Page 5 of 6
#161
Quote by Todd Hart


Stratman goes the whole hog and wins.

I'm not sure he'd be going the whole hog, that's surely not kosher.


(unless that was the pun... in which case... embarrassing...)
#162
Quote by Todd Hart


Stratman goes the whole hog and wins.

Way to shalom it in...

/notsureifshalomkindarhymeswithphone
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
#163
Quote by WCPhils
Way to shalom it in...

/notsureifshalomkindarhymeswithphone


Eh, that takes allah of stretching to make it work.
#164
Quote by Metasponge
I imagine ConcertShooter sitting at his computer crying right now, as the Jews corrupt the one place he thought was a safe haven.

#Pray4ConcertShooter


#eatbaconforconcertshooter
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#165
Quote by MadClownDisease
I'm not sure he'd be going the whole hog, that's surely not kosher.


(unless that was the pun... in which case... embarrassing...)

Embarrassing.

You got done up a Kippur.
#167
Someone please Marx it stop!
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#168
Quote by Todd Hart
Someone please Marx it stop!


Quit your Stalin and don't Lenin me hanging!

/thatwasreallybad
#169
Quote by Morphogenesis26
Eh, that takes allah of stretching to make it work.

yamakaing me crazy

/evenworse
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
#170
Quote by WCPhils
yamakaing me crazy

/evenworse


Worse than the holohoax, but Adolf know what you were going for.
#171
Quote by Morphogenesis26
Worse than the holohoax, but Adolf know what you were going for.

That was just dreidelful.

</weak>

Quote by BladeSlinger
I've been trying to think of a way to use this for a while. You've bested me, sir. We can't turn our Moses up at your puns.



Nice.
--

How do you say "I'm okay" to an answering machine?

--
#173
Quote by Morphogenesis26
This jewry must stop.

Once you matzah the pun, we will stop.


Oh god that was terrible.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#175
Matzah was "master" in that one.

But he schmucked it up.
--

How do you say "I'm okay" to an answering machine?

--
#176
seriously can a mod just ban him already? he's obviously a troll and he spams as well.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#177
Quote by Eastwinn
seriously can a mod just ban him already? he's obviously a troll and he spams as well.
Not a troll and I haven't spammed either, liar. But you would have me banned because "you don't like me." Really no other reason than that.
#178
Quote by ConcertShooter
Not a troll and I haven't spammed either, liar. But you would have me banned because "you don't like me." Really no other reason than that.


You really need to kalam down, man.
#179
Quote by Morphogenesis26
"Africans stay in Africa"
We're all from Africa.
Out of Africa theory is nonsense and has since been disproved.

Re-Examining the "Out of Africa" Theory and the Origin of Europeoids (Caucasoids) in Light of DNA Genealogy

Author(s): Anatole A. Klyosov, Igor L. Rozhanskii

ABSTRACT
Seven thousand five hundred fifty-six (7556) haplotypes of 46 subclades in 17 major haplogroups were considered in terms of their base (ancestral) haplotypes and timespans to their common ancestors, for the purposes of designing of time-balanced haplogroup tree. It was found that African haplogroup A (originated 132,000 ± 12,000 years before present) is very remote time-wise from all other haplogroups, which have a separate common ancestor, named β-haplogroup, and originated 64,000 ± 6000 ybp. It includes a family of Europeoid (Caucasoid) haplogroups from F through T that originated 58,000 ± 5000 ybp. A downstream common ancestor for haplogroup A and β-haplogroup, coined the α-haplogroup emerged 160,000 ± 12,000 ybp. A territorial origin of haplogroups α- and β-remains unknown; however, the most likely origin for each of them is a vast triangle stretched from Central Europe in the west through the Russian Plain to the east and to Levant to the south. Haplogroup B is descended from β-haplogroup (and not from haplogroup A, from which it is very distant, and separated by as much as 123,000 years of “lat- eral” mutational evolution) likely migrated to Africa after 46,000 ybp. The finding that the Europeoid haplogroups did not descend from “African” haplogroups A or B is supported by the fact that bearers of the Europeoid haplogroups, as well as all non-African haplogroups do not carry either SNPs M91, P97, M31, P82, M23, M114, P262, M32, M59, P289, P291, P102, M13, M171, M118 (haplogroup A and its subclades SNPs) or M60, M181, P90 (haplogroup B), as it was shown recently in “Walk through Y” FTDNA Project (the reference is incorporated therein) on several hundred people from various haplogroups.

