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#2
Same way your Squier is cheap. Fender makes many different strats in a lot of price ranges that vary in quality.
#3
Fair enough, but is there any particular reason in this case? I'm probably making the rookie mistake of assuming anything with the Stratocaster name on it has some inherent quality (which might not be true), but is $399 (or whatever the non-sale price is) the kind of price that should scare me away from the guitar?
#5
It is a made-in-Mexico Strat without any bells and whistles. US$400.00 is about average for such an instrument. Give one a try. They're pretty good guitars.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
I guess what I'm trying to figure out from those with more experience is whether or not this justifies a purchase. I'd really like to step up to a Strat, but given a price difference of only $200 or so, is it really different enough from a Squier to be worth it at this price?

I'm a beginner who's finally verging on "solid intermediate" so I'd like to get a guitar to reflect that, and one that I can plan on playing for a few years to come without worrying about having to upgrade in the immediate future.
#7
Yes. They're much better.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#8
It's a fender standard, not an AMERICAN standard. This means it was maybe made in Mexico. It should be okay, you may have to get it set up. Also the frets may not be dressed as perfectly. Make sure the pickups that come with what you buy are the exact ones you want tho. At this price range that is probably the most important aspect of the guitar.
#9
Quote by sonofgkex
It's a fender standard, not an AMERICAN standard. This means it was maybe made in Mexico. It should be okay, you may have to get it set up. Also the frets may not be dressed as perfectly. Make sure the pickups that come with what you buy are the exact ones you want tho. At this price range that is probably the most important aspect of the guitar.


It's not MAYBE made in Mexico, it IS made in Mexico.

Most guitars need a set up, as it's largely subjective, even with fret buzz.

The pickups that come with it are what come with it, I doubt stores will remove some stock pickups and put some Lace Golds in it for free.

The most important part? It's the easiest part to change. The wood, setup, comfort of the guitar is the most important part, not the part that is easily and cheaply changed.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#10
Fender started making guitars in china a couple years ago.

Where besides the reviews does it state Mexico?

I can't find that.
#11
Quote by gregs1020
Fender started making guitars in china a couple years ago.

Where besides the reviews does it state Mexico?

I can't find that.


This is a Standard, not a Modern Player, which IIRC are the only electric Fenders made in China.
#12
Yeah well knowing fender.


Either way I would personally look at some other options before this.
#13
Great guitar. I have an LP and this thing butts heads with it. I did however upgrade my pickups. Buy a used model.
#14
Quote by Mephaphil
It's not MAYBE made in Mexico, it IS made in Mexico.

Most guitars need a set up, as it's largely subjective, even with fret buzz.

The pickups that come with it are what come with it, I doubt stores will remove some stock pickups and put some Lace Golds in it for free.

The most important part? It's the easiest part to change. The wood, setup, comfort of the guitar is the most important part, not the part that is easily and cheaply changed.


+1. (Lace golds are awesome pickups though)
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#15
Also, have you considered buying a guitar other than a Strat? You can find great deals on better instruments if you're willing to look.
#16
Quote by dragnet99
I guess what I'm trying to figure out from those with more experience is whether or not this justifies a purchase. I'd really like to step up to a Strat, but given a price difference of only $200 or so, is it really different enough from a Squier to be worth it at this price?

I'm a beginner who's finally verging on "solid intermediate" so I'd like to get a guitar to reflect that, and one that I can plan on playing for a few years to come without worrying about having to upgrade in the immediate future.

When you look at low price range guitars, $200 makes much more difference than in high end guitars. $100 guitars may be complete crap but for $300 you'll get a decent guitar. And add another $200 to that and you'll get even better guitar. But I think the difference between a $200 and $400 guitar is bigger than the difference between $400 and $600 guitar.

And lol, in Europe that same guitar costs €500. You are getting much better stuff for much cheaper.
Quote by AlanHB
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#17
And American Fender will have better hardware, pickups/electronics, and(possibly) better fretwork. And I believe that the US Fenders use 3-piece bodies, while the Mexican Fenders use 5 or more(or so I hear).

But I wouldn't touch a Chinese Fender, Squier or otherwise. Some people swear by the CV and VM Squiers, and they are really good for what they are, but I feel like a MIM strat would be better than one of those in the long run, based on my experience with Squiers and their soft fret material.
#18
Quote by W4RP1G
And American Fender will have better hardware, pickups/electronics, and(possibly) better fretwork. And I believe that the US Fenders use 3-piece bodies, while the Mexican Fenders use 5 or more(or so I hear).

