fullstop
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2013
188 IQ
#1
Oh dear.

I just want to learn to play guitar too, it's way better than playing piano (i love piano but i like a little bit more guitar due to the sound it makes.

I just want to know how to read:
  • Learn to read chords drawings
  • Learn to read tab

I just tried to myself but the most I did was a "C" chord with weird sound. So any little tips to improve that? Thanks to everyone!
Junior#1
Is SouTaicho Yamamoto-san
Join date: Oct 2007
238 IQ
#2
Learning to read and understand chord diagrams and tabs won't help you play guitar unless you practice playing guitar. Get a teacher and get to work.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
Bikewer
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
65 IQ
#4
Many thousands of people have learned to play without the benefit of formal instruction. The advantage of instruction is that you will be steered away from bad habits and pitfalls early on, instead of clumsily working your way through them as most self-taught folks do. (myself included)
However... There are now so many fine resources available for the self-taught... Compared to when I started playing back in the 70s.
I was fortunate in having many playing friends from whom I could cadge tips and ask odd questions.
However, I learned the most from instruction books and magazines like Guitar Player. In fact, I pretty rapidly found that I was learning things my folk-music friends didn't know....

Now, with instruction books coming with accompanying DVDs, and online videos, and computer programs and apps, and all that.... The self-learner can do quite well.

Also, at times there is just a clash of personality with potential teachers, and often not that many available teachers to choose from.
antisun
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
1,263 IQ
#5
Try googling justin guitar for some great advice on some general things, especially chords. Also, START ALTERNATE PICKING! When i first started playing guitar, i avoided it and figured i'd pick it up later as i got better with the instrument itself, big mistake, trying to alternate pick something you only know how to downpick is like having to re-learn the entire guitar. Practice major and minor scales, pentatonic as well. They are a great way to get a basic grip on the relationships between the strings, frets, and the notes that are on them.
Junior#1
Is SouTaicho Yamamoto-san
Join date: Oct 2007
238 IQ
#6
Quote by antisun
Try googling justin guitar for some great advice on some general things

Or just go to www.justinguitar.com
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
fullstop
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2013
188 IQ
#8
Every 2 weeks, on Sat, will go to a guitar class in my high school. There are guitar pro's. I have a guitar so the gear isn't a problem. Will search for books too, a friend have one and he's learning pretty fast.

Thank to you all guys you're awesome.
robertwilliam9
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
324 IQ
#9
Here's a quick "starter kit" that I keep on my blog: http://www.guitarchalk.com/2013/03/just-picked-up-guitar-where-do-i-start.html

It's all the stuff that helped me out when I first started. Hope it helps.
Paul Reed Smith CE-24 2005 and Santana SE with Seymour Duncan pickups.
Line 6 Amplifiers
Boss Effects and Steve Vai's Wah Pedal
Dunlop Picks and Elixir Strings .48


WEBSITE
guitarchalk.com
Guitarra_acores
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2011
200 IQ
#10
Quote by Bikewer
Many thousands of people have learned to play without the benefit of formal instruction. The advantage of instruction is that you will be steered away from bad habits and pitfalls early on, instead of clumsily working your way through them as most self-taught folks do. (myself included)
However... There are now so many fine resources available for the self-taught... Compared to when I started playing back in the 70s.
I was fortunate in having many playing friends from whom I could cadge tips and ask odd questions.
However, I learned the most from instruction books and magazines like Guitar Player. In fact, I pretty rapidly found that I was learning things my folk-music friends didn't know....

Now, with instruction books coming with accompanying DVDs, and online videos, and computer programs and apps, and all that.... The self-learner can do quite well.

Also, at times there is just a clash of personality with potential teachers, and often not that many available teachers to choose from.


3 years self taught here.
I think like almost anything in life being self-taught has both pros and cons.

Pros:
-Can give you a deeper understanding of what you are doing and why you are doing things that way. It's easier to be original and innovative if you don't have someone guiding you
Cons:
-99,9% chance you will develop bad habits and you will probably take more time to become a good player from a technical point of view

Being self-taught has made me a better musician because it made me think of the "why's" of doing something a certain way. You can do this with a teacher too, but I just think people are more prone to accepting information without wanting a deeper understanding when someone tells them how to do something. On the other hand looking back I made some easy to spot mistakes that set me back (posture/being relaxed and picking), so I could be a
better player if I had a teacher. It doesn't mean I won't reach my full potential being self-taught, it just means it will take longer.

I don't regret being self-taught at all but I think a teacher is a better option for 90% of the people out there... I just think self-taught suits me better

So, in short, I just wrote all this to advise OP to get a teacher