is rather inefficient, which is why I am trying to stress that is only useful insofar as learning scale patterns.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
EmilGD
Unregistered User
Join date: Feb 2008
93 IQ
#14
And then why would you not rather spend the time doing something more useful?
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#15
This method helped me learn the basic of jazz improvisation.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#16
Quote by Angusman60
This method helped me learn the basic of jazz improvisation.

What, modes?
AlanHB
Godin's Resident Groupie
Join date: Aug 2008
1,703 IQ
#17
Quote by Angusman60
Well, in this case, the harmonic context is within the chord you are playing over. To another point, often in jazz music, the "normal" harmonic function of the chord is thrown out, anyway. As far as tonic, I was coming into this hoping that most people here knew the harmonic function of each mode in the first place, since there is so much talk of it on this forum.

As far as reasons, I'm coming from a performance stand point. If I'm using modes in a performance, it is to use them to alter my major or minor scale to fit the changes I'm playing over. Granted, I've studied jazz theory, so, it's a little less confusing from my point of view.

Modes are useful in several fashions. For performance, they are only practical in learning sets of notes. Since there seems to be confusion about modes here, I thought I'd try and help using the knowledge I have.


Mate, I'm not confused by his approach, it simply does not care about whether a song is major/minor or what the tonic is, which is pretty destructive because those two things are omnipresent throughout a song regardless of what chord is played.

However you say that in jazz music the harmonic function of chords no longer exist? Surely not. Unless you are in fact talking about atonal jazz (I dont even want to imagine), there is a harmonic context, giving function to the chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#18
Quote by AlanHB
Mate, I'm not confused by his approach, it simply does not care about whether a song is major/minor or what the tonic is, which is pretty destructive because those two things are omnipresent throughout a song regardless of what chord is played.


this is exactly the thought process that those of us who do not subscribe to the method in question take. ultimately thinking in this vein requires you to ignore what's happening around you on a grander scale - you are thinking only in terms of chords.

when playing bebop lead, i sometimes think something like this, but it never has anything to do with modes -- none of this mixolydian #5 crap. i simply play them for what they are -- chromatic alterations, leading tones, or what have you. it's not really so much a chord-scale approach as it is embellishment.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#20
Quote by AlanHB
Mate, I'm not confused by his approach, it simply does not care about whether a song is major/minor or what the tonic is, which is pretty destructive because those two things are omnipresent throughout a song regardless of what chord is played.

However you say that in jazz music the harmonic function of chords no longer exist? Surely not. Unless you are in fact talking about atonal jazz (I dont even want to imagine), there is a harmonic context, giving function to the chords.



It actually does consider that. But, that isn't what I was addressing. I was addressing how to alter the scale to fit a certain chord. Of course if you are playing a tune in Bb, you will use all modes with Bb.

Also, in jazz music, at times, function is thrown out the window. For instance, in many, many cases, a dominant chord is used as a tonic.

Your accusations are simply putting words in my mouth.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#21
Quote by Angusman60
It actually does consider that. But, that isn't what I was addressing. I was addressing how to alter the scale to fit a certain chord. Of course if you are playing a tune in Bb, you will use all modes with Bb.


if you think your approach considers what we're discussing, PROVE IT. saying "it actually does, but that's not the point" does nothing for us and only makes your arguments and concepts look weaker. prove to me that your chord-scale method takes all the elements of the bigger picture into account.

Quote by Angusman60
Also, in jazz music, at times, function is thrown out the window. For instance, in many, many cases, a dominant chord is used as a tonic.


still a function. there's much you're still not considering.

Quote by Angusman60
Your accusations are simply putting words in my mouth.


at least somebody is.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#22
Everything in this post will be relevant to the key of C major.

When improvising over changes in this key, obviously, you would use the C major scale or C major pentatonic.

If, for instance, you are playing a twelve bar blues form, when coming upon a IV chord, you would center your licks around F, or use the Lydian mode. Yes, you are using the same notes, but, using this mode allows for tonicization of the IV chord and makes the chord change more apparent within your solo. Think of it as being able to tell that a player has changed chords even without chords underneath him.

Obviously this applies to V as well. But what if the V is altered with a b9? In this case, you would use Mixolydian(b2)(b6). Now, this mode can also be called Phrygian Dominant since it is Phrygian mode with a major 3rd and serves a dominant function. It is also derived from the 5th mode of the Harmonic Minor scale.

C Db E F G Ab Bb C

So, as you can see. This mode has a dominant function, yet it can be called Phrygian. Simply a name to call this cluster of notes.

Another example. Cmaj7(#11). This is often used as a tonic chord in jazz pieces. While you could say Ionian(#4), it is just easier to say "Use Lydian".

A third example. Lydian Dominant. Often used over V(#11) chords. Lydian mode with a lowered 7th.

What else do you want me to prove?
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
Deadds
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2010
191 IQ
#23
Quote by Angusman60
Everything in this post will be relevant to the key of C major.

