#1
Good time of day, Pit. We need to talk.

I, like many of you, will soon be graduating and am currently looking for jobs. There is one question on my mind that I am having trouble answering:

Should I, or shouldn't I, apply for jobs in engineering?

Engineering jobs offer a good salary but are extremely competitive. Every employer expects me to be "passionate", which I am not. Also, I'm worried about the contract period. If it turns out that the job sucks, I won't be able to leave for a certain number of years. It's a big commitment, not to mention the stress levels associated with that line of work.

On the other hand, I could get a more modest job in a different sector. One of my friends graduated with an engineering degree, but he does a part-time office job to save money to travel around world. This idea appeals to me because it doesn't seem to be as much of a "ball and chain". He says his job is really easy, and frankly I'd prefer a job that's too easy over a job that's too hard, even if it doesn't pay well.

However, if I don't go after an engineering job straight after graduating, it's going to be even more difficult to get one later, when I have forgotten everything I've learned and have to deal with a new generation of graduates.

I imagine many of you have been in similar situations. Any suggestions?
inb4 first world problems arent real problems
Last edited by sashki at Mar 11, 2013,
#2
If you get an engineering job your dick will be forever dry [unless you start to branch out (lol)]
#4
Quote by genghisgandhi
If you get an engineering job your dick will be forever dry [unless you start to branch out (lol)]


What if he engineers a dick wetting device?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#5
Quote by theogonia777
What if he engineers a dick wetting device?



Already done. It's called the fleshlight.
#6
Quote by theogonia777
What if he engineers a dick wetting device?

Already done, it's called a mouth
#7
Quote by jugglingfreak
Already done. It's called the fleshlight.


No, this would be completely different. It would be made from a vegetable.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#8
Quote by genghisgandhi
If you get an engineering job your dick will be forever dry [unless you start to branch out (lol)]

That's probably gonna be the case regardless of where I work
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It's "ball and chain."

Fixed, sorry about that.
#10
Quote by CoreysMonster
It's a way of life.

This is what I'm worried about. I don't want to make that big a commitment to something I don't even enjoy doing.

My degree is in electrical and electronic engineering.
#11
what kind of engineering? depending on that, it's still possible to find a good job that isn't too stressful. and you don't have to show you're super passionate, i'd say 'interested' is enough.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#13
This is what happens when you stick it out in a program you don't have a passion for.
TO ALL MY KILLERS AND MY HUNDRED DOLLAR BILLERS...
...TO EMO KIDS THAT GOT TOO MANY FEELINGS
#14
Quote by sashki
This is what I'm worried about. I don't want to make that big a commitment to something I don't even enjoy doing.

My degree is in electrical and electronic engineering.


Mah nigga, do what you enjoy in life.
#15
Quote by Philip_pepper
Mah nigga, do what you enjoy in life.

Nobody will pay me to do that. I need a job to be able to do what I enjoy.
Quote by So-Cal
Of course you should ****ing apply.

I am ****ing applying but I don't know if it's what I really want.
Last edited by sashki at Mar 11, 2013,
#18
Oh, what you might wanna try doing is asking LordBishek or Jackal58 about engineering, and how they found the work to be. Talking to people who actually work in the field might give you some perspective.

Also, how the hell did you manage to stick through a full degree of engineering without actually wanting to work as one?
#20
Quote by CoreysMonster
Oh, what you might wanna try doing is asking LordBishek or Jackal58 about engineering, and how they found the work to be. Talking to people who actually work in the field might give you some perspective.

Also, how the hell did you manage to stick through a full degree of engineering without actually wanting to work as one?

I don't enjoy it but I can't think of anything else that I could do. I chose the lesser evil and stuck with it because I felt like I had to, at least in order to get a job. My grades are more or less average.
#21
I've been told over and over to go for a mechanical engineering degree or something like it because of my high testing scores and grades and all that, but I won't. I know I'm fully capable to do virtually anything that I want to do, especially engineering, but I don't want to. What will I settle for? Machining. Lower pay, yes, but more fun for me.

As a machinist, I would make the parts the mechanical engineer designs (possibly) and I could make my own custom parts, so I could be my own personal engineer anyway. It's all up to you, I've done a little machining and I think I could stand to do that for years to come, but I know I wouldn't like just engineering.

Make sure you're happy with what you're doing, if you have the potential to be an engineer, you shouldn't have trouble finding something you can enjoy.
Save a trip to the RT!
Quote by blake1221
If there's anything to take away from this thread, anything at all, it's to always cup the balls.


