#2
No. You'll need to get a new halo for it.

JK, no it's not. You need to tighten up the springs a bit. If you look at the flat plate that the saddles are sitting on, that should be parallel with the guitar body.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#4
If it has horns and a pointy stick, probably not.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#6
Quote by eddiehimself
No. You'll need to get a new halo for it.

JK, no it's not. You need to tighten up the springs a bit. If you look at the flat plate that the saddles are sitting on, that should be parallel with the guitar body.


by saddles do u mean the saddles for the action of the plate in which the intonation saddles are sitting on?
#7
Quote by danyal92
by saddles do u mean the saddles for the action of the plate in which the intonation saddles are sitting on?

He means the saddles that can be moved back and forth to set the intonation of the guitar.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#8
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
If it has horns and a pointy stick, probably not.


Except on Dean guitars...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#9
Quote by Arby911
Except on Dean guitars...

That just makes a bad situation worse.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#10
Here's what Ibanez has to say on this issue:

http://www.ibanez.co.jp/world/manual/english/1.pdf

See figure 2.

BTW, in case you weren't already aware, don't adjust the action with the strings under tension. The knife edge and pivot points are not designed to withstand that friction and this will set you up for premature parts failure.

I know many disagree, but it's your trem, so why risk it?

This is actually the leading cause of the Edge III's bad reputation. A lot of times this happens in the guitar shop before you even buy the guitar.
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Mar 5, 2013,
#11
Since that is an Edge 3 you don't want the top of the base-plate to be parallel to the body. You want the bottom of the base-plate to be parallel to the body instead. When you look at the side edge of the base-plate of an Edge 3 it is shaped like a wedge and not flat like an Original Floyd.

I can't see your pic to well since it is a little dark and since it is a Black trem on a black guitar. So I can't really tell if it's set right or not.

Here is a nice clear pic of an Edge 3 that is setup up properly (more or less).
#12
isnt my bridge angle the same as in the manual?

btw does the 12th fret harmonic and 12th fret note have to be exactly equal or is a little difference allowed for intonation? does intonation affect whether the guitar stays in tune?
#13
Quote by danyal92
isnt my bridge angle the same as in the manual?

btw does the 12th fret harmonic and 12th fret note have to be exactly equal or is a little difference allowed for intonation? does intonation affect whether the guitar stays in tune?


It's difficult to tell with the Edge III since the surface you check against is a bit rounded. That's why I sent you the link to the manual, but you're going to have to judge for yourself. It did look close enough for me.

Intonation and tuning stability are 2 different things. Search bar "intonation" for a better understanding. The short answer to the question about them being exactly equal, is yes, exactly equal means that string is properly intonated. Anything else just isn't intonated. You need a very accurate tuner to do this effectively.

As for tuning stability, the biggest part is making sure your strings are stretched completely before locking down the nut. The next part is making sure your claw spring tension = the in-tune string tension at the right trem angle. Finally, putting a little graphite grease (not pencil lead) where the strings contact the saddle will help, too.

I never have to retune my Edge III (or any of my other Floyd Rose) guitars between string changes. If they go through temperature changes that affect tuning, I get it back in tune with the claw springs, not the tuners. If if goes out of tune, then you probably just didn't stretch the strings enough, or didn't have the proper spring tension.

It's extremely simple once you sort it out and dump the BS like "you have to tune the strings in a particular sequence".
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
#14
thank you so much. ill fix the intonation.

what do u mean by BS? btw i cross tune when setting up.

should i try changing my springs?
#15
Quote by Way Cool JR.
Since that is an Edge 3 you don't want the top of the base-plate to be parallel to the body. You want the bottom of the base-plate to be parallel to the body instead. When you look at the side edge of the base-plate of an Edge 3 it is shaped like a wedge and not flat like an Original Floyd.


Ahh ok, well in that case it looks just about right then.

Quote by danyal92
thank you so much. ill fix the intonation.

what do u mean by BS? btw i cross tune when setting up.

should i try changing my springs?


I don't think you need to change your springs. You need to screw in and unscrew the spring claw to get the bridge at the right angle. If you still can't get it right after screwing it in all the way, you will at that point need to add in another spring.

BS is shorthand for the brown stuff that comes out of the back of a male cow
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#16
Quote by danyal92
thank you so much. ill fix the intonation.

what do u mean by BS? btw i cross tune when setting up.

should i try changing my springs?


No need to cross tune--total waste of time and effort. The only thing that matters is having the tension of your springs equal the tension your strings have when the bridge is at the correct angle and the guitar is tuned the way you want it.