When improvising over changes in this key, obviously, you would use the C major scale or C major pentatonic.


Or? It's the same thing.
AETHERA
Registered User
Join date: May 2010
43 IQ
#24
Quote by Angusman60
Everything in this post will be relevant to the key of C major.

When improvising over changes in this key, obviously, you would use the C major scale or C major pentatonic.

If, for instance, you are playing a twelve bar blues form, when coming upon a IV chord, you would center your licks around F (1), or use the Lydian mode. Yes, you are using the same notes, but, using this mode allows for tonicization of the IV chord and makes the chord change more apparent within your solo (2). Think of it as being able to tell that a player has changed chords even without chords underneath him.

Obviously this applies to V as well. But what if the V is altered with a b9? In this case, you would use Mixolydian(b2)(b6) (3). Now, this mode can also be called Phrygian Dominant since it is Phrygian mode with a major 3rd and serves a dominant function. It is also derived from the 5th mode of the Harmonic Minor scale.

C Db E F G Ab Bb C

So, as you can see. This mode has a dominant function (3), yet it can be called Phrygian. Simply a name to call this cluster of notes.

Another example. Cmaj7(#11). This is often used as a tonic chord in jazz pieces. While you could say Ionian(#4), it is just easier to say "Use Lydian".

A third example. Lydian Dominant. Often used over V(#11) chords. Lydian mode with a lowered 7th.

What else do you want me to prove?



1) You could, not you will or you should. Playing on or around chord roots may as well be the most basic form of vertical (as opposed to melody-centric, horizontal, voice-led) improvisation available. In a harsh lean, it can be seen as a crutch, since if you play the root of a note, you really have to put in work to make it sound bad in its context.


2) You wouldn't use Lydian to tonicize F: you'd use a C7 chord followed by F and whatever notes suit your fancy. Drop that Bb in there anywhere you like, and the closest you'll get to a 'modal' description of what's happening would be, if anything, Mixolydian, but even then, that's degrading C major.


3) Or you could use G , B, and D, plus any other notes your ear finds which it likes over the chord. Again, hugging the basic triad in play is a limiting concept which sacrifices creating a melody to creating a case-by-case harmony which doesn't stretch the tension of the sound too far on the chord, with such a harmonic sanctity as the only organizing principle of that approach. In a brief sense, I don't hear you play the b9 of the chord underneath your melody and say to myself, "Oh, hey that's a nice b9 he just hit! He's playing chord tones! " Instead, I'm more interested in the melody you are playing, not the chords under it; my brain does the work on how the melody relates to the chords, but my mind stays prim and proper absorbing the melody.


An aside: correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't blues take a lot of stock in using a minor third over a major chord? I mean, that sorta breaks the whole frame right there, if it is in fact correct... o.o


*tempted to whip out Hal Galper on "Let the melody be your guide."*
You might could use some double modals.
Deadds
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2010
191 IQ
#25
Anyway i think i see the problem here.

I too use the modal approach to soloing but I also see how it's not useful.

example:

Your approach deals with extended and altered chords as they appear.

You see this "G7b9" and you play G mixo(flat2)
-----

ok fine.

The problem is that lead sheets don't come with extended and altered chords. That's up to you to decide.

In a jazz band, during solo's, non-soloist are playing un-altered and sometimes basic chords leaving the soloist to play those color tones during his solo.

Also, the modal approach works well when you HAVE to solo over altered chords. When there's money on the table you better damn well play what they want and play those altered scales.

Quote by Angusman60


If, for instance, you are playing a twelve bar blues form, when coming upon a IV chord, you would center your licks around F, or use the Lydian mode. Yes, you are using the same notes, but, using this mode allows for tonicization of the IV chord and makes the chord change more apparent within your solo. Think of it as being able to tell that a player has changed chords even without chords underneath him.


Why go chord by chord when you can just group the chords into a progression and play the scale the progression is based off.

You wanna make the chord change more apparent? Then play chord tones. This isn't a good enough reason to use a modal approach.

Quote by Angusman60

Obviously this applies to V as well. But what if the V is altered with a b9? In this case, you would use Mixolydian(b2)(b6).


This is a valid enough reason to use the modal approach, but...

In a jazz band, during solo's, non-soloist are playing un-altered and sometimes basic chords leaving the soloist to play those color tones during his solo.

I use the modal approach for solo guitar work. When i know what chord i want or what chord i want to be implying with my line.

Tonal Approach:

"OK, G7b9, that's C major with an Ab. Now this G7b9b13 is C major with an Ab and an Eb"

Or...

Modal Approach:

"OK, G7b9 then G7b9b13, use Gmixo(2b) and Gmixo(2b 6b)

It's just two methods that lead to the same thing, but the tonal approach does give you a bit more information, unless you know all the modes in every key by heart... which i doubt.
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#26
Quote by Angusman60
I agree that it is rather inefficient, which is why I am trying to stress that is only useful insofar as learning scale patterns.


do we really need to go into why scale patterns are gonna be a bad time?
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#27
TS, you ever heard of chord tones and arpeggios? You clearly listen to a lot of jazz.

