#1
Hey UG, I play a 6string guitar, I hear bands like animals as leaders mainly for the chord voicings and their rhythm stuff at the same time I Love soloing am a big fan of Buckethead and Marco Sfogli and I like the 6 string for leads,

My thing is I would like to have a guitar where I could do lead soloing stuff "AS comfortable as 6 string" but also have the options of nice chord voicings that a guitar with more strings could offer so

any advice on whether I should go 7 or 8 strings ....or stick with my 6 string
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#2
I don't see a reason why you shouldn't at least attempt to make the jump. Go play some sevens, and hopefully some eights if you can as well. You'll never know if you're comfortable with them until you try them out.
#3
Do what I'm doing. Ask around in your area to see if any shops have any 7/8 strings or even (yes, I recommend playing them, too) baritones. One shop said they'd e-mail me when a 7-string came in for me to try out and while it hasn't happened yet I'm pumped for when it does!

In the end, I'll probably buy a 6-string baritone, but it doesn't hurt to just try something new out. So see what you're comfortable with. If you like 6-strings, try a baritone first. If you like that, try a 7-string or even a baritone 7-string. Not enough? Try an 8-string or (sweet jebus) baritone 8-string.

In a nutshell, try.
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#5
I agree with Old Snake there, I got my 7 string love it.

My hands are a little bigger than your average 6 string player and it actually feels incredibly natural having a wider, 7 string neck. 6 string felt really weird after I only played 7 string for a few months though so it is important to play both 6 and 7, or 8 of course.
#6
= ) thanks guys this was very helpful
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#7
If you want to play an eight, get an eight. I jumped from six to eight. If you're waiting to get better on a six-string... you're going about it the wrong way. You will never stop discovering new things. Get the beast you want to play with.

In my case, that happened to be an eight-string. I find having it in drop E just rounds out the instrument so nicely in every way.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#8
Quote by Dayn
If you want to play an eight, get an eight. I jumped from six to eight. If you're waiting to get better on a six-string... you're going about it the wrong way. You will never stop discovering new things. Get the beast you want to play with.

In my case, that happened to be an eight-string. I find having it in drop E just rounds out the instrument so nicely in every way.


you know what ... I think I will try out both 7 and 8 string guitar at a music shop and then decide which one I would like better ... I guess the reason I might be leaning towards 7 over 8 is because I still like the lead stuff I can do with my 6 as far as "Bending" strings and I know with 8 the frets get wider making it harder to do some of the bends and stuff I can do more comfortable with at a 6
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#9
? You mean scale length? You really won't feel a difference for bends. 25.5" is 'standard' and, say, an Ibanez RG2228 is 27". The difference from fret to fret is tiny. 27" is pretty much just an extra fret tacked on at the headstock.

If you're worried about the distance, try this: play what you want on your instrument now... but play it all one fret lower.

That's the difference between 25.5" and 27". Not much difference, is it? It only becomes a problem if you do some extremely wide chords and if you have smaller hands. Try both for sure; but you should barely notice the difference if it's just a 26.5" or 27" scale.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221