#1
Hey guys! I've been saving a lot lately and the time has come to plan my next purchases! I have been wanting a recording rig for some time now and have done my research. Below are my choices and would love some opinions and/or recommendations of some alternatives for a cheaper price Money doesn't come by me often so I need to know if my choices are worth the money!

Studio Monitors:
A pair of KRK Rokit RP5 G2's

Interface:
Focusrite Scarlett 2i4

Microphones:
Instrument = Shure Sm57
Vocals - Shure SM58

DAW:
Reaper

A couple of questions:
1) What other stuff does a beginner recording studio NEED?
2) Any cable recommendations?
3) Anyone know any good tutorials for reaper?

Cheers for any help guys!
Main Rig
ESP LTD MH-350NT
Korg Pitchblack > Digitech Bad Monkey
Peavey 6505+ 112 w/ 2x12 (Celestion Vintage 30 and WGS Veteran 30)
[Effects Loop] Boss GE-7 > Boss CE-5 > TC Electronic Flashback
#2
All good, except you don't need an SM57 and an SM58. Unless you need a mic for live vocals (i.e. not recording them, actually live), get an SM57. For recording vocals a decent condenser mic is the better option.

As for the question of what a "beginner studio" really needs, that's why we have an interfaces sticky. As most of your choices are mentioned there, I assume you've read it?
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#3
Answers in Bold

Quote by Carl21221

Studio Monitors:
A pair of KRK Rokit RP5 G2's
No, look into the Equator D5 or Behringer Truth 1030's

Interface:
Focusrite Scarlett 2i4
Solid

Microphones:
Instrument = Shure Sm57
Vocals - Shure SM58
The SM57 is a maybe. First off, the SM57 & SM58 are the same mic. Shure just says the SM58 is better for vocals because of the removable wind screen. Otherwise, you'd buy the same mic twice.

But unless you've got a space where you can crank your amp, its better off just to start with some Free Virtual Amps.

As far as Vocal Mics, look into the Audio Technica AT2035


DAW:
Reaper
Yup

A couple of questions:
1) What other stuff does a beginner recording studio NEED?
Not much that I can think of
2) Any cable recommendations?
Not really. I've never heard the difference between a $5 & $50 cable. Even then, through the Scarlett's preamps, you won't hear it anyways
3) Anyone know any good tutorials for reaper?
Start on Reaper's Site. Also, Google is your friend
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#4
Thanks for the speedy replies!

Quote by GaryBillington
As for the question of what a "beginner studio" really needs, that's why we have an interfaces sticky. As most of your choices are mentioned there, I assume you've read it?


I've read it now, it's explained a lot, thank you

Quote by lockwolf
No, look into the Equator D5 or Behringer Truth 1030's


I'm just curious as to why those are better than the KRK, could you explain? Isn't Behringer hated around UG? (sorry I'm a noob when it comes to recording gear)

Cheers guys!
Main Rig
ESP LTD MH-350NT
Korg Pitchblack > Digitech Bad Monkey
Peavey 6505+ 112 w/ 2x12 (Celestion Vintage 30 and WGS Veteran 30)
[Effects Loop] Boss GE-7 > Boss CE-5 > TC Electronic Flashback
#5
Behringer make the occasional good product, that's one of the things they seem to have got right.

Noticed a pair of studio headphones aren't listed, they'd be a good purchase too. Some people like mixing on them, some don't, but they provide a good alternative monitoring system so you can compare what you've done, it's also a good idea to use them when recording so you can hear what you're doing without any other tracks being picked up by your mic.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
Last edited by GaryBillington at Mar 2, 2013,
#6
The KRK's aren't too liked around here because they aren't very accurate; a very hyped low end.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#7
Behringer is the victim of a lot of rhetoric, but much of it is unfounded hyperbole spouted off by people who have read the rhetoric from other sources and simply parroted it back.

My personal experience with Behringer has been mostly very positive. I have outgrown much of it, but still have some of it too. The only time I've been let down was I bought a mixer that had a channel that died about a week after I got it. It was resolved very successfully, though, and I continued to use that mixer for another three years or so, until I grew out of it.

As Chuck D would say, "don't believe the hype." Just take care of it and it'll do you fine.

I'll +1 the notion of not really needing an SM57 AND an SM58 - at least not when you have other requirements that will require more versatility. Again, maybe look at one of the Behringer large-diaphragm condensers. They're decent enough to get you started. Or you can spend a little more and get a lower-end Rode, like the NT1 or something.

