#1
Hi folks,


In your opinions(s) what are some good oils for Rosewood fingerboards on a classical?

I've been reading contradictory info on lem oil as some say it affects Rosewood over time and makes it dry out and crack, but others say it's good for it.

I don't want to dry out and crack it but I do want to moisturise/protect the wood and maybe make it slightly more slippery to play on, so do all fingerboard oils achieve more slipperyness and would using any high-quality mineral-oil be as good as a specialist product?

I'd appreciate your thoughts. (On the topic, of course, not just about any random subject like spiders. Or babies. Or spiderbabies.)


Cheers
#2
Well in 45 odd years I've never used any oil, on any of my gats of any kind. However they are always in their cases, and I'm aware of temperature and humidity issues. Cheers
#4
real lemon oil is too acidic to use on fretboards, but most lemon oil you can buy is mostly other ingredients, often including stuff you shouldn't use near a guitar finish. a couple drops once a year of mineral oil works okay, but no reason to use it unless your fretboard is looking dry.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
The guy that does the Frets.Com site (pro repairman) says a little mineral oil when you clean the fretboard.
Mr. Taylor says a little lemon oil won't hurt anything, but he too says "very sparingly".

Me... I've never oiled a fretboard in 30+ years of playing.
#6
Once saw an Antiques Roadshow talking about oils and wood. In no uncertain terms they advised against lemon oil. Puckers up your mouth, and will pucker up a rosewood fretboard. Probably true that they just put the lemon flavoring in to satisfy those out of the know.
#7
Quote by Emster 23
Once saw an Antiques Roadshow talking about oils and wood. In no uncertain terms they advised against lemon oil. Puckers up your mouth, and will pucker up a rosewood fretboard. Probably true that they just put the lemon flavoring in to satisfy those out of the know.
The thing is, the shit "Murphy's" calls "lemon oil", is 99% mineral oil anyway. There's a trace of lemon oil in it, but certainly not enough to do any damage.

That said, it will make your guitar's fretboard smell, "lemony fresh and nice".

And "Murphy's Lemon Oil" is pretty much what everybody buys, isn't it?

I won't use it as a wood polish on any modern guitar finish anyway. They're all mostly "closed coat" finishes, and all mineral oil does is smear them up.

Oiling wood goes back ages. For example, boiled linseed oil was used as a protectant or restorative treatment on old, bare woods, preceding a repaint. "Danish and tung oils are still used as finish coats.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 6, 2013,
#8
Well familiar with those... From making bows. That's how I got into making cigar-box guitars... I figured if I could carve and shape a longbow I could carve a guitar neck.
Pretty much the same techniques work quite well. And lots of guys use those old traditional finishes.
I confess it's modern urethane for me....
#9
Recommend Manson Fingerboard Oil. I apply very sparingly with a cloth maybe once or twice a year.
#10
Hey guys,


Thanks a lot for all your replies. Appreciated. I'm going to look at getting some decent mineral oil, then.

It seems that's the main ingredient for guitar oils. As expected some say it's good to do, others say there's no need.. but I'm the sort of player that's thinking.. why the hell not.
#11
Don't slather it on. Use a small amount on a cloth, rub it in, leave it for a couple of minutes and then give your fingerboard a good hard rub with a cloth to get rid of any residue. If your fingerboard still feels sticky you haven't finished cleaning it off.
I use Dunlop 65 fretboard oil to clean my guitars once or twice a year. There's enough oil in your skin chemistry to keep your fingerboard in good shape for the rest of the time.
#12
Quote by snakestretcher
Don't slather it on. Use a small amount on a cloth, rub it in, leave it for a couple of minutes and then give your fingerboard a good hard rub with a cloth to get rid of any residue. If your fingerboard still feels sticky you haven't finished cleaning it off.
I use Dunlop 65 fretboard oil to clean my guitars once or twice a year. There's enough oil in your skin chemistry to keep your fingerboard in good shape for the rest of the time.


Exactly.