But I wouldn't touch a Chinese Fender, Squier or otherwise. Some people swear by the CV and VM Squiers, and they are really good for what they are, but I feel like a MIM strat would be better than one of those in the long run, based on my experience with Squiers and their soft fret material.


This x1000.

Spend the extra money and get the Standard MIM strat. If you want something a bit nicer but isn't the price of the American series, get one of the Classic series strats.
They also have the Deluxe Player's strat and the Blacktop strats if you want something a little more modern with slightly upgraded electronics.

Also, the last Classic Player's start I played (actually the last few Classic Players Strat I played) all had Made in Mexico on the back. I've never even seen a real Fender with Chinese markings on it (maybe that's just a new thing within the last year or so, I don't know)

Edit: The only starts I could find that are "Crafted in China" are the Modern Player's strats that came out last year. From everything I've read, they seem to be really bad. Most of the forums threads I've seen ended up with the owner returning it and getting a refund.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
Last edited by stonyman65 at Mar 15, 2013,
#19
There's a lot of subjectivity in all of this.

You don't say what model Squier you have. If it's a Bullet, then the MIM Strat will be a significant step up. If it's an Affinity or a high-end Squier, then maybe not so much.

The MIM Standards and most Squiers are extremely similar (21 fret necks, 6 point trems, cheap tuners, etc). Squier tuners, saddles, and pickups tend to be worse then those on MIMs. Also, it'll take more work to get the initial setup right (but probably cost you the same). Most Squiers have better fretwork than many MIMs. MIA Standard Strats have 22 fret necks, 2 point trems, and better hardware, but the MIA Deluxes have even better hardware and pups.

Lots of people will want to upgrade the pups in all these models. I'm leaving my MIA Strat stock with it's SSS pups, but I modded my Affinity with humbuckers, locking tuners, MIA Deluxe electronics, and now I prefer it over my MIA Strat. I will need to upgrade the saddles on of these days, though, as they're starting to wear.

What model Squier do you have, and what don't you like about it?
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#20
Quote by jetwash69
There's a lot of subjectivity in all of this.

You don't say what model Squier you have. If it's a Bullet, then the MIM Strat will be a significant step up. If it's an Affinity or a high-end Squier, then maybe not so much.

The MIM Standards and most Squiers are extremely similar (21 fret necks, 6 point trems, cheap tuners, etc). Squier tuners, saddles, and pickups tend to be worse then those on MIMs. Also, it'll take more work to get the initial setup right (but probably cost you the same). Most Squiers have better fretwork than many MIMs. MIA Standard Strats have 22 fret necks, 2 point trems, and better hardware, but the MIA Deluxes have even better hardware and pups.

Lots of people will want to upgrade the pups in all these models. I'm leaving my MIA Strat stock with it's SSS pups, but I modded my Affinity with humbuckers, locking tuners, MIA Deluxe electronics, and now I prefer it over my MIA Strat. I will need to upgrade the saddles on of these days, though, as they're starting to wear.

What model Squier do you have, and what don't you like about it?


I'm calling bullshit on that. I've owned a Squier, an MIM and now an Ameircan and there is a pretty big difference between them. The Squier was by far the worst and didn't even last a year. The MIM was pretty good but I ended up getting rid of it when I was able to afford an MIA standard back in 2005. The American was by far the best and is still going strong 8 years later.

I will say though that lots of the more recent MIM strats have been really good within the last few years. I'd even say they give the MIA models a run for their money in some aspects. I wouldn't hesitate one but to get one, especially the Classic Series.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#21
Quote by stonyman65
I'm calling bullshit on that. I've owned a Squier, an MIM and now an Ameircan and there is a pretty big difference between them. The Squier was by far the worst and didn't even last a year. The MIM was pretty good but I ended up getting rid of it when I was able to afford an MIA standard back in 2005. The American was by far the best and is still going strong 8 years later.

I will say though that lots of the more recent MIM strats have been really good within the last few years. I'd even say they give the MIA models a run for their money in some aspects. I wouldn't hesitate one but to get one, especially the Classic Series.




