#1
Just like the title said what are your opinions? I'm thinking about getting one I wish they made the standard one but the special doesn't look too bad. Should I try to find a regular one used? Are they even worth it?
#2
I think as with a lot of lower-priced Gibsons, they can be a bit hit-and-miss as regards quality.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#3
They are OK guitars, but nothing special at all. You should be able to get a new one for $299ish
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#4
What's the feel like I used to have a les paul and didn't like the feel but I loved the sound
#5
Quote by Robbgnarly
They are OK guitars, but nothing special at all. You should be able to get a new one for $299ish


The $300 Melody Makers is just Gibson blowing out some especially shitty guitars it made in 2011. The reason they’re still around it that even at steep discounts people don’t want them.

New low-end Gibsons aren’t worth the money. A Melody Maker is just a cheap guitar with nice pickups thrown in that costs you a lot of money because it says Gibson on the headstock. You can get a better guitar from Schecter or ESP for the same money. But if you can find one used or on clearance it might be a good deal.
#6
Why not go for a nice Epi model instead? Pup replacements if you aren't happy with the sound?
Silverburst
#7
Get a junior. They can be fantastic guitars. Maybe rip out the electronics and upgrade them.
#8
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
Get a junior. They can be fantastic guitars. Maybe rip out the electronics and upgrade them.


+1.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#9
Quote by jpnyc
A Melody Maker is just a cheap guitar with nice pickups thrown in that costs you a lot of money because it says Gibson on the headstock.

they are cheap, relative to other gibsons and other american made guitars, but that's because they are stripped down to only what is required for them to be able to function as a musical instrument. they are not cheap in the same way epiphone les paul special IIs are cheap.

generally, the build quality is significantly better than most other guitars in the price range. Of course, most other guitars in the price range offer better features which might be more useful to a lot of people.

if you just want a good quality, basic no-frills guitar that you can just plug in and play, and don't need a neck pickup or adjustable saddles or anything like that, the melody maker is a pretty good choice. Just make sure you try before you buy - there's not much consistency in gibson's production line.

edit: ^+1 to the junior suggestion. more expensive, but definitely worth it
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#10
An older Melody Maker (2003-2008) can be nice if it's what you want.
Also, the real vintage ones can sound great, again, if it's your cup of tea.
#11
Quote by I K0nijn I
Also, the real vintage ones can sound great, again, if it's your cup of tea.


Aren't the vintage ones worth like big $$$ though? Might as well go for the whole hog if you can afford one of them!
Silverburst
#12
Depends on features, state, etc.
I've seen some of them go at less than a thousand, others over 3K.

They're worth quite some cash, but in the end, they're still Melody Makers and they aren't highly sought after really.
#13
Quote by Blompcube
generally, the build quality is significantly better than most other guitars in the price range.


No it’s not. The fretwork on cheap Gibsons sucks and the finishes are awful. The parts might be better than what you would find on an MIM Fender or a Squier, but not what you’ll find on a lot of guitars from Ibanez, ESP, or Schecter.
#14
Personally I don't think they look all that great. I've not played one though so I can't comment on the playability.
#15
Quote by grantjames
I've not played one though so I can't comment on the playability.


The necks feel great. But the frets ends are a mess and the frets are poorly polished and often just flat instead of crowned. So it seems great until you try to play a slide.
#16
Quote by jpnyc
No it’s not. The fretwork on cheap Gibsons sucks and the finishes are awful. The parts might be better than what you would find on an MIM Fender or a Squier, but not what you’ll find on a lot of guitars from Ibanez, ESP, or Schecter.


Hit or miss man, some are good while others are awful, you can't generalize with Gibson.
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#17
Honestly I'm kinda torn now lol I went and played one and it has its problems but overall I wasn't a bad guitar. I'm a strat man and always have been but I actually really liked the feel of it. Didn't have any problems with frets the pup would have to be replaced with a p90 but all in all not totally awful. I think it would definitely serve my purpose as I'm pretty much just looking for a cheap guitar to carry around everywhere, and to serve as as backup, backup giging guitar lol honestly I think I'm either going to Bite the bullet on it or pick up the newer melody maker special
#18
Quote by jpnyc
No it’s not. The fretwork on cheap Gibsons sucks and the finishes are awful. The parts might be better than what you would find on an MIM Fender or a Squier, but not what you’ll find on a lot of guitars from Ibanez, ESP, or Schecter.

The fret work can be hit and miss, which is why i said 'try before you buy'. and granted, the finishes are consistently cheap, but that's because it's one of the things they are compromising to reduce costs.

the quality of the raw materials and the build is still pretty close to gibson's usual standards, or at least has been with most melody makers i've played. There's just a lot less wood due to the thinner bodies and the narrower headstocks, less time spent on the finish, less routing required, less hardware to attach etc. this is what reduces the cost. Meanwhile, fender sells even more cheaply made MIM esquires for around £100 more and nobody complains

TS, if you were just going to replace the pickup with a P90 it seems to make sense to just save a bit more and get a les paul junior, imo
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#19
My Melody Maker other low end Gibsons play and sound better then any import in the price range.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#20
Quote by Bhaok
My Melody Maker other low end Gibsons play and sound better then any import in the price range.

This is just a really stupid remark
It comes down to individual instruments
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#21
I'm slighlty worried that nobody has asked which kind of 'Melody Maker' the OP is asking about, because there's several and they're totally different.

Right now there are three types: original-style, which is like a Les Paul Junior with a thinner body, smaller headstock and larger pickguard; Melody Maker Special, which is the same as before but with two P-90 pickups; and the Melody Maker series of guitars, which are 'Specials' with solid maple bodies.

