#1
hi.
i have a cort g210 electric guitar,and the pickups are just pure crap.
so i want to upgrade,and there are LOTs of options.
after some research,i chose dimarzio the breed for the bridge and Stratocaster Tex-Mex Pickup for the middle.
i want a good sound for playing blues and some country/rock n roll.
however i want to listen to some professionals before buying.
so any help would be appreciated.
btw what's with this [forbidden link] ? why can't i post links?
Last edited by s3p3hr at Mar 8, 2013,
#2
The Tex-Mex isn't a particularly great pickup. Basically it's a 'flatter' sounding Texas Special. Also, Fender pickups tend to be slightly overpriced compared to the Seymour Duncan or DiMarzio equivalent and they are made with opposite phase to other brands' pickups. You can correct this by reversing the phase of the Breed, but it's an annoying thing to have to keep doing and keeping track of.

I wouldn't particularly recommend the Breed either, unless you really need the extra output (for example, if you're trying to drive a single-channel valve amp harder). It will completely overpower any single coils you use with it. For "blues and some country/rock n roll" a better choice would be just a slightly warmer PAF-style pickup, like a Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates, Alnico II Pro Slash or DiMarzio Air Norton; you could also try a Seymour Duncan 59/Custom Hybrid or Breed Neck, if you really need a bit more output.

It would help to know what amp you have (remember, your amp defines your tone much more than your pickups do), but as a starting point I would go for a SD Pearly Gates in the bridge, a Twang Banger or Five-Two in the middle and a Custom Flat or Custom Staggered (depends how you like your pole pieces) in the neck. That way you've got classic tones with just a tiny bit more output and bite to them in every position—with a little variation to play to the positions' strengths—so you can get every kind of tone on the blues-rock-country spectrum without having to do much more than move the pickup selector switch.
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#3
Quote by MrFlibble
The Tex-Mex isn't a particularly great pickup. Basically it's a 'flatter' sounding Texas Special. Also, Fender pickups tend to be slightly overpriced compared to the Seymour Duncan or DiMarzio equivalent and they are made with opposite phase to other brands' pickups. You can correct this by reversing the phase of the Breed, but it's an annoying thing to have to keep doing and keeping track of.

I wouldn't particularly recommend the Breed either, unless you really need the extra output (for example, if you're trying to drive a single-channel valve amp harder). It will completely overpower any single coils you use with it. For "blues and some country/rock n roll" a better choice would be just a slightly warmer PAF-style pickup, like a Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates, Alnico II Pro Slash or DiMarzio Air Norton; you could also try a Seymour Duncan 59/Custom Hybrid or Breed Neck, if you really need a bit more output.

It would help to know what amp you have (remember, your amp defines your tone much more than your pickups do), but as a starting point I would go for a SD Pearly Gates in the bridge, a Twang Banger or Five-Two in the middle and a Custom Flat or Custom Staggered (depends how you like your pole pieces) in the neck. That way you've got classic tones with just a tiny bit more output and bite to them in every position—with a little variation to play to the positions' strengths—so you can get every kind of tone on the blues-rock-country spectrum without having to do much more than move the pickup selector switch.


thanks for the very detailed answer
i decided to get a Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 Pearly Gates for bridge,Twang Banger for the middle and seymour duncan custom staggered ssl-5 for neck.
i have some questions:
what do you mean by (depends how you like your pole pieces) ?
and is Pearly Gates f spaced?should i get a f spaced?i'm confused.
#4
The SD Custom single coil comes 'Flat' or 'Staggered'; this refers to the height of the pole pieces. The idea is that if your guitar has a very curved fretboard then you should buy 'Staggered' and if your fretboard is very flat then you shoudl buy the 'Flat', so the height of the pickup's pole pieces is matched to the height of the strings and the curve of the fretboard. Some people really like the uneven sound of a 'flat' pickup with a curved fretboard or a 'staggered' pickup with a flat fretboard, though, so really it's personal preference. If you don't know which you might like then it's best to just go with what matches your guitar. For a guitar with a fretboard of 9.5" radius or smaller, go for 'Staggered'. If your guitar's fretboard is flatter than that, go for 'flat'.

As for F spacing, that depends on the bridge of your guitar. If you can, measure the distance between the 1st and 6th strings at the bridge of your guitar. If they are more than 50mm apart, buy an f-space pickup. If they are 50mm or less apart, buy regular spacing. The only difference between them is making sure the pole pieces of the pickup line up properly under the strings. There's no real problem with using a standard-spaced pickup in an f-spaced guitar or an f-spaced one in a standard-spaced guitar, it just ensures you definitely get the output of all the strings to match. It's basically the same thing as the flat/staggered options.

Because your guitar has a 9.5" radius fretboard and a Fender-style bridge (that's where the 'F' in f-spaced comes from), you should probably buy the Staggered version of the single coil pickups and the f-spaced (also known as 'trembucker') version of the bridge humbucker. The other versions would work fine, it's just that staggered/f-spaced would be 'traditional' for that sort of guitar.
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