Top trolling abilities.

Quote by caeser1156
God dammit you had me 10/10
#26
Travel the world my friend.

Along your trip you will find your path.


EDIT: That sounded like a joke answer but it wasn't intended as such. You're young! Get out there whilst you still got no responsibilities or commitments!

Plenty of time for a soul destroying job. 40 odd years probably!
Last edited by fender_696 at Mar 11, 2013,
#27
Quote by sashki
I got research experience and it was lame, but that probably doesn't count.

Oh, yeah, lab jobs are shitty. I don't know anyone who's enjoyed one.
#28
Quote by fender_696

Plenty of time for a soul destroying job. 40 odd years probably!

But if I don't get a soul destroying job now, I never will, and I'll regret it.

Are you folks all genuinely passionate about your jobs? Do you wake up every morning, creaming your jeans with excitement about going to work? I personally don't know anyone who's like that. It seems to me like only a few lucky people have found "their calling" in life and manage to earn a living doing it.
Last edited by sashki at Mar 11, 2013,
#30
Quote by sashki
But if I don't get a soul destroying job now, I never will, and I'll regret it.

Are you folks all genuinely passionate about your jobs? Do you wake up every morning, creaming your jeans with excitement about going to work? I personally don't know anyone who's like that. It seems to me like only a few lucky people have found "their calling" in life and manage to earn a living doing it.

Maybe it's my youthful optimism, but I personally think that you can be passionate about and enjoy lots of different things. You don't have to have your number one ultimate passion, that is perfect and above all other things, to enjoy your job. Heck, one of my favorite jobs I've had was working as a kitchen bitch washing dishes.

I think that with a positive outlook, you can find a myriad of things you can enjoy doing.

I've found that the greatest job satisfaction always came from jobs where I could see the results of my efforts, like the food going out or the program running correctly. With those jobs, even a long, hard day feels satisfying.

The jobs that were soul-sucking were things like data entry or telemarketing. *brrr*
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Mar 11, 2013,
#31
Quote by sashki
, it's going to be even more difficult to get one later, when I have forgotten everything I've learned and have to deal with a new generation of graduates.



Wait a second, you actually learned something at uni? I must be doing something wrong.
#32
Quote by sashki
But if I don't get a soul destroying job now, I never will, and I'll regret it.

Are you folks all genuinely passionate about your jobs? Do you wake up every morning, creaming your jeans with excitement about going to work? I personally don't know anyone who's like that. It seems to me like only a few lucky people have found "their calling" in life and manage to earn a living doing it.

lol fuck no I'm at work right now. But it's just an intern job so I don't really do anything exciting anyway.
#34
Quote by Avedas
Quote by Sashki
I got research experience and it was lame, but that probably doesn't count.
Oh, yeah, lab jobs are shitty. I don't know anyone who's enjoyed one.

Really? I'm on a research placement now and it's bloody amazing. Only thing that makes my degree worthwhile.
However it is worth noting that I work at the coolest research place ever, researching sound analysis and synthesis and shit, so maybe it's not representative of everything else.
#35
Quote by CoreysMonster
Maybe it's my youthful optimism, but I personally think that you can be passionate about and enjoy lots of different things. You don't have to have your number one ultimate passion, that is perfect and above all other things, to enjoy your job. Heck, one of my favorite jobs I've had was working as a kitchen bitch washing dishes.

I think that with a positive outlook, you can find a myriad of things you can enjoy doing.

I've found that the greatest job satisfaction always came from jobs where I could see the results of my efforts, like the food going out or the program running correctly. With those jobs, even a long, hard day feels satisfying.

The jobs that were soul-sucking were things like data entry or telemarketing. *brrr*

Could not have said it better . I'm 16. I'm a cashier at a Safeway. Most people would say that I have a very boring and mundane job but I love it because I have a positive attitude about it.
e-married to Jack (bladez)
#36
Quote by sashki
But if I don't get a soul destroying job now, I never will, and I'll regret it.
Rubbish.

How old are you?
#38


Why would you go to school for a program, when your not sure if you want to work in the field?
Play Loud! Play Fast! Play Raw!
#39
Quote by Adam808
Why would you go to school for a program, when your not sure if you want to work in the field?

Because I was under the impression that getting a degree would get me more employment prospects, regardless of whether or not it's in the same field.
People study english and history, even though those degrees don't guarantee a job.

I don't have a particular "ideal job" so I'm just going for the best that I can get.

I'd rather work in an office than in a coal mine.