KEYWORDS
Y Chromosome; Mutations; Haplotypes; Haplogroups; TMRCA; STR; SNP; “Out of Africa”

Cite this paper
Klyosov, A. & Rozhanskii, I. (2012). Re-Examining the "Out of Africa" Theory and the Origin of Europeoids (Caucasoids) in Light of DNA Genealogy. Advances in Anthropology, 2, 80-86. doi: 10.4236/aa.2012.22009.

References

[1] Cruciani, F., Trombetta, B., Sellitto, D., Massaia, A., Destro-Bisol, G., Watson, E., et al. (2010). Human Y chromosome haplogroup R-V88: A paternal genetic record of early mid Holocene trans-Saharan con- nections and the spread of Chadic languages. European Journal of Human Genetics, 18, 800-807.
[2] Cruciani, F., Trombetta, B., Massaia, A., Destro-Bisol, G., Sellitto, D., & Scozzari, R. (2011). A revised root for the human Y chromosomal phylogenetic tree: The origin of patrilineal diversity in Africa. The American Journal of Human Genetics, 88, 1-5. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.05.002
[3] Klyosov, A. A. (2009a). DNA Genealogy, mutation rates, and some historical evidences written in Y-chromosome. I. Basic principles and the method. Journal of Genetic Genealogy, 5, 186-216.
[4] Klyosov, A. A. (2009b). DNA Genealogy, mutation rates, and some historical evidences written in Y-chromosome. II. Walking the map. Journal of Genetic Genealogy, 5, 217-256.
[5] Klyosov, A. A. (2011a). The slowest 22 marker haplotype panel (out of the 67 marker panel) and their mutation rate constants employed for calculations timespans to the most ancient common ancestors. Pro- ceedings of the Russian Academy of DNA Genealogy, 4, 1240-1257.
[6] Klyosov, A. A. (2011b). DNA genealogy of major haplogroups of Y chromosome (Part 1). Proceedings of the Russian Academy of DNA Genealogy, 4, 1258-1283.
[7] Klyosov, A. A. (2012). Ancient history of the Arbins, bearers of hap- logroup R1b, from Central Asia to Europe, 16,000 to 1,500 years before present. Advances in Anthropology, in press.
[8] Rozhanskii, I. (2010). Evaluation оf the сonvergence оf sets in STR phylogeny and analysis оf the haplogroup R1a1 tree. Proceedings of the Russian Academy of DNA Genealogy, 3, 1316-1324.
[9] Rozhanskii, I. L., & Klyosov, A. A. (2011). Mutation rate constants in DNA genealogy (Y chromosome). Advances in Anthropology, 1, 26- 34. doi:10.4236/aa.2011.12005
[10] Simms, T. M., Martinez, E., Herrera, K. J., Wright, M. R., Perez, O. A., Hernandez, M. et al. (2011). Paternal lineages signal distinct genetic contributions from British Loyalists and continental Africans among different Bahamian islands. American Journal of Physical Anthro- pology, 146, 594-608. doi:10.1002/ajpa.21616

http://youtu.be/LpsKbyyI7iE

http://youtu.be/MYAYJEklql4
Last edited by ConcertShooter at Feb 20, 2013,
#180
Quote by Todd Hart
The other man's arse is always cleaner.

It's similar to when people claim that native peoples are more harmonious than we are. American natives, for example, are often touted as 'only killing what they need' and all that crap. People don't acknowledge the fact that before we introduced guns to the American indians they would kill bison by driving entire herds of them off cliffs to such an extent that the piles of dead (and not quite dead) were so large that the ones at the bottom would rot before they could be accessed.

Harmonious.

Edit: Another reason people like to act that we're living in a shit time is that it's very self-affirming for an arrogant mind to be able to go 'Ha, look at how savage and stupid my contemporaries are!'.


Agree. There's a reason a certain period in time was called the "enlightenment age" and we (well at least the western world) stopped that sort of bullshit.
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#181
Quote by ConcertShooter
Not a troll and I haven't spammed either, liar. But you would have me banned because "you don't like me." Really no other reason than that.