My first electric was an MIA Standard back in '06. Back then I couldn't find a MIM without really sharp frets. After playing it a couple of months I had to take a long trip to a place you wouldn't want to take anything nice, so I bought the Affinity (late '06, early '07--can't remember exact date). The setup out of the box was horrid. It had dead frets. But the neck and fret finishing was better than any MIM Strat I'd seen to date at the time. After a couple of adjustments, the Squier was playable, but when I returned from the trip I got pro setups by a luthier on both guitars. He had to shim the neck on the Squier, but once he did that both guitars were equally playable. The Squier still was less desirable because the tuners, pups, and output jack sucked.

After a couple of years, the Squier suddenly wouldn't stay in tune. I found that 2 of the tuner housings had sheared. I replaced them with $60 Fender/Schaller locking tuners, and they made the guitar even more playable than the MIA. Then I got an SD Jazz for the neck and pulled a Duncan Design humbucker off another guitar for the bridge. I re-did the electronics with Fender components made for MIA Deluxes and I upgraded the output jack with a $6 DiMarzio jack (it holds the plug better than the MIA jack).

Does the MIA sound nicer unplugged? Yeah. Does it have more frets and a better trem? Yeah. Does it sound better plugged in with the music I play? Nope, the Squier is my first choice for stage and recording over that MIA, and the 4 other guitars in my collection (including 2 MIJs).

So yeah, the Squiers have some issues that might need to be worked out. But guess what? The MIMs would have had the many of the same issues (sub-optimal tuners, pups, electronics, trem, and 21 frets), but the '06 models had sharp frets on top of that.

I do agree that MIMs have improved over the years, but so have most of the Squiers. I'll also add that the Blacktops (one of the only 22 fret MIMs) are probably better guitars than the MIA Specials (and the old Highway 1s). Incidentally the MIA Specials use basically the same trem and tuners as the MIMs.

The Bullets probably aren't worth upgrading, but other models may be, depending on what the TS wants to do with a guitar.
Quote by shiggityswah

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Last edited by jetwash69 at Mar 15, 2013,
#23
You shouldn't pay $400 for a MIM strat unless you have to buy it new. You can find them all day, every day on craigslist and ebay for $200-300.

I'm afraid I'll have to stick up for the MIC guitars a bit. I have a MIC Modern Player Jag, and it's really cool. Nice p90s for the thick tone I like, and the tuners feel good. Sure, maybe MIC trem systems are crap, but mine has a TOM style bridge. Plus, I mean, I paid less for mine than a lot of people would on a Squier.

I'm not going to say a MIA strat is not better than MIC. It is. But what I hear from people who own both (what I hear online, anyway) is that the quality of MIM varies quite a bit, and on average seems to be about equal with the Modern Player and Classic Vibe guitars. Don't get me wrong, the budget line squiers are junk. But a lot of people on this forum will buy MIC guitars from other companies, so whatever, man.
#24
Quote by gregs1020
what are the two MIJs?



Thought you've heard it a million times, Greg...

Fender '65 Mustang (Re-issue)
Ibanez RG770DX (Re-issue)

No complaints about either of those guitars, other than the easily chipped paint on the RG. I've recorded and done shows with both of them, but I still prefer the modded Squier.
Quote by shiggityswah

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Last edited by jetwash69 at Mar 15, 2013,
#25
Look at the guitar you want closely. What kind of bridge? Pickups? Check the back of the neck to see if it's all one piece, or multiple pieces glued. What kind of wood? Those type of things determine the price.
#26
1. its made in mexico their usually about 500
2. its march, new model started january so their their trying to sell off all of last years models
#27
Quote by randywolf244
[stuff]


How'd the gig go with your new MFX, or is it still going and you're just on break?
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
#28
I have a couple of Strats, also started from a Squier and also bought a Mexican Fender as my second guitar. In my opinion if you have $1000 to spend then you should go for an American series strat, it isn't a particularely big jump from Squier to Mexican Fender, and sometimes a good Squier will beat a bad or even average Mexican Fender.

Though you will of course get higher quality components with a MIM Fender than a Squier, if you're going to get an upgrade you should take it to the next step, get an American one. Preferably even go to a guitar shop and try a whole bunch of them (if that is possible).