The easy way to achieve this is:
- Set the trem to the correct angle and set all the fine tuners to the middle of their travel
- Block it in place at that angle (you can use old guitar picks taped together). Don't jam it too tight
- Change the strings (if it needs it). One at a time or all at once; doesn't matter much, but if you stop with the strings all off and leave it sit more than a day or two, you might have some hassles with neck relief. I can think of few good reasons to have all the strings off at once, and a string change isn't one of them
- For each string, make sure you stretch it, retune, and repeat until it doesn't lose any pitch at all--not even one cent. So you need an accurate tuner--not one of those 5 - 11 LED tuners like are built into a lot of amps or MFX pedals. Also, if you get this, the stretching process will be faster, easier, and you're less likely to break strings: www.stringstretcha.com/ Don't pay attention when they say 2 runs per string--that's just marketing. You'll need to keep doing it until it doesn't lose pitch
- Once all the strings are in perfect tune, lock down the nut
- Correct any changes in the tuning with the fine tuners (when you get really good at it, you'll figure out how to lock the nut without affecting tuning at all--that's an art)
- Adjust the claw screws until the springs balance the tension with the strings (you can tell when both blocks you stuck in earlier are equally easy to remove
- Check tuning again. If it's sharp, then ease the claw screws back a tiny bit at a time until it's perfect (without touching the fine tuners). Do the opposite if it's flat. (Again, once you get really good at it, you'll get the spring tension right without further adjustment, but you should always double check)

And no need to change your springs, either. If you're using a heavy string gauge and you can't get the claw springs tight enough to balance against the strings before the screws bottom out (won't turn anymore), then you'll just need shorter claw screws. I had to do that for my Xiphos when I strung it with skinny top heavy bottom strings. If that's the case, let us know and I'll do a post on how to get the right kind of replacement screws.

If you don't get the right spring tension and try to compensate by "cross-tuning" then you're just going to screw up the bridge angle.

Find that person who told you to cross tune and punch him in the mouth. He's either like that guy who sends the cub scout on his first camping trip out to all the other campsites looking for a left handed smokeshifter--that or he doesn't know what he's doing with a Floyd Rose and needs to shut the **** up about it instead of making people waste their time and get confused for nothing.

I spent more time typing this than it takes me to do the procedure right.
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
#17
i cannot thank you enough for the time you put in to help me. i did re adjust the bridge it stays in tune when bending however fine tuning is required everytime i use the whammy. i tuned it Low E high E, A,B,D,G. it took quite some time for the tuning to be exact when tuning EADGBE so i used that method.

anyway thanks alot
#18
Quote by danyal92
i cannot thank you enough for the time you put in to help me. i did re adjust the bridge it stays in tune when bending however fine tuning is required everytime i use the whammy. i tuned it Low E high E, A,B,D,G. it took quite some time for the tuning to be exact when tuning EADGBE so i used that method.

anyway thanks alot

I'd check 4 things:
1. Are each of the the strings stretched enough? Tune all the strings. Then do another good stretch on each string, immediately re-checking tuning on each one after the stretch you did on it. If any of them go flat, even by a cent, then you haven't stretched the strings enough.
2. Are the nut locks tight enough? Are the string locks in the saddles tight enough?
3. Are you 100% sure the spring tension = the string tension? When you're really close, but not quite there, then the guitar can act like this. Maybe you don't have the two claw screws even with each other enough?
4. If all these other things are good, then you probably have damaged knife edges and/or posts.

Did you buy the guitar new or used? If new, did you break the seal on the guitar box yourself, or had the shop already opened up the box before you? If they opened it, then they might have done a setup. And could have messed up your bridge.

Let us know when you check the first 3 things, if it still won't stay in tune. I have more recommendations, depending on how you answer the questions related to new/used. BTW, even if you bought a "new" one off the wall at the guitar store, that's most likely considered new for warranty purposes.

Standing by...

Edit: Since you say, "i tuned it Low E high E, A,B,D,G. it took quite some time for the tuning to be exact when tuning EADGBE so i used that method," I'll bet the problem is your spring tension still isn't right and/or you weren't blocking the trem to tune it.

Double Edit: In case it wasn't clear, when I say "block" the trem, I mean go into the trem cavity in the back of the guitar and wedge stuff in between the wood and the metal on both sides of the tremolo metal where the springs attach so that it can't move forward or backward. Flip the guitar over to make sure you have it blocked at the correct angle, and if not, then adjust before you move on. BTW, I don't recommend reinstalling the trem cavity cover. If you change strings often enough you'll end up wearing out the screw holes within a few years--just put it in a bag with the screws and keep it someplace safe in case you ever want to sell the guitar.
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Mar 7, 2013,
#19
aryt i gave my strings another good stretch (man thats frustrating:S ), i made sure my claw screws were even enough and the bridge is parallel. i dont know how to check whether the knife edges are damaged or not?

the result is that the guitar stays in tune when normal soloing. though it goes a little out of tune i.e flat by a cent when i play the beat it solo. i use an aroma chromatic tuner. do u think the guitar setup is correct now?

i bought the guitar new, off the wall.

oh btw i thought id mention this though i heard it doesnt matter, my guitar bridge is at an angle i.e my bass side is higher than the treble side i just like to play with the bass action higher.
#20
btw the low E string gets pretty sharp when i lock in the nuts and some time the low E goes out of tune even if i bend it
#21
Quote by danyal92
btw the low E string gets pretty sharp when i lock in the nuts and some time the low E goes out of tune even if i bend it


It's normal for the strings to go sharp when you lock the nut.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#22
Quote by danyal92
oh btw i thought id mention this though i heard it doesnt matter, my guitar bridge is at an angle i.e my bass side is higher than the treble side i just like to play with the bass action higher.