I've seen you do triple and quadruple posts over one subject filled with links and shit. That's considered spamming. There's an edit button for a reason.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#183
Quote by BladeSlinger
I've seen you do triple and quadruple posts over one subject filled with links and shit. That's considered spamming. There's an edit button for a reason.
It might be considered spamming by you, but the rest of the world knows that contributing on topic input to a particular thread does not amount to spamming.
#184
Did he seriously just try to claim that we as a species aren't from Africa.

Words... I no have... I... what?
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#185
Quote by Todd Hart
Did he seriously just try to claim that we as a species aren't from Africa.

Words... I no have... I... what?
No, scientist did that. Sorry to burst your unreality. Out of Africa theory is nonsense and has since been disproved.

Re-Examining the "Out of Africa" Theory and the Origin of Europeoids (Caucasoids) in Light of DNA Genealogy

Author(s): Anatole A. Klyosov, Igor L. Rozhanskii

ABSTRACT
Seven thousand five hundred fifty-six (7556) haplotypes of 46 subclades in 17 major haplogroups were considered in terms of their base (ancestral) haplotypes and timespans to their common ancestors, for the purposes of designing of time-balanced haplogroup tree. It was found that African haplogroup A (originated 132,000 ± 12,000 years before present) is very remote time-wise from all other haplogroups, which have a separate common ancestor, named β-haplogroup, and originated 64,000 ± 6000 ybp. It includes a family of Europeoid (Caucasoid) haplogroups from F through T that originated 58,000 ± 5000 ybp. A downstream common ancestor for haplogroup A and β-haplogroup, coined the α-haplogroup emerged 160,000 ± 12,000 ybp. A territorial origin of haplogroups α- and β-remains unknown; however, the most likely origin for each of them is a vast triangle stretched from Central Europe in the west through the Russian Plain to the east and to Levant to the south. Haplogroup B is descended from β-haplogroup (and not from haplogroup A, from which it is very distant, and separated by as much as 123,000 years of “lat- eral” mutational evolution) likely migrated to Africa after 46,000 ybp. The finding that the Europeoid haplogroups did not descend from “African” haplogroups A or B is supported by the fact that bearers of the Europeoid haplogroups, as well as all non-African haplogroups do not carry either SNPs M91, P97, M31, P82, M23, M114, P262, M32, M59, P289, P291, P102, M13, M171, M118 (haplogroup A and its subclades SNPs) or M60, M181, P90 (haplogroup B), as it was shown recently in “Walk through Y” FTDNA Project (the reference is incorporated therein) on several hundred people from various haplogroups.

KEYWORDS
Y Chromosome; Mutations; Haplotypes; Haplogroups; TMRCA; STR; SNP; “Out of Africa”

Cite this paper
Klyosov, A. & Rozhanskii, I. (2012). Re-Examining the "Out of Africa" Theory and the Origin of Europeoids (Caucasoids) in Light of DNA Genealogy. Advances in Anthropology, 2, 80-86. doi: 10.4236/aa.2012.22009.

