#1
I'm considering switching over to a Linux OS (would be using this), because my PC has a Linux partition anyway since we use it in a lot of my classes. The only thing hindering me is that I'm unsure if there's any decent DAWs in Linux. I use Reaper right now (which doesn't have a Linux version).

So, does anyone know of any DAWs, that are on the level of Reaper in terms of ease of use and functionality, for Linux?
#2
Nope.

There are one or two that exist but they don't come close to REAPER. Linux is the worst platform for Audio Production out of the three main OS'.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#5
I vaguely recall someone saying Ardour was awful... but maybe I was thinking of Krystal.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#6
Quote by chatterbox272
Reaper is supposed to run very well under WINE, otherwise the only other option I know of is Ardour.

Yeah, well...I despise OS emulators.
#7
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Yeah, well...I despise OS emulators.

WINE Isn't An Emulator (that's the old recursive acronym for WINE), it's an actual implementation of the Windows API under Unix-based systems. Sure it's an extra layer between the software and hardware but because of the typical performance increase between Linux and Windows you'll probably end up with better performance.
I would try it (seeing as you already have a Lubuntu partition) and see how well it operates, if it meets your needs then you can safely remove your Windows partition, otherwise you'll know that you need to keep it.
#8
Quote by chatterbox272
WINE Isn't An Emulator (that's the old recursive acronym for WINE), it's an actual implementation of the Windows API under Unix-based systems. Sure it's an extra layer between the software and hardware but because of the typical performance increase between Linux and Windows you'll probably end up with better performance.
I would try it (seeing as you already have a Lubuntu partition) and see how well it operates, if it meets your needs then you can safely remove your Windows partition, otherwise you'll know that you need to keep it.

Agreed. Very knowledgeable and accurate post there.


In a few months things will be a lot better for Linux users...the latest version of Ardour should be out, offering both MIDI and VST support (at the moment you can get versions which do either of these things, but not one that does both).

Bitwig is currently in beta, and looks to be a very polished and professional product.

Harrison Mixbus is the only 'professional' DAW available on Linux at present. It sounds fantastic, is pretty nice to use, and apparently VST support is in the works. No MIDI though, strictly audio.


On the plus side, you can play Team Fortress 2 while you're waiting for a decent Linux DAW to be released...NEED A DISPENSER HERE!
Last edited by kyle62 at Mar 4, 2013,
#9
Quote by chatterbox272
WINE Isn't An Emulator (that's the old recursive acronym for WINE), it's an actual implementation of the Windows API under Unix-based systems. Sure it's an extra layer between the software and hardware but because of the typical performance increase between Linux and Windows you'll probably end up with better performance.

Hmm...that all is true. I was rather simplifying it all.

I do admit I've never actually done anything serious with WINE, so the fact that it may be a performance increase is encouraging.

I would try it (seeing as you already have a Lubuntu partition) and see how well it operates, if it meets your needs then you can safely remove your Windows partition, otherwise you'll know that you need to keep it.

Well, I'll give it a shot. Thanks!
#10
There are a few DAWs in Linux - Ardour, Rosegarden, etc.

One commercial available I know of is this one:
http://www.houstonmusicreviews.com/GearReview/energyXT/energyXT2.5.htm

It ran fine but somehow I couldn't get the sound settings right on it for recording, did manage to get Audacity to record so I am sure it was settings related. This one is platform independent so might be worth a shot. I had Opensuse 11.4 when I tested it.
#11
Quote by diabolical
There are a few DAWs in Linux - Ardour, Rosegarden, etc.

No one's saying there isn't. But they are saying they don't work as well as Reaper or other DAWs (like Pro Tools, Cubase, etc.).

One commercial available I know of is this one:
http://www.houstonmusicreviews.com/GearReview/energyXT/energyXT2.5.htm

Nah, I think I'll just run Reaper through WINE. Thanks anyway.