DESTROYER5000
Banned
Join date: Dec 2012
835 IQ
#1
I need to know if one can safely change the headstock angle by simulating the headstock failing and then make a new one to the angle you want.
supersac
Tab Contributor
Join date: Aug 2009
630 IQ
#2
...you mean by breaking the headstck? and then making a new one...well i guess you could but you risk breaking the neck beyond repair by doing that it would be easier and alot safer to just cut it
DESTROYER5000
Banned
Join date: Dec 2012
835 IQ
#4
Ok so what I mean is take it to a scroll saw and then where the headstock starts at the back of the neck at a 30 degree angle and then making a new headstock.

My plan : I am building a flying and I have a strat style neck and I hate the headstock so I'm trying to know if I can make a new angled headstock where the previous straight headstock was.
rageahol
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2011
298 IQ
#5
Ye should be grand, but 30° is a really sharp angle for a headstock, 14° is a little more common. Just do a scarf joint. Since it's a Strat-style neck, you shouldn't really have any problems.
DESTROYER5000
Banned
Join date: Dec 2012
835 IQ
#6
Quote by rageahol
Ye should be grand, but 30° is a really sharp angle for a headstock, 14° is a little more common. Just do a scarf joint. Since it's a Strat-style neck, you shouldn't really have any problems.

What I mean is where the cut is at is 15 degrees
but the headstock be 14 degrees, making sense yet?
Last edited by DESTROYER5000 at Feb 9, 2013,
MG_Sora
UG's Industrial Designer
Join date: Mar 2006
61 IQ
#7
Quote by DESTROYER5000
What I mean is where the cut is at is 15 degrees
but the headstock be 14 degrees, making sense yet?

You mean that the angle on the joint is 15° at this point?



like that?
W4RP1G
Please, call me Pig.
Join date: May 2010
2,847 IQ
#8
The less of an angle you have, the more resistant to breakage when dropped it will be. You can get away with a very small angle, like 10° or even 8°.

And you can use a volute as well. A volute is more wood at the truss rod access channel, which is where the breakage is most likely to occur. Also, you can stop your truss rod route before it gets to the end, and then just drill a hole from the headstock into the channel for access(the Fender way). That will decrease the amount of material removed for truss rod access.
DESTROYER5000
Banned
Join date: Dec 2012
835 IQ
#9
Quote by MG_Sora
You mean that the angle on the joint is 15° at this point?



like that?

Like the no2 diagram.