#1
Hi all.

I'm really trying to expand my fretboard, chord, and scale/note knowledge. I recently started exploring the CAGED method. The problem I've run into - I can't play the C chord when moving out of the open position due to an extremely short pinky finger.

I've been playing for a long time and this is the first physical limitation I've had (in the sense of not being able to do it). My pinky mutes the 4th string no matter how I position my hand and thumb. I just don't have enough length to arch it around the string a all. This isn't one of the "keep practicing and you can make it work" deals - I've always conquered those. This is a physical limitation.

So...point of all this - how important to learning and using the CAGED methodology is actually being able to play the C shaped chords? I plan to understand it, know the fingerings and notes...can even play modified version of the chord I think...just can't play the actual chord. Would this hinder or defeat being able to apply the methodology?
#3
Try to find a different way to voice the chord? I don't know man if your hands can't do it they can't do it
#4
Quote by Mole351
Hi all.

I'm really trying to expand my fretboard, chord, and scale/note knowledge. I recently started exploring the CAGED method. The problem I've run into - I can't play the C chord when moving out of the open position due to an extremely short pinky finger.

I've been playing for a long time and this is the first physical limitation I've had (in the sense of not being able to do it). My pinky mutes the 4th string no matter how I position my hand and thumb. I just don't have enough length to arch it around the string a all. This isn't one of the "keep practicing and you can make it work" deals - I've always conquered those. This is a physical limitation.

So...point of all this - how important to learning and using the CAGED methodology is actually being able to play the C shaped chords? I plan to understand it, know the fingerings and notes...can even play modified version of the chord I think...just can't play the actual chord. Would this hinder or defeat being able to apply the methodology?

No it won't hinder you. (Well maybe it will restrict in certain songs but you'll figure that out when you get to it.)

It is good to be able to play the chords but if you can't, you can't.

The idea is to know where the chord is and how it relates to the scale and how it relates to the D shape before it and the A shape that follows so that you can tie everything together.
Si
#5
Quote by Mole351

So...point of all this - how important to learning and using the CAGED methodology is actually being able to play the C shaped chords? I plan to understand it, know the fingerings and notes...can even play modified version of the chord I think...just can't play the actual chord. Would this hinder or defeat being able to apply the methodology?


It's irrelevant to learning the CAGED method.

But why don't you just play your C chord with your index, middle, and ring fingers?
#6
Thanks all for the feedback.

Quote by HotspurJr
It's irrelevant to learning the CAGED method.

But why don't you just play your C chord with your index, middle, and ring fingers?


I do...it's the C shaped chord as I travel up the neck where I have to bar with index and shape "C" with other 3 fingers