Your modal approach to jazz improvisation is more suited to modal jazz, funnily enough. Not bop.

Go listen to some Bird or Herb Ellis, ya know?

I don't know what kind of jazz classes you've been taking, but if they don't emphasize the importance of chord tone soloing then, well, might wanna reconsider your teachers.
Last edited by mdc at Jan 18, 2013,
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#28
When I studied jazz they did emphasize chord tones when solo. I use chord tones all the time when improvising. But, I'm talking about modes, not arpeggios, in this case.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#30
Not always. But, when you have a modulatory progression, like Black Narcissus, the method comes in quite handy.

http://www.guitarcats.com/realbook-jazz-standards/black-narcissus
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#31
So what would you use for the first 16 bars, and the last 8 bars?
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#32
For the first 8 I would use Ab Dorian, since the Abm7 to D7 progression is a ii - V doing directly to Gbm7. From there, you could use minor, Dorian, or Phrygian. The final 8 bars have a faster harmonic motion, so, you would need to change modes each chord. Obviously, Lydian for the (#4) chords.

When playing over one of the dominant chords I would probably switch it up and use Phrygian Dominant, especially towards the end of a phrase. Since PD is derived from harmonic minor, it has leading tones that help pull the melodic line through the cadence.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
chronowarp
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
43 IQ
#33
You must be white. Only a white person would play phrygian dominant over a dom7.

The issue with the scale per chord approach is that it just encourages, disjunct, awkward lines. The amount of energy you'd have to invest to seamlessly intertwine 12 different scales into 12 bars of music, in one cohesive area of the fretboard is outrageous. If you just think in terms of the chords, and use common jazz soloing conventions like half step approaches...then you'd have a much easier time playing, conceptualizing, and organizing your lines.
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#34
You are absolutely correct. This method is academic and sometimes cumbersome. It is the way people learn jazz in the university environment. Nonetheless, it is a utilization on modes, which, is the original reason for starting this thread.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
chronowarp
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
43 IQ
#35
I don't know if you've noticed yet, but there's a stigma attached to the word "mode" on this board. Like, I swear, there must be some mass notification that alerts Aeolian_Wolf, Hail, MDC, jazz_rock_theory, and AlanHB anytime the word "mode" is used in the Musician Talk subforum.

As much as I think the term is largely irrelevant in most instances, I don't harbor the same hatred for it. However, I do think it's totally counterproductive and unhelpful to frame or explain the relevance on modes in the CST arena. It's just not helpful to the people it's directed at (guitar noobs), and is just a really convoluted way of explaining "think about the chord tones, and study jazz to understand how and why chromaticism is used in relation to those chord tones".
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#36
Indeed. I think this topic has gone way above this forum's understanding.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
jazz_rock_feel
UG Resident
Join date: Jun 2006
2,342 IQ
#37
Quote by chronowarp
I don't know if you've noticed yet, but there's a stigma attached to the word "mode" on this board. Like, I swear, there must be some mass notification that alerts Aeolian_Wolf, Hail, MDC, jazz_rock_theory, and AlanHB anytime the word "mode" is used in the Musician Talk subforum.

I resent that. I rarely contribute to modes threads other than posting a snappy gif

Also I have almost no problem with modes, just the misunderstanding of them. It's almost impossible to attempt to teach someone or have a discussion about modes without the crosstalk of whether they exist or not, which is the farthest thing from being helpful, so I just choose to say nothing.
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#38
Quote by Angusman60
Indeed. I think this topic has gone way above this forum's understanding.

Then perhaps help them understand by composing a chart with workable examples and possible variations. That might do the trick - share the knowledge instead of thinking its above someones paygrade. Just my 2 cents.

*edit* After all, the thread title did say practical (x) application
Last edited by evolucian at Jan 18, 2013,
Angusman60
I think, therefore, I am.
Join date: Aug 2004
987 IQ
#39
Part of the problem is that music theory is nearly impossible to speak of in an online forum. Not to mention there is not easy way to post notation to illustrate one's point.
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


My Website
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#40
Quote by Angusman60
Part of the problem is that music theory is nearly impossible to speak of in an online forum. Not to mention there is not easy way to post notation to illustrate one's point.

Nearly impossible? This section of the forum blatantly advertises the use of theory. Theory books are in print format, so they use typed words. This forum seems to use the same format

Sibelius/Finale --> screen shot - ctrl v --> Paint/Photoshop --> Photobucket/Boxnet/any other service --> link in thread + typed text

*edit* And if we're really lucky:
Guitar --> Cubase/Sonar/ProTools/Other shit -->mp3 --> Boxnet/soundcloud --> link in thread accompanying said text
Last edited by evolucian at Jan 18, 2013,