#1
I break a guitar string almost every time i have band practice.
Yesterday, i broke 1 guitar string and changed it. But later on while playing, i broke 2 strings in quick succession. Thats 3 strings in only one night.
Here is some back story.
I change strings not in sets- I change strings that have broken only. I know this is sort of the "Band-aid" solution, and could be the problem. I am going to start changing strings in sets now. When one breaks, I'll change them all.
I use Ernie Ball Super Slinkys, .10's. I am considering changing strings, and also considering changing string gauge.
So what can I do to make string breaks less likely? Anything I can do with the nut, I grease the nut with graphite already but maybe something else?
Or the bridge, anything I can do with the bridge? I own an american strat, a Gibson LP 60's reissue, and an SX strat from rondo music.
thank you for your time!
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio 60's Tribute
SX stratocaster
MIA Fender Stratocaster
Vox AD50 Vox AC15C1 Vox AC30CC2X Laney LH50r
Guitar>Joe Bonamossa Crybaby > AquaPuss> Sparkle Drive> Green Rhino> DejaVibe> Amplifier
CROWN VIC
#2
Make sure you're wrapping the string correctly around the tuning peg when installing it, on the bridge check for rough edges on the saddles, Does it happen on Any of your guitars?

If so, then make sure that you aren't tuning way too high for the strings to take it, don't have too much tension on the truss rod, And that you aren't strumming/picking way too hard, Or any combination of those
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#3
I used to break EB strings all the time too, swapped to Elixir, problem solved. They last shitloads longer too. Are you buying your strings from a reputable dealer? If buying online you may possibly be purchasing rip offs of the originals. Believe it or not the chinese make 'replicas' of name brand strings now.
#4
Hmmm, I did buy 12 packs of ernie ball super slinky's from amazon.com for only about $4 each. That could be it.

But they come in a verified package and everything! How do I know they are fake?
I'll definitely check my saddles for any hard and rough edges, because the break does typically occur at the bridge.
Thanks for the advice though guys
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio 60's Tribute
SX stratocaster
MIA Fender Stratocaster
Vox AD50 Vox AC15C1 Vox AC30CC2X Laney LH50r
Guitar>Joe Bonamossa Crybaby > AquaPuss> Sparkle Drive> Green Rhino> DejaVibe> Amplifier
CROWN VIC
#5
The strings arent fake. I also use the EB 12 pack bulk buy also. It's the only way to buy. The strings are fine

Common point of break is at the bridge, mainly due to saddle roughness or 'knife edge'. Need to check every one of them.

I used to have an issue with my D string on my Flying V. It was the only string that would ever break. It always broke first, everytime and always broke before what would be a reasonable amount of time and always broke at the bridge end.

Turns out the D saddle was worn and rough. One or two soft passes with a round needle file in the saddle groove and a smooth with some fine sandpaper.....problem solved.
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Last edited by Phoenix V at Mar 8, 2013,
#6
So can you direct me to how to get these saddles not so sharp and harsh?
If you can, I'd like a link to either a tutorial or a picture of those items you mentioned. Soft passes with a round needle file? Unfortunately, I don't know what that is. And how fine of a sandpaper are we talking about?
Thank you,
Adam
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio 60's Tribute
SX stratocaster
MIA Fender Stratocaster
Vox AD50 Vox AC15C1 Vox AC30CC2X Laney LH50r
Guitar>Joe Bonamossa Crybaby > AquaPuss> Sparkle Drive> Green Rhino> DejaVibe> Amplifier
CROWN VIC
#7
This is a small, round, fine cut needle file:



And fine sand paper would be in the 600 to 800 grit range. Essentially you are filing off the sharp edges and then polishing it smooth with the file. Soft passes mean that you apply just enough pressure to make the file cut the metal.

Think of it as filing a sharp edge off of your fingernail. You only want to take enough off to remove the sharpness, not grind it down to a nub.