Unfortunately, to buy something that you won't grow out of and will keep for a long, long time, you need to spend a lot more than what you will on any Behringer product. At least Behringer gets you in the door and lets you get to work and learn some skills. If you stick with this whole recording thing, you'll at least know what you're looking for when it's time to upgrade.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Behringer makes some stuff that's total junk and some stuff that's decent--when it works. Which might be forever, or it might only last a few years. I've had very functional Behringer stuff end up malfunctioning on me. Luckily I had the extended warranty, so they just sent me a whole new unit--they don't bother trying to fix it and they didn't even want the old one back.

I still buy Behringer for stuff that doesn't really matter, and when the disposable option makes sense.

About half the Behringer gear I've seen in venues had at least one feature that wasn't working on it.
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Last edited by jetwash69 at Mar 2, 2013,
#9
Quote by axemanchris

I'll +1 the notion of not really needing an SM57 AND an SM58 - at least not when you have other requirements that will require more versatility. Again, maybe look at one of the Behringer large-diaphragm condensers. They're decent enough to get you started. Or you can spend a little more and get a lower-end Rode, like the NT1 or something.


Indeed these vocals were recorded with a Behringer mic a year or two ago. I still have and use it occasionally.

https://soundcloud.com/jstorie/goodbye-satellite-3

Please ignore the really high female vocals at the first 30 seconds I made some mistakes back then :p

---
EDIT: https://soundcloud.com/jstorie/gone <---More of a rock song I used a Behringer Condensor on a few years (ago mix is somewhat spotty though).

EDI2: Just realized I have an acapella clip recorded with the Behringer...

https://soundcloud.com/jstorie/vocal-clip/s-sLRsj
Last edited by FireHawk at Mar 2, 2013,
#10
Quote by FireHawk
Indeed these vocals were recorded with a Behringer mic a year or two ago. I still have and use it occasionally.


Just curious, how did you record the keyboard?

OT, just about any LDC mic will be better than an SM58 for vocals. Also, even though the SM57 and the SM58 have the same cartridge, the SM58's wind screen alters the response curve on it, so they will sound a tiny bit different. The SM57 is a better choice for instruments, and it will also work for live vocals if you need it to.
Quote by shiggityswah

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#11
Quote by jetwash69
Just curious, how did you record the keyboard?

OT, just about any LDC mic will be better than an SM58 for vocals. Also, even though the SM57 and the SM58 have the same cartridge, the SM58's wind screen alters the response curve on it, so they will sound a tiny bit different. The SM57 is a better choice for instruments, and it will also work for live vocals if you need it to.


Keyboard was MIDI ran through Native Instruments Akoustik Piano (now discontinued I believe but maybe rebranded in Komplete 8 as this.)

I then split the MIDI to left and right hands and panned each, then eqed each a little different, then sent that to Cakewalk Sonitus:FX Reverb (very underrated plugin in my opinion).

If using SM57 on vocals for recording though (not sure why) I would make sure to put a pop filter or something in front of it.
#12
Quote by FireHawk
Keyboard was MIDI ran through Native Instruments Akoustik Piano (now discontinued I believe but maybe rebranded in Komplete 8 as

Cool. Thanks.

Quote by FireHawk
If using SM57 on vocals for recording though (not sure why) I would make sure to put a pop filter or something in front of it.


Why? IIRC, despite their name, the pop filters don't do really do that much for plosives; their main purpose is to keep an LDC from getting a saliva shower. Not really an issue for a dynamic. Every time I've seen an SM57 used for vocals it's been live, and never with a pop filter.

One of the few dynamic mics I'd consider for recording vocals is an SM7B, but that's a completely different budget league than what we're discussing ITT.
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
#13
Quote by jetwash69
Cool. Thanks.


Why? IIRC, despite their name, the pop filters don't do really do that much for plosives; their main purpose is to keep an LDC from getting a saliva shower. Not really an issue for a dynamic. Every time I've seen an SM57 used for vocals it's been live, and never with a pop filter.

One of the few dynamic mics I'd consider for recording vocals is an SM7B, but that's a completely different budget league than what we're discussing ITT.


I noticed a difference on my mics when I got pop filters, mainly on smaller plosives. Your not gonna fix your huge ones with just a pop filter though.

With that said if you align a little off-axis you don't really have to worry about plosives.

EDIT: Also taking the head off a SM58 isn't the same as a SM57. Taking the head off of SM58 and head off of SM57 are the same.
Last edited by FireHawk at Mar 2, 2013,
#14
Quote by FireHawk
I noticed a difference on my mics when I got pop filters, mainly on smaller plosives. Your not gonna fix your huge ones with just a pop filter though.

With that said if you align a little off-axis you don't really have to worry about plosives.


OK. Thanks for the clarification.

I've only used dynamics for live vocals or recording scratch tracks. I've never noticed any plosive issues with an SM anything, but my experience is pretty limited compared to guys like CT (aka axemanchris).
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.