None of them are going to be master-crafted instruments made of the finest woods, but they do get the same fret and nut treatments that any other production Gibson gets, so they typically play nicely enough. Similarly the pickups, pots, tuners, jacks and bridges are all the same sort of thing that a normal Studio/Special/Faded/etc gets.

The main difference is that the Melody Maker series is made of solid maple, making them weigh more, have a much, much brighter tone and of course, keeping the cost down. An original (or original-style) Melody Maker/MM Special has a Mahogany body and are slimmer than the normal Les Paul sizes, making them lighter and giving them a tone more in keeping with an SG than a Les Paul.
The original Melody Maker only comes in a Les Paul or Les Paul Double Cut shape with a single coil pickup, a 300k volume control and a 500k tone control. The Melody Maker Special uses two soapbar P-90 pickups and adds a pickup selector switch, has a full-size headstock and is otherwise the same as the standard Melody Maker. The Melody Maker series only come with a single humbucker and a single 300k volume control, and can be had in LP, SG, V and Explorer body shapes.

There also used to be a Joan Jett model, which was the same as a regular, original-style Melody Maker, but with a humbucker instead of the single coil. There was also a version of the standard Melody Maker made with two Fender-style pickups, though this has also been discontinued.

tl;dr version:
Melody Maker = Les Paul Junior with a more Fender-style pickup.
Melody Maker Special = Les Paul Junior with two P-90s.
Melody Maker series = LP/SG/V/X 'Juniors' with much heavier and brighter-toned bodies.
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#22
Quote by MrFlibble
I'm slighlty worried that nobody has asked which kind of 'Melody Maker' the OP is asking about, because there's several and they're totally different.

Right now there are three types: original-style, which is like a Les Paul Junior with a thinner body, smaller headstock and larger pickguard; Melody Maker Special, which is the same as before but with two P-90 pickups; and the Melody Maker series of guitars, which are 'Specials' with solid maple bodies.

None of them are going to be master-crafted instruments made of the finest woods, but they do get the same fret and nut treatments that any other production Gibson gets, so they typically play nicely enough. Similarly the pickups, pots, tuners, jacks and bridges are all the same sort of thing that a normal Studio/Special/Faded/etc gets.

The main difference is that the Melody Maker series is made of solid maple, making them weigh more, have a much, much brighter tone and of course, keeping the cost down. An original (or original-style) Melody Maker/MM Special has a Mahogany body and are slimmer than the normal Les Paul sizes, making them lighter and giving them a tone more in keeping with an SG than a Les Paul.
The original Melody Maker only comes in a Les Paul or Les Paul Double Cut shape with a single coil pickup, a 300k volume control and a 500k tone control. The Melody Maker Special uses two soapbar P-90 pickups and adds a pickup selector switch, has a full-size headstock and is otherwise the same as the standard Melody Maker. The Melody Maker series only come with a single humbucker and a single 300k volume control, and can be had in LP, SG, V and Explorer body shapes.

There also used to be a Joan Jett model, which was the same as a regular, original-style Melody Maker, but with a humbucker instead of the single coil. There was also a version of the standard Melody Maker made with two Fender-style pickups, though this has also been discontinued.

tl;dr version:
Melody Maker = Les Paul Junior with a more Fender-style pickup.
Melody Maker Special = Les Paul Junior with two P-90s.
Melody Maker series = LP/SG/V/X 'Juniors' with much heavier and brighter-toned bodies.


i ronically you answered the question i was about to ask before i asked it, which was the size of the junior body because honestly the main thing that attracted me to it was the the smaller body size. and i was talking about the original melody maker but the availability of the original is kind of low so if i cant find one ill prolly settle for the special
#23
My old shop had one of each of the modern maple melody makers. A V, SG, Explorer, and LP. They were all equally shit.
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#24
Quote by Robbgnarly
This is just a really stupid remark
It comes down to individual instruments


You attack me personally why?? Does my opinion strike a nerve? You think I have played every single guitar on planet Earth don't you? Ok I will re-phrase the statment.

My Melody Maker and other low end Gibson guitars play and sound better then any imported guitar in the same price range. I HAVE PLAYED PERSONALLY WITH MY 2 HUMAN 4 FINGERED HANDS!
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#25
Quote by Bhaok
You attack me personally why?? Does my opinion strike a nerve? You think I have played every single guitar on planet Earth don't you? Ok I will re-phrase the statment.

My Melody Maker and other low end Gibson guitars play and sound better then any imported guitar in the same price range. I HAVE PLAYED PERSONALLY WITH MY 2 HUMAN 4 FINGERED HANDS!

This is a bad post.
#26
My first guitar was a '60 Melody Maker: 2 pickups (popsicle stick? plain black, look like single coil strat without the poles), single cutaway, 2 vol, 2 tone controls. Got it when I was 15, with fake alligator case for $65. Sold it next year for a more fancy git: '59 Gretsch double anni for $150.
MM bought in 65, sold in 66. Never impressed even stupid me that much. Liked it better than my friends cheesy Danelectro, however.
Now I see them used for $1500 at GC. Much rather get a used Gretsch Tennesee Rose for the same or less.
Last edited by Emster 23 at Mar 11, 2013,
#27
Quote by JustRooster
My old shop had one of each of the modern maple melody makers. A V, SG, Explorer, and LP. They were all equally shit.


I own a Melody Maker V, I think it's great.

No finish flaws, frets are fine, setup was fine and the pickup is a screamer. It plays like butter, I even prefer it over more expensive Flying V's. I don't doubt some lemons are out there, but I love mine. Most people moan about the finish but I see it as a preference thing, I like the satin look. If someone really wants it to be shiny they can buff and polish it, or buck up and spend money on a different guitar
#28
Just because you like it doesn't make it not shit. Plenty of people like Phil Collins.
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Last edited by JustRooster at Mar 11, 2013,