References

[1] Cruciani, F., Trombetta, B., Sellitto, D., Massaia, A., Destro-Bisol, G., Watson, E., et al. (2010). Human Y chromosome haplogroup R-V88: A paternal genetic record of early mid Holocene trans-Saharan con- nections and the spread of Chadic languages. European Journal of Human Genetics, 18, 800-807.
[2] Cruciani, F., Trombetta, B., Massaia, A., Destro-Bisol, G., Sellitto, D., & Scozzari, R. (2011). A revised root for the human Y chromosomal phylogenetic tree: The origin of patrilineal diversity in Africa. The American Journal of Human Genetics, 88, 1-5. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.05.002
[3] Klyosov, A. A. (2009a). DNA Genealogy, mutation rates, and some historical evidences written in Y-chromosome. I. Basic principles and the method. Journal of Genetic Genealogy, 5, 186-216.
[4] Klyosov, A. A. (2009b). DNA Genealogy, mutation rates, and some historical evidences written in Y-chromosome. II. Walking the map. Journal of Genetic Genealogy, 5, 217-256.
[5] Klyosov, A. A. (2011a). The slowest 22 marker haplotype panel (out of the 67 marker panel) and their mutation rate constants employed for calculations timespans to the most ancient common ancestors. Pro- ceedings of the Russian Academy of DNA Genealogy, 4, 1240-1257.
[6] Klyosov, A. A. (2011b). DNA genealogy of major haplogroups of Y chromosome (Part 1). Proceedings of the Russian Academy of DNA Genealogy, 4, 1258-1283.
[7] Klyosov, A. A. (2012). Ancient history of the Arbins, bearers of hap- logroup R1b, from Central Asia to Europe, 16,000 to 1,500 years before present. Advances in Anthropology, in press.
[8] Rozhanskii, I. (2010). Evaluation оf the сonvergence оf sets in STR phylogeny and analysis оf the haplogroup R1a1 tree. Proceedings of the Russian Academy of DNA Genealogy, 3, 1316-1324.
[9] Rozhanskii, I. L., & Klyosov, A. A. (2011). Mutation rate constants in DNA genealogy (Y chromosome). Advances in Anthropology, 1, 26- 34. doi:10.4236/aa.2011.12005
[10] Simms, T. M., Martinez, E., Herrera, K. J., Wright, M. R., Perez, O. A., Hernandez, M. et al. (2011). Paternal lineages signal distinct genetic contributions from British Loyalists and continental Africans among different Bahamian islands. American Journal of Physical Anthro- pology, 146, 594-608. doi:10.1002/ajpa.21616

http://youtu.be/LpsKbyyI7iE

http://youtu.be/MYAYJEklql4
#186
Quote by ConcertShooter
It might be considered spamming by you, but the rest of the world knows that contributing on topic input to a particular thread does not amount to spamming.

Quote by THE RULES
No double/triple posting
- This means no posting multiple times in a row in a thread. Please use the 'edit post' button wherever possible.
Punishment: Excessive double posting may result in a warning.
hmm...
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
#187
I'm not finding much on that publication you're posting. It doesn't seem to be supported by anyone else in the scientific community. Got anything more concrete? Also, if you do, you can just tell us the name and a quick snippet of the publication/book instead of posting a huge wall of text.
#188
Quote by ConcertShooter
No, scientist did that. Sorry to burst your unreality. Out of Africa theory is nonsense and has since been disproved.


And your proof of this toppling of a widely attested theory is a single abstract? You are aware that abstracts are valueless, right? And that one scientist making some silly paper in which he uses a bunch of made up words has only a smidgen more value than abstracts.

If we weren't of African descent then the fact that we are wouldn't be the overwhelming scientific opinion. Your one person claiming otherwise means nothing, unless you're willing to say the Earth is 6000 years old; there are a lot of people claiming that as well you know.

Edit: And all that the abstract actually claims in that Europeans have another ancestor group which Africans do not, not that humans are not originally from Africa. Though I daresay you didn't bother to actually read it, so I'll let you off. Although the second YouTube video you posted outright confirms that we are of African descent, but admits that Europeans have some level of neanderthal 'within' our DNA that Africans and Asians do not, which isn't an even slightly controversial statement.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
Last edited by Todd Hart at Feb 20, 2013,
#189
Quote by Morphogenesis26
I'm not finding much on that publication you're posting. It doesn't seem to be supported by anyone else in the scientific community. Got anything more concrete? Also, if you do, you can just tell us the name and a quick snippet of the publication/book instead of posting a huge wall of text.
There's enough information there for you to do your own research. I'm not into spoon feeding children.
#190
Quote by ConcertShooter
There's enough information there for you to do your own research. I'm not into spoon feeding children.

Well, I'm definitely inclined to believe you now.
#191
That article doesn't even prove that much for your point. We still have fossils from millions of years ago that show human development in Africa. This paper says that the genetics differ and 150,00 years ago. So we came out of Africa and went elsewhere. That species developed then split. One went to Europe and the other to Africa. Two other branches went elsewhere. That's with my basic genetics understanding. That opposes that everyone directly descends from the African species. All this says is that there was an intermediary that got rid of some Y chromosomal genes.

