#1
I currently have 9-42 strings on my guitar and I want to switch to 10-52 (Ernie Ball Cobalts) to see how it feels and sounds. Should I have the truss rod adjusted? I'm thinking that I should, but I wonder what the 'rule' is.

I may do it anyway because I feel like the guitar could use a good setup, I don't think it's ever been since it left the factory, the previous owner didn't play much, it was shipped to me... the intonation could use some improvement, etc... but my main concern is the truss rod. Should I have it adjusted for such a gauge change? And if I decide 10-52 is too much and I try a lighter gauge like 10-46, surely that's too small of a change to need adjusting again, right? Somehow I feel like you need adjusting if you go from 9-42 to like 11-56 or higher for example...
#2
Well it's really up to you, personally I prefer my relief and action to both be as low as possible, so I adjust my guitars as such, switch the string gauge and see how your neck reacts, then adjust accordingly.
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#3
Measure the neck curvature before you change the strings. Measure again after. If it changed much then get your allen wrench out and crank that ****er.
#4
Quote by OliveG
I currently have 9-42 strings on my guitar and I want to switch to 10-52 (Ernie Ball Cobalts) to see how it feels and sounds. Should I have the truss rod adjusted? I'm thinking that I should, but I wonder what the 'rule' is.

I may do it anyway because I feel like the guitar could use a good setup, I don't think it's ever been since it left the factory, the previous owner didn't play much, it was shipped to me... the intonation could use some improvement, etc... but my main concern is the truss rod. Should I have it adjusted for such a gauge change? And if I decide 10-52 is too much and I try a lighter gauge like 10-46, surely that's too small of a change to need adjusting again, right? Somehow I feel like you need adjusting if you go from 9-42 to like 11-56 or higher for example...


it seems that most people are worried about adjusting.

it isn't a scary thing, you really don't need to worry about it. as long as you go the right direction when you turn the head, or too much in not enough time. personally if i am adjusting a truss rod, i don't do it over a tad over a 1/4 rotation, then see where you are at the next day, and see if another is adequate, i don't think i have ever needed to adjust the truss rod more than 3/4 turn to get it where i like it.

just pay attention to what you are doing and you will be fine.
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#5
So basically I can change the strings and worry about it later? Say for example try out for a couple of weeks and if I decide I like it then I can worry about setting the neck then? Long-term warping might be an issue?

Thanks for the answers!
#6
swap one string at a time and check out the
setup thread after if you feel you have any
specific issues after swapping.
Jenneh

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#7
It takes a bit of time for the wood in the neck to respond to changes, whether it be environmental, tension, etc. String it up and see how it plays; take measurement beforehand if you can or are that worried about it, play and then check after half an hour, or an hour, or a day and see if it's changed significantly. I had to tighten my truss rod after going from a .009 set to a .011 set, but only about a quarter turn.
Given a infinite number of monkeys strumming on an infinite number of guitars, eventually they will end up playing Stairway.
#8
The likelihood of needing to adjust your truss rod is practically 0. Many folks here feel the need to adjust it at the slightest change to anything. I have never understood it. Seriously though, if you notice changes dramatic enough to warrant a truss rod adjustment due to such a minor change to your strings, your guitar has much bigger issues.
#9
Well, turns out that 10-52 feels really, really good... seriously, people should try it! :-D It doesn't feel too stiff at all, I don't know if it's because I'm used to playing an E/A which has strings which seem to indicate a stronger gauge (I don't know if they can be compared...), but I love it!