#1
Got this Suzuki SST-10 for a pretty good price around this time two months ago.

Never did open the backplate before, but since I wanted to add springs and bring down the bridge (thinking of hardtailing it even), I opened it up and saw the tremolo claw wasn't straight:



Is this supposed to be normal?
#2
Not a huge deal. You can adjust all that by tightening or loosening the 2 screws. Since you want to bring down your bridge anyway, just tighten them in all the way.
YA GOTTA HIT IT ON THE ONE
pics of gear updated on profile 11/16/09
#3
Quote by GOLDIE93
Not a huge deal. You can adjust all that by tightening or loosening the 2 screws. Since you want to bring down your bridge anyway, just tighten them in all the way.


Ah I see.
Thanks.

Was actually wondering if that might have had anything to do with that annoying saddle rattling/metal-scratch-metal sound I keep getting over the past 2 days when I play 10th fret on the G string.
#4
I can't see it affecting your sound or making a rattle unless it is loose and sloppy.

More than likely it is fret buzz, but it could be something else rattling like a tuner.

I have found in the past that certain notes no matter where I play them on the neck can cause that. Best thing to do is keep hitting the note and let it ring out and press on different parts of the guitar as you do this and see if it stops. It has something to do with the frequency of specific notes that can cause a rattle.

Example my Hagstrom would have this weird rattle/vibration whenever I played a D note anywhere on the fret board. It turned out to be a loose screw on the pick guard that just happened to make the pickguard vibrate against the pick up mounting ring.
YA GOTTA HIT IT ON THE ONE
pics of gear updated on profile 11/16/09
#5
Not so keen on the Suzuki SST-10: much prefer the GSX1300R myself.

Seriously though, that spring claw looks like it's already pretty far back. If you want to bring the bridge down any further, you may have to add another spring to the trem.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Mar 12, 2013,
#6
Quote by GOLDIE93
I can't see it affecting your sound or making a rattle unless it is loose and sloppy.

More than likely it is fret buzz, but it could be something else rattling like a tuner.

I have found in the past that certain notes no matter where I play them on the neck can cause that. Best thing to do is keep hitting the note and let it ring out and press on different parts of the guitar as you do this and see if it stops. It has something to do with the frequency of specific notes that can cause a rattle.

Example my Hagstrom would have this weird rattle/vibration whenever I played a D note anywhere on the fret board. It turned out to be a loose screw on the pick guard that just happened to make the pickguard vibrate against the pick up mounting ring.


Hmm.. I'll check the pickguard itself.

I checked the action and the truss rod yesterday. Nothing was really wrong with it.

I'm kinda suspecting the saddle itself though, since the sound seems to be coming from there. When I press down on the saddle and play on the 10th fret of the G string, the sound disappears.

Quote by eddiehimself
Not so keen on the Suzuki SST-10: much prefer the GSX1300R myself.

Seriously though, that spring claw looks like it's already pretty far back. If you want to bring the bridge down any further, you may have to add another spring to the trem.


The spring claw is default to that. Never opened the cavity before till yesterday.
The bridge is a little slanted away from the neck currently.

But I'm still thinking of hardtailing it. Would it be for the better or worse if I do so?
#7
Quote by parkel42

The spring claw is default to that. Never opened the cavity before till yesterday.
The bridge is a little slanted away from the neck currently.

But I'm still thinking of hardtailing it. Would it be for the better or worse if I do so?


The important thing about floating trems is that they should be parallel to the body. If you want to block it off, you can pretty easily do it by getting a couple of bits of wood and filling in the voids between the block and the trem cavity. Once you've done that, you might as well just get rid of the springs since all they really do is make noise when you don't want them to. The only issue with that is you'll have to run a wire from your spring claw to the bridge block to make sure the bridge is still grounded.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Mar 13, 2013,
#8
Quote by eddiehimself
The important thing about floating trems is that they should be parallel to the body. If you want to block it off, you can pretty easily do it by getting a couple of bits of wood and filling in the voids between the block and the trem cavity. Once you've done that, you might as well just get rid of the springs since all they really do is make noise when you don't want them to. The only issue with that is you'll have to run a wire from your spring claw to the bridge block to make sure the bridge is still grounded.


I see. I might be taking it down to the shop for them to hardtail it for me though. Can't seem to get the springs off myself.

And I kinda fixed the problem of the saddle rattling by readjusting my action.
But now another one comes along.

Whenever I bend the G string (and only the G string, doesn't happen to other strings) anywhere in between the 5th to the 10th fret, a slight knocking sound can be heard at the saddle. Not obvious when unplugged, but well, when plugged in it makes a weird low screeching sound.

Does anyone know what's wrong?

Oh and GOLDIE93, I followed your advice and checked the pickguard. Screws are all tight. Everything points mostly to the saddle. Yeah... That problem up there. ><
#9
Atleast now you know where the issue was coming from. Not sure how to solve your new problem though.

As for hardtailing it. It should be fairly simple as based on the pics I have seen, it looks like a regular strat tremolo, not a floating one. When I did mine, I just jammed an old 9 volt battery between the back side of the trem block and the body of the guitar. Tightened all the screw in and voila. The battery stops it from tilting forward and the body of the guitar stops it from tilting back. The springs should still have tension on them and won't need to be removed. So you don't need to move your ground wire. I don't necesarily endorse using a battery, and not all pockets are the same size so it may not work on yours. So just get a piece of hardwood and cut to fit.
YA GOTTA HIT IT ON THE ONE
pics of gear updated on profile 11/16/09
#10
Quote by GOLDIE93

As for hardtailing it. It should be fairly simple as based on the pics I have seen, it looks like a regular strat tremolo, not a floating one.


You're right. It would be actually if it's a strat copy
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."