Guitars are very individual things, each single one is slightly different so just knowing that "it's an American made Fender" doesn't necessarily mean it will be the right guitar for you, In my eyes you need to hold it in your hands and say "yes! this is my new guitar"

It's like picking your new girlfriend, you want to atleast have a chat, maybe take her on a date before you settle down!
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Last edited by Bigbazz at Mar 16, 2013,
#29
My personal experience going from a quality MIM to a quality MIA, what you get for that extra $600:

~Higher quality hardware. The tuners are nicer and hold tuning better. The bridge is also much easier to adjust, and holds tuning much better, even if you lock it down as a hardtail like I do.
~Higher quality wood. The neck on the MIM was nice, no doubt about it. I liked that guitar for a reason. But the neck on the MIA is a finely crafted tool. Even though they're both the same profile, from the grain, to the thickness and feel of the lacquer, and everything else it's a stark contrast.
~Higher quality electronics. Thicker, clearer wire, higher endurance pots, the electronics of MIAs are much nicer than MIMs. Or so I've been told - I'm not very good at soldering, but my brother's soldered things that have gone to the International Space Station, so I like to think he is, and according to him, the soldering on MIAs is much better, as are the components.
~22nd fret. This seems like something irrelevant. Especially if you, like me, have giant hands, so don't use those much because your fingers don't fit very well. But for some people it's a very important thing - tons of people don't even want something without 24, let alone 22 - and it's come in handy even for me and my big fat fingers.
~Clearer pickups. This was probably the starkest contrast to my ears. The MIM pickups weren't bad pickups, but comparing the two is like turning off a really ugly EQ on a track. The MIA pickups sound so much clearer I thought I was imagining it to make myself feel better about the purchase, so ran and grabbed the MIM for comparison. I wasn't imagining it, they're a world better.
~Bridge tone control. I've heard this has been done on newer MIMs, but American Standards are wired so the middle tone control instead controls the middle and bridge pickup. I hated the ice picky bridge pickup of my MIM, but with the tone somewhere between 6-8 depending on the tone I want, I love it on my MIA. Bridge tone controls on a strat are a godsend.
~It feels nicer. This has nothing to do with the guitar and everything to do with the mind. They say mind over matter, and it's true. the MIAs just feel and look nicer, even if they shouldn't. It's your brain going "This is the higher end model, so it has to be nicer, so I'm going to act like it is", but it does make you feel better, and you play as good as you feel.

I'm not trying to knock MIMs, they're nice guitars. I liked mine, and if money were no object, I'd keep it even though I'll probably never touch it again except as a backup or project. And there are definitely some awful MIAs and some amazing MIMs. I've played both, they exist. But if you can afford to and you can play it first to make sure it's one of the good ones, spring for an American strat. You won't be disappointed.

I do still wish Fender would finally start using stainless fretwire on their American guitars though...
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#30
I love my MIM strat, it's seriously the most comfortable guitar I've ever played, bar none.

That being said, on topic, I'm not sure if this has been mentioned, but Fender is having a spring sale on strats, which is probably why the price is so low. Even MIM strats aren't usually 400$.
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#31
Quote by necrosis1193

I do still wish Fender would finally start using stainless fretwire on their American guitars though...


We can only dream

The only complaint that I have with my MIA is that after 8 or so years of playing it, the fret wire is pretty much dead to the point where I need a total re-fret pretty soon.

In contrast, on my used Ibanez from the mid 90's, the fret wire is almost brand new and that guitar is 15+ years old.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#32
Quote by stonyman65
I'm calling bullshit on that. I've owned a Squier, an MIM and now an Ameircan and there is a pretty big difference between them. The Squier was by far the worst and didn't even last a year. The MIM was pretty good but I ended up getting rid of it when I was able to afford an MIA standard back in 2005. The American was by far the best and is still going strong 8 years later.

I will say though that lots of the more recent MIM strats have been really good within the last few years. I'd even say they give the MIA models a run for their money in some aspects. I wouldn't hesitate one but to get one, especially the Classic Series.


i think the word subjectivity has been thrown around alot on here and whoever is using it is totally right.
ive owned 4 mexicans, 1 american and 1 squire.

my opinion:

the squire was junk.

the american was awesome, (american standard)

the mexicans were just as good as the american for alot less money

the 90s mexican floyd rose strat IS the best guitar i have ever owned BY FAR.

not everyone will agree with me but not everyone plays the way i do or likes the same things i do. thats why this is such a subjective topic because people are into different things. for example i would rather buy a mexican for 500, put 300 in new pups and tuning heads, and get exactly the sound i want instead of spending 1200 for an american, that i just blew all my money on so i have to keep as is
#33
Depends what you have. I used to have an affinity squier that was a total beast, great guitar. Played great, just had junk hardware and electronics. I used to have an MIM jimmie vaughan strat. Easily one of the best strats I've ever played, great guitars. The squire was like 150 I think, the jimmie vaughan was 600. I wouldn't say the JV was 450 dollars better than the squier though.

