#1
Hey!

I'm at the end of my 3rd year in High School, turning 19 this March, and I just can't decide what to do afterwards. So far I'm considering two studies that lies within my interests.

1. Music Technology. Though I haven't worked with or learned about any programs relevant to music technology, I find it interesting and useful for me as a musician. I do not feel this is a job that is very ... important, and I don't think there's many jobs available since a studio doesn't need that many people working with this. I think it's very risky to go for since income is very unstable. It is, however, something I believe will be a very fun and interesting job, since it involves music. I love all kinds of music and I really want to work with music. I may have to go to a private school to do this, and that's extremely expensive! But I am almost willing to do it, wouldn't it be for the "risky" job opportunities. Are there maybe someone on here that study or work with music technology whom can give me some advice or tips?

2. Another thing I found a little interest for is the English language. As you may have discovered through this post, my vocabulary and grammar is far from good, and the English language is the only thing I've really enjoyed in school so far. This will be more "safe" than music technology since I can possibly get a teaching job.

Okay, these are my interests. I do feel I choose a kind of useless line of work, since none of the above are something that can help the world with problems such as poverty... but these are the things I can see as manageable.

I'm wondering if anyone have some advices or tips on what to do after High School, even though I know the choise eventually must be mine. Thanks in advance!
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#2
Holy **** you are old for a high school student.
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If women can be annoyed there arent any women incongress I should be allowed to be pissed off there are no members of pink floyd or the beatles in congress.
#3
Quote by TunerAddict
Holy **** you are old for a high school student.


Maybe I got it wrong ... maybe it's not called High School when I'm studying years 16-18 of my life, but I'm almost certain it ain't college, cause that's where I'm going after summer!

Lol, I'm already embarrasing myself of how much I don't know about the school system.
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
Last edited by ThrashLife at Mar 14, 2013,
#4
if it's what you really wanna do then do it

if you want a well paying job and good career prospects then choose something a litle more academic and which has practical value
#5
i do it. its cool and stuff. you should do it too.
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#6
If you don't have any experience doing it, how do you know you want to do it?

I'd been mucking around producing stuff for years before I got on my course
#7
Quote by willT08
If you don't have any experience doing it, how do you know you want to do it?

I'd been mucking around producing stuff for years before I got on my course


It just seems interesting! Learning how to record and produse a record and mixing and mastering is just something I could imagine myself doing. I actually bought an older version of Cubase and tried to learn a bit by plugging my guitar into a soundcard and record, but I didn't get Cubase LE .. I figured I need some sort of teacing to get it right.
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#9
Music Tech graduate here. It's good for making connections, and getting to know how the industry works, but getting a job in a studio is difficult. If you do decide to go for that, start applying for jobs and internships before you graduate.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#10
I'm normally a member of the "music tech degrees are pretty much worthless" camp. Though there are definitely outliers that have pulled in some very nice jobs. As with most things, its about the extra effort you put in outside the classroom. Projects, internships, networking. They're all equally (if not more) important as school work.

But OP, where exactly are you from?
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Don't argue with my new deity.
#11
I am currently doing Music Tech. I've learnt tons from it, but 2 of the most important things about it I learnt by getting experience in venues.
1: Studio jobs are incredibly hard to come by. The market at the moment means that there is little money to be had in recording, I'm sure the time will come again, but that's anyone's guess when. The top studios will only employ engineers with the highest degree of audio technology based knowledge and will only employ them with many years experience under their belt.

2: Getting work experience is one of the best things you can do. I took a shot in the dark November 2011 by asking The Darkness' sound tech about live audio. I was taken along to a couple of shows and was taught the basics of running the sound at a gig. He also gave me a small number of highly useful contacts whom have proved invaluable when it came to getting more experience.

They say it's all about who you know, not what you know.

But even if you know all the right guys, you still won't be taken on if you suck.
Silverburst
#12
Be careful of which course you do. The one I'm currently doing may give me incredibly interesting insights into the technicalities of the physics of music, and stuff of that ilk. But I've hardly learnt how to record tracks at professional standard. I don't know how to use rack FX (which is where you'd have your reverbs, compressions, limiters; all I'll use is software).

Getting jobs is nigh impossible. It's a very saturated field with people who are far more qualified with decades more experience than you'll ever have.
#13
Music Tech student here. I personally am sick of all the dubstep producing kids and metal wankers on my course. I'm on it because I'm interested in a career in research in that area after uni. However, universities need dubstep kids to fund their researchers and genuinely interested students (at least in the UK), so disregard this post.

Serious advice though, it's not all about recording and producing music (thankfully), so maybe look at the modules you'd be doing before you apply.