Wowbanger
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2013
22 IQ
#1
Hi All,
I've got a Yamaha FG 355 SB acoustic which I bought 20 odd years ago. It has been broken in half and glued back together with resin glue and has held for years. Now the bridge is starting to lift and twist, making the action at the bottom of the neck way too high. I thought it might be the neck folding in, but you can see the top where the bridge sits is raised and bowed.
I've had the idea that if I fitted a jazz guitar type tailpiece, that would put the string tension onto the end of the body and the strings would push down to some degree at the bridge and may help lower the action slightly. At least it would stop it getting worse.
Anyone know if that would work?
Thanks
Last edited by Wowbanger at Feb 2, 2013,
RebuildIt
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2011
254 IQ
#3
Yup, a trapeze will alleviate the angle of stress. If its been going like that for too long, the wood may have warped. If so, just taking the pressure off will not be enough. There's a commercial product called Bridge Doctor that you might consider. It attaches a support to the tail block. I haven't used it, but I learned something a bit the same from my Dad. I attach my support to the back of the guitar. There is often a brace across the back at about the same place as the bridge. drill two holes in the bridge about 1/4 or 5/16 inch, and insert dowels into the holes. Pulling the dowels towards the neck from inside the body will correct the warped front panel. The dowels can hook against the back support to keep the right placement. If the support is too far from the neck, you can add a strip to widen the support. If its too close - Rats! I suppose I could try to take pictures of it, but its dark and awkward inside a guitar. I imagine my solution changes the resonance of the back a little, but on the other hand, if you dont fix it you have a nearly useless guitar.
Last edited by RebuildIt at Feb 3, 2013,
Wowbanger
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2013
22 IQ
#4
Thanks Rebuildlt. I was looking at the bridge doctor on line and it looks like it may help. The guitar still sounds amazing consiering the life it's had, so I've got to try something. I get what you mean about your Dad's fix, it sounds like it might work.
fastlanestoner
the nxt NEXT Nigel Tufnel
Join date: Sep 2007
1,341 IQ
#5
I've used the Bridge Doctor on a few repairs and it did its job well
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