#1
Hey guys, I frequent the GG&A and EG forums a lot and I've never posted in here (So none of you know who I am.

Just thought I'd drop in and ask some Bass related questions for you.

I've noticed (Due to my building of a very small studio in my house) I have no bass yet and I'm considering a few basses, I only have a very limited budget of up to £250 British pounds (I'm in England, so many companies like Agile are out) I'd like to go new if possible (but open to used, it's just that I have no idea what I'd be getting used and I'd have to trust your judgement)

The stuff I'm writing is metal, I am open to other genre's (and I have to be for College, which is fine by me) so what do you guys suggest for basses?

I was looking at the various Dean's and BC Riches for basses. (But I'm guessing you'll tell me to avoid if you're anything like EG is)

Now that's out the way, I'm wondering are there any good tutorials and stuff for various bass genre's) such as Funk and Jazz and stuff. I have a limited knowledge of theory too.

Last question I promise! What's the difference in recording straight into a audio interface by a line in VS an amplifier and which one do you prefer and why?

Thanks very much guys!
#2
recording through a DI more or less is the sound of the guitar. if you use an amp, you get the character or colour to the sound that the amp gives. one method i have used lately due to being strapped for time in the main studio at college, is plugging straight into logic through DI, lay a track down edit it, arrange it and so on, then eventually play it via the computer, through the amp and record that in the live room with a full mic setup. because there is no colouring or hum from the amp when you use a pure DI, you have the option of more control over your playing.
if i had more time and the resources available, i would record through amp and mic and DI simultaneously. with even more time/resources i'll just add more mics to the amp just because i can and hey, it might work out for the better.
in terms of bass, yamaha rbx 375 (or 375 if you want a 5er) i got my 375 for £258 of of GAK and it is a tad magnificent. the active pickups will also give you and edge in metal etc.
as for tutorials/lessons youtube is your friend. a lot of established, well known bassists have dvds out, which have been uploaded. i picked up a lot in terms of groove and beat from the victor wooten dvd and the tm stevens video was also pretty good. there are also loads of lesser known bassists with videos up showing techniques, exercises and a whole manner of useful stuff.
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
Last edited by moody git at Feb 28, 2013,
#3
There's nothing wrong with going second hand. If it's your first bass then you're not going to need a perfect top of the line instrument. Gumtree is your friend. And Ebay.

In terms of BC Richs? Na. There's a damn good reason why the electric guitar section dislikes them as well. It's not a case of prejudice because they are metal specific instruments, they're just not very good. You're paying for a fancy shape and no tone to back it up.


For learning multiple different genres, you should get your theory down first, it's pivotal. Seriously, you have no idea how much easier learning different styles becomes when you know theory.
Think of it like this. If you go in blind with no knowledge of theory then you're going to have to learn a full new style each time, rather than learning the basics and then simply differentiating between them to form different genres.
#4
Yup I wouldn't get too close to Dean or B.C. Rich if I were you. I believe moody git meant to say the Yamaha RBX374 for a 4 string or Yamaha RBX375 for a 5 string, and I second this recommendation, my RBX375 sounds amazing in both my concert band and my punk pop band as well as the occasional metal recording I do.
Also the Squier Vintage Modified series and Classic Vibe series are supposed to be good, as well as the Ibanez SR series.

Best tutorials I've found for bass ever are Scott Devine's videos on youtube (scottsbasslessons). He also has a website with a bunch of extra stuff.
Last edited by chatterbox272 at Mar 14, 2013,
#6
Quote by King Of Suede
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHE6hZU72A4

The only lesson you need on playing funk.

I so Fvcking love that "lesson" Because he doesn't explain sheet, but at the same time, you realize that's the only way of explaining funk. Plus, it makes me laugh my arse off!


... Lots of mispelled cursing, isn't it?
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2
#7
Look into the Squire VM series, great basses at awesome prices, highly recommended on this here forum!!

As for recording, I've always DI'd. I recorded the bass cuts for an EP just last week, and found great tones just using my bass and Vtech 21 pedal, which is a great little amp modeller/tone pedal as well as messing with a Muff'n for fuzz tones, I've just always had better results this way, but try different things out, s'all about the quest for lush tones!
Quote by the humanity
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#8
Quote by moody git
recording through a DI more or less is the sound of the guitar. if you use an amp, you get the character or colour to the sound that the amp gives. one method i have used lately due to being strapped for time in the main studio at college, is plugging straight into logic through DI, lay a track down edit it, arrange it and so on, then eventually play it via the computer, through the amp and record that in the live room with a full mic setup. because there is no colouring or hum from the amp when you use a pure DI, you have the option of more control over your playing.
if i had more time and the resources available, i would record through amp and mic and DI simultaneously. with even more time/resources i'll just add more mics to the amp just because i can and hey, it might work out for the better.



+1. I do some recordings using DI, condenser and low-frequency dynamic microphone simultaneously. Sounds fantastic you have to be careful about phasing and mic placement though.

Seriously. Give some of this shit a listen.

https://soundcloud.com/eddiehimself/slit-wrist-theory-36
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Mar 14, 2013,
#9
Quote by King Of Suede
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHE6hZU72A4

The only lesson you need on playing funk.

"One, two, three, you know... One, you know... You know..."
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
"One, two, three, you know... One, you know... You know..."

Countdown to Epicness!
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2
#11
Ibanez GSR200 (new), possibly a SR300 or 500 used.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.
#12
Jeff Berlin notwithstanding, I'm not a fan of Dean basses. They seem to have ignored their bass line for a while now. They've made a lot of cheap, unimaginative basses in the last few years like the Hillsboro series. B.C. Rich makes some fine basses, but only in the U.S.A. series, which are quite expensive. The only lower-priced B.C. Rich I like is the Mockingbird, but they seem to have discontinued the 5-string model and the last two I saw were bolt-necks with rosewood fretboards, rather than ebony. That was a big disappointment. For your budget, look at the Squier and some of the lower-priced Fenders. You can probably snag a good Ibanez used, and that would serve you well.
"Drinking is a skill and should be recognized as such!"

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#13
Quote by Spanner93
Ibanez GSR200 (new), possibly a SR300 or 500 used.

Bah! I always forget these basses. The SR series is great. I bought an SR-406 as my 2nd bass 7 years ago and still have it and play it to this day. I sometimes prefer it over my $1300 Hohner.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#14
Quote by King Of Suede
Bah! I always forget these basses. The SR series is great. I bought an SR-406 as my 2nd bass 7 years ago and still have it and play it to this day. I sometimes prefer it over my $1300 Hohner.


Yeah, they are great value for money. I still play my $200 GSR190 about as much as my $1100 Hagstrom. Very unassuming but sturdy basses.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.