I find they are way more stable when they are setup the same on both sides i.e flat not angled. When they are setup at an angle your knife edges don't sit flat in the post grooves anymore. This will hinder flutters and the bridge returning back to 0 and can also make it feel a little stiffer. If you want the one side to be higher IMO it will be better to shim those saddles and keep the base-plate level.
Last edited by Way Cool JR. at Mar 9, 2013,
#23
Quote by danyal92
btw the low E string gets pretty sharp when i lock in the nuts

If you push the block toward the bridge while you're tightening it, that can help keep it from going sharp (if there's some play, like all the Ibanez locking nuts I've encountered). Otherwise, yeah, that's why you make final adjustments with the bridge tuners before you unblock it.

Quote by danyal92
and some time the low E goes out of tune even if i bend it

I'm assuming by "out of tune" you mean flat?

Bending is just stretching, so it probably means the string wasn't stretched enough. If only one string is going out of tune, then it's either the string stretching or something isn't tight enough--but if it's going out of tune more than a tiny bit, usually it'll drag the others with it.

It's a lot less frustrating when you use this: Stretcha It's less than $18 with shipping, and well worth it IMHO.

Anyway, since the guitar was off the wall, chances are the shop did some setup, and if there's also a good chance it had some significant whammy abuse, even if the arm wasn't in it when you found it.

Sounds like you're going to have to adjust the action, so go ahead and:
- unlock the nut
- loosen the strings at the tuning pegs until they're slack
- take some pliers and remove the springs from the claw
- remove the trem

Now you can check out the posts. If you see any horizontal wear marks along the fulcrum point anywhere other than exactly where the kife edges contacted it, then someone had adjusted the action with the strings under tension, and there's a good chance your Edge III will fail prematurely, if it hasn't already.

Go ahead and adjust your action to level the bridge and put it back together. The shim idea is a good recommendation, IMHO.

Anyway, if you saw the wear I'm talking about (and if you didn't adjust the action yourself with the strings under tension) and if you bought the guitar less than a year ago, I'd contact the store and/or Ibanez and try to get them to replace the trem and posts under the warranty.

If you did the adjustment with the strings under tension yourself, then that would probably void the warranty, and now you have an expensive lesson learned the hard way. The cheapest I've seen Edge III replacements go for is $200.

I'll let you check it out and post status before I say more. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you that you don't find any damage on those posts...
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
#24
Quote by jetwash69
It's difficult to tell with the Edge III since the surface you check against is a bit rounded. That's why I sent you the link to the manual, but you're going to have to judge for yourself. It did look close enough for me.

Intonation and tuning stability are 2 different things. Search bar "intonation" for a better understanding. The short answer to the question about them being exactly equal, is yes, exactly equal means that string is properly intonated. Anything else just isn't intonated. You need a very accurate tuner to do this effectively.

As for tuning stability, the biggest part is making sure your strings are stretched completely before locking down the nut. The next part is making sure your claw spring tension = the in-tune string tension at the right trem angle. Finally, putting a little graphite grease (not pencil lead) where the strings contact the saddle will help, too.

I never have to retune my Edge III (or any of my other Floyd Rose) guitars between string changes. If they go through temperature changes that affect tuning, I get it back in tune with the claw springs, not the tuners. If if goes out of tune, then you probably just didn't stretch the strings enough, or didn't have the proper spring tension.

It's extremely simple once you sort it out and dump the BS like "you have to tune the strings in a particular sequence".


I've never heard of anyone retuning a Guitar that way.By all rights it should work,but does that also pull the bridge up if you are screwing the claw in?Or lower the bridge if unscrewing the claw??You have me a bit confused on this subject.Also as far as the correct angle,i always use the tuning machines and spring claw to tune and reset the angle of bridge.When I do a string change.I always have the back of the bridge angled to right about the thickness of a Dime.Usually just a little less.Idea of tuning with the spring claw has me curious enough to give it a try..Anyway thanks for the interesting idea,i will be giving it a try when needed.
#25
Necrobump, man
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#26
MAKE SURE YOUR STUDS WHERE THE KNIFE EDGES RIDE HAVE NO SIDE TO SIDE MOVEMENT WHEN THERE
IS NO PRESSURE ON THEM. THIS IS CRITICAL FOR TUNING STABILITY. Take up any slop with red Loc-tite or teflon tape or better yet replace with locking studs! Make sure knife edge and stud contact areas are free of burrs and lightly lubed. I have had years of trouble free hard use from my edge 3's .