#2
Is it a maple neck? Sounds like a weird question but maple trees sometimes grow up in a twist, which can give the wood or your banjo neck a twist as well. This is what makes curly maple. Sometimes this causes small voids within the grain of the wood that can "unwind" over time. It doesn't happen often with instruments but it does happen. IMO a tech would be better because its probably gonna need a new neck.

This is only for a maple neck. I'm not really familiar with imperfections in other tone woods.
#3
Quote by kd8dqk
Is it a maple neck? Sounds like a weird question but maple trees sometimes grow up in a twist, which can give the wood or your banjo neck a twist as well.

Perhaps this would be the cause of TS' problem is the neck of his guitar was still a tree.
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#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Perhaps this would be the cause of TS' problem is the neck of his guitar was still a tree.


Ok, evidently someone doesn't understand where wood comes from.

Some of us know that wood, including wood for banjo necks, does come from trees. This wood, that comes from trees, keeps some of the characteristics of the tree that it came from. This can be a good thing, meaning it can be strong or nice to look at, or it can be a bad thing. So technically speaking, the banjo neck is still part of a tree.

Maybe you have a better solution?
#5
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#6
Quote by kd8dqk
Ok, evidently someone doesn't understand where wood comes from.

Some of us know that wood, including wood for banjo necks, does come from trees. This wood, that comes from trees, keeps some of the characteristics of the tree that it came from. This can be a good thing, meaning it can be strong or nice to look at, or it can be a bad thing. So technically speaking, the banjo neck is still part of a tree.

Maybe you have a better solution?

My point is that wood doesn't grow when it's a guitar neck, so your theory that maple trees twist as they grow is anything but the cause of TS' problem. If you really want me to spell it out to you, the reason why the wood isn't growing is because the wood is dead! Who would've guessed that, eh?
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 11, 2013,
#7
12 years in the forestry industry hasn't taught me anything about trees or the wood they produce. You are actually correct that a banjo neck is not a tree. However, as the cells in the wood die the piece of wood dries out. When it dries completely, a process known as "curing", the twist that developed when the wood was once part of a tree relaxes and twists backward, or "unwinds". If this twist goes unnoticed in a piece of wood in an instrument factory, situations like this can develop later.

But, I won't argue with you like a child. You have your mind made up that I am wrong and have no clue what I'm talking about. I'll leave you to it. You win your petty little argument. I admit defeat.
Last edited by kd8dqk at Mar 12, 2013,