Btw, the jimmie vaughans were basically MIM american strats. They had american vintage style tuners and classic style american trems with full blocks and the nice bent steel saddles. The pickups were texas specials wound in mexico, great pups.

I played an MIC fender strat today (modern player or whatever?) and it was junk. Barely playable. The D string rattled like crazy and I couldn't see any reason why.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#34
Quote by Kevin Saale

I played an MIC fender strat today (modern player or whatever?) and it was junk. Barely playable. The D string rattled like crazy and I couldn't see any reason why.


That's exactly what I've been hearing too.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#35
Quote by Kevin Saale
Depends what you have. I used to have an affinity squier that was a total beast, great guitar. Played great, just had junk hardware and electronics. I used to have an MIM jimmie vaughan strat. Easily one of the best strats I've ever played, great guitars. The squire was like 150 I think, the jimmie vaughan was 600. I wouldn't say the JV was 450 dollars better than the squier though.

Btw, the jimmie vaughans were basically MIM american strats. They had american vintage style tuners and classic style american trems with full blocks and the nice bent steel saddles. The pickups were texas specials wound in mexico, great pups.

I played an MIC fender strat today (modern player or whatever?) and it was junk. Barely playable. The D string rattled like crazy and I couldn't see any reason why.

It's kind of stupid to say that something is "$xxx better" than something. You can't measure it that way. You just need to pay for the quality.

If I had $2000 to spend on a guitar, I would buy the guitar that feels and sounds the best to me. I wouldn't look at the price. If I could get a guitar for $500 that felt and sounded almost like what I'm looking for and then there was a $2000 guitar that felt and sounded just the way I liked, I would buy the $2000 guitar because after that I wouldn't need to buy any other guitars. I would be completely satisfied with it. It wouldn't be "$1500 better" than the $500 guitar but it would be the best guitar for me so I would buy it. I wouldn't be completely satisfied with the $500 guitar.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#36
Good thing I didn't say that, otherwise I'd be stupid.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#37
Quote by MaggaraMarine
It's kind of stupid to say that something is "$xxx better" than something. You can't measure it that way. You just need to pay for the quality.

If I had $2000 to spend on a guitar, I would buy the guitar that feels and sounds the best to me. I wouldn't look at the price. If I could get a guitar for $500 that felt and sounded almost like what I'm looking for and then there was a $2000 guitar that felt and sounded just the way I liked, I would buy the $2000 guitar because after that I wouldn't need to buy any other guitars. I would be completely satisfied with it. It wouldn't be "$1500 better" than the $500 guitar but it would be the best guitar for me so I would buy it. I wouldn't be completely satisfied with the $500 guitar.


It's also "kind of stupid" to totally disregard the cost. Especially since Fender might not even make a guitar that's exactly what you want (you should know about that, based on your sig). That's why there's a robust parts aftermarket for pups, hardware, and cosmetic components. That's also why Fender has subsidiaries like Fender Custom Shop, Squier, Gretsch, Jackson Guitars, Guild, and Charvel, to name a few. And why other companies provide alternatives as well.

I wasn't "completely" satisfied with any of my guitars. But I'm not modding my MIA Strat or my MIJ Ibanez Prestige (or any guitar that cost more than $500) because the modifications will reduce the resale value (sometimes by more than what the new parts cost). I don't ever want to sell any of my guitars, but if I'm forced to, then I don't want to lose money twice on it.

I got my sub-$500 guitars equipped exactly like I want them--which is a big reason why I play them a lot more.

There are several other things to consider when buying the guitar that "felt and sounded just the way [you] liked".
- Guitar setup is very subjective. It's also one of the most critical elements to how the guitar "feels." Maybe you have enough experience to see through set-up factors, but the average UGer looking for knowledge in these forums may not. That's a great way to miss out on an outstanding guitar because it's so easy to change the setup or have a pro (probably not the guy in the store) do it for you.
- We're talking Strats here mainly. Most Strats come strung with 9s. I know of only a handful of UGers who use 9s on their Strats. I don't know anyone IRL who uses them; 10s are much more popular and I know a few guys who even use 11s and 12s. Yes, I know a few famous guitarists use 9s and even 8s, but I don't know them in real life. The 9s will feel and sound different than 10s (or other gauges). Few shops will let you restring a display model. Also if you're looking at used guitars, lots of them have strings that should have been changed years ago (some "new" display models, too) and you could pass up a great guitar because it will feel like crap due to needing $4 strings that you'd be getting right away anyway.

