#1
I tried taking into consideration the advice I got from the last thread and worked on this last night / today. I worked on the tone a bit to try and make it less raspy and I think I got it down, hopefully. Also I tuned my guitar to drop D and made sure it was tuned. ALSO tried adding some more 'uniqueness' I guess to the piece, but with my skill I'm afraid this as unique as I can come up with.

Any additional tips would be great!

AJ

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#2
It's pretty mushy. Everything is in everything else's space. I'd consider using some EQ to carve each instrument a space sonically.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

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#3
Quote by Artemis Entreri
It's pretty mushy. Everything is in everything else's space. I'd consider using some EQ to carve each instrument a space sonically.

I realized it was really mushy and fuzzfilled after listening to it again. Are you able to explain in a nutshell what EQ does? I tried looking it up and it seems like there is no simple answer for my simple mind.
#4
Well, simply it lets you change the volume of specific frequencies or frequency ranges depending on how good the EQ is/it's specific purpose. Ideally you only use it to cut frequencies but this is an outdated policy. For an example. With a 4 piece band: drummer, bassist, guitarist and singer... The drums occupy a lot of the space so they're kind of difficult but ideally you would scoop out a place for the bass guitar in the kick drum or vice versa.
There are special things you can do like using a side chain compressor but that's a different matter. Next you would make the guitar and the bass not interfere with each other. This usually involves cutting the low end on the guitar and the upper mid range on the bass. The low end of the bass will fill out the guitar and you won't miss the upper mids of the bass. The vocals and guitar also generally occupy a similar space. You need to find where the vocals sit and carve a little space in the guitar for them. This is very general.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#5
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Well, simply it lets you change the volume of specific frequencies or frequency ranges depending on how good the EQ is/it's specific purpose. Ideally you only use it to cut frequencies but this is an outdated policy. For an example. With a 4 piece band: drummer, bassist, guitarist and singer... The drums occupy a lot of the space so they're kind of difficult but ideally you would scoop out a place for the bass guitar in the kick drum or vice versa.
There are special things you can do like using a side chain compressor but that's a different matter. Next you would make the guitar and the bass not interfere with each other. This usually involves cutting the low end on the guitar and the upper mid range on the bass. The low end of the bass will fill out the guitar and you won't miss the upper mids of the bass. The vocals and guitar also generally occupy a similar space. You need to find where the vocals sit and carve a little space in the guitar for them. This is very general.


Okay it's starting to make sense, I appreciate it!