Green_Ghoul
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Join date: Aug 2010
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#1
I've been listening to a lot of Jesus and Mary Chain lately, I really like their sound and I've been trying to make something similar but is my own.

The thing is, I can't get either of my guitars (69 mustang reissue and a stratocaster) to feedback unless I really pump the volume/distortion. In the end it's very whiny sounding like when you put a microphone next to the speaker. Kinda sucks.

I know that they used hollow bodies a lot, would that be the biggest factor? It's kinda hard for me to find one, being left handed. Does something like a thinline telecaster have the same effect since they're partially hollowed?

Thanks for any help
MrFlibble
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Join date: Apr 2008
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#2
When hollow and semi-hollow guitars catch feedback it does tend to be more pronounced, but they don't actually make it any easier to create feedback in the first place. It's just more obvious when they do.

Really, feedback is about being in the right place at the right time. There's no guitar spec that can force feedback easier. What you need to do is work out where in a room you need to be standing to 'catch' feedback. Depending on the shape, size and contents of a room, where you need to be standing is going to change. Nine times out of ten, simply standing right in front of your speakers with the gain and mids jacked up is the easiest way to get feedback, but it still may not sound as you want it.

If you want reliable feedback, the only way to really do it is by faking it.

The Fernandes Sustainer system comes with a switch which allows you to generate a harmonic, giving an effect similar to feedback, though this means routing your guitar out for the system and losing your neck pickup in the process.
Boss now make a pedal called the FB-2, which is a boost pedal with a secondary function which creates a fake feedback tone.

Either of those two systems is your best hope.
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Stealthtastic
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#3
Boost your gain and kill your noisegate = instant feedback.
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GunsNSnakepits
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#4
Crappy pickups usually do the job
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Green_Ghoul
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Join date: Aug 2010
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#5
so it'll just be more "defined" with a semi-hollow or hollow body? I guess that's more of the word I was looking for, rather than easily.
MrFlibble
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#7
Quote by Green_Ghoul
so it'll just be more "defined" with a semi-hollow or hollow body? I guess that's more of the word I was looking for, rather than easily.
Yes and no. Usually we reserve talk of 'definition' for clarity, overtones and harmonics. In the case of feedback it is better to simply say it is louder, more obvious, etc.

I know, it doesn't make sense. But talking about guitar tone never does.

So, no, it is not better 'defined', as such, but yes, the more hollow the guitar is the louder feedback will seem and the more it will drown out the original note (especially if the guitar has large f-holes or a lot of space directly below the strings).

However, you do still need to be in the right place at the right time to 'catch' feedback properly, regardless of the guitar being used. It really is far easier (and much, much cheaper, compared to buying a new guitar) to simply use a pedal or sustainer system that can simulate feedback.


edit: an option I had forgotten before—and a pretty expensive one—is to use a Line 6 JTV modelling guitar with a Line 6 HD500 foot controller. By connecting these to a computer you can set up the guitar's tone and volume controls to alter things other than the tone/volume. So you can turn a tone control into a wah, a master volume, a synth sound or a pitch shifter, which gives you another way of simulating feedback. Obviously it is quite drastic to overhaul your entire rig for the sake of playing with effects that you'll likely only use once per show, but if you're really into doing different effects and 'tricks' with your playing then this may be worth looking into.
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Last edited by MrFlibble at Jan 20, 2013,
Snapple
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#8
A sustainer would work, I have a lovepedal redhead pedal that also does a good job for feedback but it does add gain as well.
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WholeLottaIzzy
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#9
It's usually a volume thing. Then the quality of the feedback depends on the quality of the pickups, it would seem reasonable that the string gauge would have an effect too. Try hold the guitar facing the amp and turn and twist the guitar to change the sound
rocknroll93
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#11
Quote by GunsNSnakepits
Crappy pickups usually do the job

this, or some decent humbuckers can, if you use a reasonable amount of gain.

but the shit ones, man.
I got a guitar with em, and I can't distort too much, or feeback everywhere.
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No.


Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
Green_Ghoul
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#12
So, hypothetically, if I was in the market for a new guitar, would a thinline tele or a hollow-body style guitar be better for the jesus and mary chain/velvet underground noise-pop stuff? I really want to drown the notes I play
CrazyPigeon
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#15
Quote by Green_Ghoul
are those in left handed???