Europeans are hybrids mostly. That's where red hair comes from.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
Last edited by BladeSlinger at Feb 20, 2013,
#192
Quote by BladeSlinger
That article doesn't even prove that much for your point. We still have fossils from millions of years ago that show human development in Africa. This paper says that the genetics differ and 150,00 years ago. So we came out of Africa and went elsewhere. That species developed then split. One went to Europe and the other to Africa. Two other branches went elsewhere. That's with my basic genetics understanding. That opposes that everyone directly descends from the African species. All this says is that there was an intermediary that got rid of some Y chromosomal genes.


Exactly. None of which is at all that controversial, and none of which goes any way to proving that we aren't an African species.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#193
Quote by Todd Hart
Exactly. None of which is at all that controversial, and none of which goes any way to proving that we aren't an African species.

I found it pretty interesting, personally. He seems to say there's an exit from Africa and a return later during a migration. No telling what it was like when the old and new genes mixed.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#194
Quote by ConcertShooter
There's enough information there for you to do your own research. I'm not into spoon feeding children.

Zing


Come on now, you made this thread; you do the work convincing us, todd makes fun of you for your bullshit. That's how it should work around here.
#195
Re-Examining the “Out of Africa” Theory and the Origin of Europeoids (Caucasoids) in Light of DNA Genealogy

Found in Advances in Anthropology 2012. Vol.2, No.2, 80-86, Published Online May 2012 in SciRes (http://www.SciRP.org/journal/aa).

Click here to obtain the entire study, not just the abstract. It explains how DNA was used to arrive at the conclusion by the two Russian scientists involved.

"Out of Africa" Theory Called Into Question By Originator

"Christopher Stringer is one of the world's foremost paleoanthropologists. He is a founder and most powerful advocate of the leading theory concerning our evolution: Recent African Origin or 'Out of Africa.' He now calls the theory into question: 'I'm thinking a lot about species concepts as applied to humans, about the "Out of Africa" model, and also looking back into Africa itself. I think the idea that modern humans originated in Africa is still a sound concept. Behaviorally and physically, we began our story there, but I've come around to thinking that it wasn't a simple origin. Twenty years ago, I would have argued that our species evolved in one place, maybe in East Africa or South Africa. There was a period of time in just one place where a small population of humans became modern, physically and behaviourally. Isolated and perhaps stressed by climate change, this drove a rapid and punctuational origin for our species. Now I don't think it was that simple, either within or outside of Africa.'"
#196
Quote by whywefight
Zing


Come on now, you made this thread; you do the work convincing us, todd makes fun of you for your bullshit. That's how it should work around here.




edit: ^ Your sources are so bad it makes me cry.

And the fact someone founded a theory doesn't mean they have any right over it.

edit2: and

"Christopher Stringer is one of the world's foremost paleoanthropologists. He is a founder and most powerful advocate of the leading theory concerning our evolution: Recent African Origin or 'Out of Africa.' He now calls the theory into question: 'I'm thinking a lot about species concepts as applied to humans, about the "Out of Africa" model, and also looking back into Africa itself. I think the idea that modern humans originated in Africa is still a sound concept. Behaviorally and physically, we began our story there, but I've come around to thinking that it wasn't a simple origin. Twenty years ago, I would have argued that our species evolved in one place, maybe in East Africa or South Africa. There was a period of time in just one place where a small population of humans became modern, physically and behaviourally. Isolated and perhaps stressed by climate change, this drove a rapid and punctuational origin for our species. Now I don't think it was that simple, either within or outside of Africa.'"


Even your own sources disagree with you.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
Last edited by Todd Hart at Feb 20, 2013,
#199
Quote by ConcertShooter
Stuff

Yea, that's what the last one said. We originate in Africa then developed elsewhere. I'm totally fine with that. We have physical evidence of human ancestors in Africa but we don't have solid proof that we became the current incarnation within Africa entirely. Like the other article said, we start there, leave, branch a few times, then inhabit other place.

Do you even read these?

I kind of hope the Aquatic Ape Theory is right. I saw a TED talk about it.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#200
Quote by Lord_Doku
Atleast there's people trying to disprove old theories, even if they are wrong.


Quote by jrcsgtpeppers

If women can be annoyed there arent any women incongress I should be allowed to be pissed off there are no members of pink floyd or the beatles in congress.