Finally, if you can be satisfied with only 1 guitar (especially one with a Floyd Rose) then you've limited yourself. While it's physically possible to do multiple tunings with a Floyd, it's not practical, even compared to a regular Strat bridge. Also, even if you split humbuckers, they still don't sound just like a single coil. And an HH can't get the tones you could get out of an SSS due to pickup placement (and vice versa).

Incidentally, I paid less Dollars for my Ibanez Prestige (new) than you paid Euros for your So-Cal.
Quote by shiggityswah

Welcome to UG. Everyone here will piss you off at some point, it's just what we do.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Mar 17, 2013,
#38
To point out the difference of each guitar being individual. I own a 2001 Squier Strat, upgraded the pickups (but not the other electronics), replaced the nut and string trees with graphtech and the tuners with Sperzels since i've had it.

1. It has the lowest action of all my guitars, it always has had low action, no fret
buzz.

2. The frets are visibly worn but after 12 years of use each note still rings clear and it still does not need a refret. It also came with very small frets as standard and despite that they have lasted well.

3. None of electronics have ever needed to be replaced, though I did have to replace the pickup switch on my Ibanez Jem worth 20x the value, it happens.

4. It held tuning well, though it had a sticky cheap plastic nut so was annoying when it needed to be tuned, with a new £5 worth of nut installed it has no issues, I bought the sperzels but realised after installing the nut that they werent needed, obviously I installed them anyway.

5. It sounds and plays great, it's lightweight but resonates well and with the upgraded pickups its sounds easily as good (in its own way) as my other guitars, fairly bright sounding with a lot of clarity but not harsh.

Really good Squiers do exist, and my guitar has lasted me a long time with a lot of hard playing. Speaking of 90s Mexican Floyd rose Strats, my first Mexican Fender was a 1999 Floyd Rose Fat Strat.


The 1999 Mexican Fender Floyd Rose Fat Strat, I bought new in 2002.


1. Tuning stability isn't the best because if the neck takes a knock it seems to move slightly and it affects the tunning, this can be done by just pulling firmly on the neck you feel it creak, none of my other guitars do this. The tuners themselves feel of much higher quality than those that came with the Squier.

2. I had to put a thin shim of cardboard underneath the locking nut because the G string was buzzing on the first fret. The locking nut is also not perfectly fitted to the neck and there is around 1m of underhang where the nut does not reach the full width of the neck in the nut slot, though the string spread is fine.

3. I did a good job of it and the clearance at the first fret is now perfect, but the action on the guitar is generally fairly high, the highest of all my guitars atleast and it isn't something I can fix through setup. It isn't a big deal though and the guitar plays great.

4. Electronics have been flawless, I replaced all the pickups. The pickup switch and controls feel like much nicer in quality than those on the Squier, but in practice they both work the same.

5. Frets, much bigger than on the Squier and have lasted well, no complaints here.


All in all what I'm saying is, every guitar is individual. By all accounts my Squier is a more well built guitar than my Mexican Fender is, and while the components are generally not as high quality on the Squier they still do the job just as well. My Mexican Fender Strat is still a great guitar despite those little flaws, it sounds fantastic and it plays good, but it isn't a better guitar than my much lower value Squier.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
Last edited by Bigbazz at Mar 17, 2013,
#39
Quote by Bigbazz
1. Tuning stability isn't the best because if the neck takes a knock it seems to move slightly and it affects the tunning, this can be done by just pulling firmly on the neck you feel it creak, none of my other guitars do this. The tuners themselves feel of much higher quality than those that came with the Squier.

Sounds like you might have a fixable issue. This isn't a normal thing, not even in cheap guitars. Make sure your neck screws are pretty tight, and remove that cardboard shim from beneath the locking nut. If you need a shim, use something stronger than cardboard, like some aluminum from a soda/beer can.
#40
Quote by W4RP1G
Sounds like you might have a fixable issue. This isn't a normal thing, not even in cheap guitars. Make sure your neck screws are pretty tight, and remove that cardboard shim from beneath the locking nut. If you need a shim, use something stronger than cardboard, like some aluminum from a soda/beer can.


The neck might need a shim, too, so you can get the action lower without buzzing. A luthier or a highly qualified tech can do this easily. You might even be able to do it yourself, but for most of us, that's a job better left to the pros.
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