Well, if you're a bit handy, you can convert them very easily. Simply a case of flipping the nut around really; if you can cope with the controls being on the wrong side. The backwards polarity of the pickups would also help.
Axe Murderer
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Join date: Jan 2008
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#16
Position, location, volume of amp and guitar. Thats all you need.
mattrusso
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#17
Use a fully hollow guitar (NOT semi-hollow) and crank up the volume and/or overdrive. A thinline tele is really just a chambered body with an f hole, not even a true semi-hollow. Pretty much any fully hollow guitar is prone to feedback in that situation. For rock sounds, look at Gretsches, Epiphone Casinos, and the Godin 5th Avenue CW Kingpin II. You could also check out some jazz-oriented guitars.
Green_Ghoul
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Join date: Aug 2010
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#18
Quote by mattrusso
Use a fully hollow guitar (NOT semi-hollow) and crank up the volume and/or overdrive. A thinline tele is really just a chambered body with an f hole, not even a true semi-hollow. Pretty much any fully hollow guitar is prone to feedback in that situation. For rock sounds, look at Gretsches, Epiphone Casinos, and the Godin 5th Avenue CW Kingpin II. You could also check out some jazz-oriented guitars.


I guess I'll start looking for a fully hollow left handed guitar. I don't really want to flip an instrument...tried it with an acoustic guitar and the intonation/action was terrible, even after attempted to do a setup =\

I think Epi Casinos were produced left handed at one point, I guess I'll keep an eye out for one of those.

But, worst case scenario, if it's impossible to find a full hollow body guitar, would a semi hollow somehow get the job done?
mattrusso
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#19
Not really. Semi-hollows aren't really any more prone to feedback than regular solid bodies.
MrFlibble
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#20
Again, it's not about them being 'prone' or not; they're all as 'prone' to feedback as each other. It is simply that the more wood you take out close to the strings, the stronger the feedback effect will sound.

Personally, I thik it is not a good idea to buy a semi-hollow or hollow guitar exclusively for getting more pronounced feedback. If you're not getting feedback with your solid then you won't be getting it with the new guitar, either; a Boss FB-2 will do the same job, with more control and with any guitar you own for far less money than a new guitar costs; semi-hollow and hollow guitars sound drastically different to a solid one and there's no point taking on a whole different fundamental tone just for the sake of one trick.

The real trick to the 'noise pop' sound is simply grabbing a mid-gain amp, cranking it all the way, shoving a boost, OD or even a fuzz or distortion pedal in front of it, and basically just creating an inaudible wall of noise. The guitar used is one of the least relevant elements.

And, if you're not sold by the concept of simulated feedback, try this. I've used the FB-2 myself (albeit only briefly) and this is very close to how it sounds in person (as close as internet videos ever get, anyway).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Otdj4HdRk8Y
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WholeLottaIzzy
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#21
Any guitar will do it. Just gotta have your amp loud enough. No point buying a guitar just because it feedbacks easily.
Green_Ghoul
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Join date: Aug 2010
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#22
I don't want one just for the feedback, I've always wanted a hollow body guitar. Feedback is just another reason to want one I'm probably not going to buy one anytime soon anyway.

What's a mid-gain amp? Mine's only single channel, if that changes anything...

edit: maybe I'll just get a thinline telecaster and put some lace pickups in it and then just play really, really loud. It'll be cheaper than getting a hollow body....Or I'll just think about it a lot more...I don't know =\
Last edited by Green_Ghoul at Jan 21, 2013,
Ranger01
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#23
You don't need a hollow body for feedback, rip the insulation off your pickguard/ pickups if you want some crazy stuff to happen... my '69 Tele's insulation is near gone and the bridge pickup is so beat to hell it's now microphonic (I can talk into it haha)... That's a lot of how them guys get their feedback, they use old guitars with worn out pickups.

Hell, Neil Young made a whole album off the feedback (and other miscellanea he got from his Les Paul making Weld:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=660yyStdg4U
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Roc8995
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#24
Quote by MrFlibble
Again, it's not about them being 'prone' or not; they're all as 'prone' to feedback as each other. It is simply that the more wood you take out close to the strings, the stronger the feedback effect will sound.

Personally, I thik it is not a good idea to buy a semi-hollow or hollow guitar exclusively for getting more pronounced feedback. If you're not getting feedback with your solid then you won't be getting it with the new guitar, either;

Wait, what? Hollowbodies don't feed back more readily than solidbodies? Am I in crazy town? Why has nobody addressed this?

Hollowbodies for sure feed back quicker and more readily than solidbodies. I've yet to play a solidbody that can feed back even a little bit with my Polytone on 2, but my Gretsch hollowbodies would sit there and howl all day long if you wanted them to. That's anecdotal of course but seriously, hollowbodies on the whole are definitely more prone to feedback than solidbodies.