#1
Why do I see modes explained in two different ways? I see people saying that a mode is the scale starting on a different degree (which is what I understood them to be), but I also see people saying that Lydian has a #4 and Mixolydian has a b7 etc. (I have a planet waves iPod app that shows the modes this way as well).

Which is the correct way? or is there something I am completely missing?

Thanks! -Adam

update: Thanks for the people that gave a reasonable answer!
Last edited by TheEelsAnkle at Mar 13, 2013,
#2
Yeah s'all 'bout the brand name buddy.

I don't understand why people become obsessed with modes at a certain point in their musical development, cuz I never did.
Last edited by mdc at Mar 11, 2013,
#3
That, my friend, is the biggest discussion on the whole UG lesson section.
Just read some different opinions and chosse what makes the most sense to you.
#4
I have just always learnt that each mode follows the chord it's related too.

@mdc: I totally agree, I learnt the majority of my modes but never took much interest in them. For me, it kinda takes the fun out of playing live.
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#5
1) Modes are not scales. Scales are something applicable to tonal music. Modes are part of the realm of modal music. Think of music as having two types: modal and tonal. 95% of music is tonal.

2) Many people use modes as scales, which is fine as long as they know they're using modes as scales and in a tonal manner.

Anyway, what you're talking about sounds like people saying that various intervals are flat or sharp. In other words, if we think of the modes as having notes, we have the following:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7
(for the Ionian mode; a.k.a. the "major scale" in tonal music).

Therefore, for the Lydian mode, we have the following:
1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, & 7.

For Mixolydian:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & b7.

Start thinking of everything in terms of intervals. The first note is "1", because we start there. The second interval is one note higher than first. And so on.


Make sense?
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Mar 11, 2013,
#6
Quote by mdc
Yeah s'all 'bout the brand name buddy.

I don't understand why people become obsessed with modes at a certain point in their musical development, cuz I never did.


Basically it's because most of the internet labels them as an integral part of basic music theory.
#8
What you mentioned is just two different ways of looking at modes. When someone says, "scale starting on different note" they mean that c major has the same notes as D Dorian, E phyrgian, etc. Starting on different notes. When someone talks about #4 or b7 etc. They mean that if you take the C major scale and sharp the fourth tone you create the C Lydian mode. It's just 2 different ways to go about describing the same thing.

That's the technical side, but the more important aspect is what good does this information do for your playing? In most conventional cases trying to apply modes to music can be quite cumbersome.
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Last edited by J-Dawg158 at Mar 11, 2013,
#9
ugh my dick hurts
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#11
i'm not in CANADA i can't just GO TO THE DOCTOR cause i FEEL LIKE IT
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#13
Crazysam- An Ionian is : 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 A Mixolydian is: 5,6,7,1,2,3,4 and a lydian is: 4,5,6,7,1,2,3 The modes are based on the Major scale. Since the Major Scale formula is 1,2,3,4,5,6,7, say a Dorian mode, would start on the 2nd degree OF THE MAJOR SCALE, it would be 2,3,4,5,6,7,1. None of the notes change their values except for what octave they're played in. The order of notes ascending/descending changes with each mode.

That's the way I learned it...

Or are describing what J-dawg said?

Are you sure you're not confusing the KEY of music with scale formulas? Because no matter what key has what for sharps and flats that you might be playing in, that doesn't change the formula of the major scale and it's degrees.

However, all of that changes if you want to add accidentals...

I totally agree with you on learning it by intervals though. If you can "feel" your way around the fretboard, you can gain a deeper understand of things sonically.
Last edited by Dimarzio45 at Mar 11, 2013,
#14
jesus you have modes ALL wrong dimarzio get off youtube you idiot
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#15
Quote by Hail
jesus you have modes ALL wrong dimarzio get off youtube you idiot


Then inform me, smartass.
#17
hey its this thread again

heres the answer im going to start giving people on modes


dont study modes until you understand tonal music enough so modes actually make sense end then youll see why they arent being used much anymore
#18
Modes are nice to know. But, for some people, it limits their playing dramatically.
#19
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
1) Modes are not scales. Scales are something applicable to tonal music. Modes are part of the realm of modal music. Think of music as having two types: modal and tonal. 95% of music is tonal.


modes, by definition, are scales.
most modal music has a tonal center, so it is tonal.
modal music is tonal, but tonal music isnt necessarily modal.
Atonal music is music without a tonal center. this means no note is perceived as tonic.
the two types of music are tonal and atonal. modal falls under the tonal realm.
#21
Quote by ciano16
modes, by definition, are scales.
most modal music has a tonal center, so it is tonal.
modal music is tonal, but tonal music isnt necessarily modal.
Atonal music is music without a tonal center. this means no note is perceived as tonic.
the two types of music are tonal and atonal. modal falls under the tonal realm.


Very well put. I should've just said it that way. LOL