#1
I just got my first client for a pickup install. Simple enough, swap out three single coils. No big deal. But I've run into a slight problem: My client gave me 250k pots which is conviniently what the Seymour Duncan wiring diagram I got says he needs but the actual screw part of the pot is too wide to fit through the pickguard so I'm left at kind of a stand still.

Also, he gave me a 500k volume pot. The SD diagram says I need a 250k. Is he going to have any problems if I throw the 500k in?

Thanks, Pit!
#2
The pots will just influence the sound a tad differently, other than that they'll be fine regardless of the value.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#4
You serious? If you can't overcome an tiny little problem like this, then you shouldn't be working on anyone's guitar, or at least not charging money while you learn on their instrument.
#5
Really, this is the ONE hang up I've had. I've already got all of the soldering and wiring done and I kind of overlooked putting the whole shebang back in one piece. I had a theory about just maybe filing the holes so the pot would fit but if I can save myself the hassle by doing something else then I will.
#6
I believe most pots require a 3/8" hole. Are the pots he gave you bigger than 3/8"?

If you enlarge the hole beyond 3/8", other pots might fit a bit too sloppy in there, if he does decide to change them to CTS or Alpha brand pots.

If the current hole is smaller than 3/8", then I would enlarge it with a 3/8" drill bit.
#7
Dude, I don't mean to sound like a dick here but if you don't know the difference between pot values, and you don't know how to fit the aftermarket parts to the pickguard, than you shouldn't be doing the work to begin with. And you definitely shouldn't be charging for said work when you can't even accomplish a basic wiring swap.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
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#8
Quote by W4RP1G
I believe most pots require a 3/8" hole. Are the pots he gave you bigger than 3/8"?

If you enlarge the hole beyond 3/8", other pots might fit a bit too sloppy in there, if he does decide to change them to CTS or Alpha brand pots.

If the current hole is smaller than 3/8", then I would enlarge it with a 3/8" drill bit.


From what he told me he got a Fender with actives in it and wanted to swap them out for passives so he pulled the pups off of an old Squier he had and wanted to swap out the pots too. So he gave me two Fender replacement tone pots and a 500k volume pot from a brand I can't remember. The pickguard he he kind of just handed me. It had all 500k pots and they all fit nicely. But the pots he wants are all a little too big. So I guess I'm going to have to drill a hole. Thanks a bunch, man!
#9
Quote by Wrst_Plyr_Evr
From what he told me he got a Fender with actives in it and wanted to swap them out for passives so he pulled the pups off of an old Squier he had and wanted to swap out the pots too. So he gave me two Fender replacement tone pots and a 500k volume pot from a brand I can't remember. The pickguard he he kind of just handed me. It had all 500k pots and they all fit nicely. But the pots he wants are all a little too big. So I guess I'm going to have to drill a hole. Thanks a bunch, man!

It had actives in it, but it had 500k pots?
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#10
Quote by Wrst_Plyr_Evr
Really, this is the ONE hang up I've had. I've already got all of the soldering and wiring done and I kind of overlooked putting the whole shebang back in one piece. I had a theory about just maybe filing the holes so the pot would fit but if I can save myself the hassle by doing something else then I will.


If you're looking to work with clients now and in the future and maintain a good relationship (which is good for return business), it's best practice not to decide for yourself what your next move will be. You can if it's your guitar, not if it's someone elses and you're doing paid work.

Choices are:

1. either ream out the hole to fit the pots he gave you
2. buy and install the correct value 250k pots with the same shaft diameter as the originals which won't require modifying the guitar (but will cost them a bit more for the new pots)
3. leave the 500k ones in and explain there may be a slight change in overall tone

You call the client, tell him the pot shafts on the pots he gave you will not fit through the pot holes and then give him the options on how you should proceed. Then let them decide how you should proceed.

Because if it was me, I'm not letting you modify my scratch plate. If I gave you oversize pots, well that's on me. I'd want the correct value pots installed with no hole oversizing, not the 500k ones back in if that's not whats meant to be there. And I want my pots back. But how would you know that, if you didn't ask?

comprende?
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Last edited by Phoenix V at Mar 16, 2013,
#11
Quote by Viban
It had actives in it, but it had 500k pots?

*WUT tree that I'm stealing*


Yea, it didn't really make sense to me either.

Quote by Phoenix V
If you're looking to work with clients now and in the future and maintain a good relationship (which is good for return business), it's best practice not to decide for yourself what your next move will be. You can if it's your guitar, not if it's someone elses and you're doing paid work.

Choices are:

1. either ream out the hole to fit the pots he gave you
2. buy and install the correct value 250k pots with the same shaft diameter as the originals which won't require modifying the guitar (but will cost them a bit more for the new pots)
3. leave the 500k ones in and explain there may be a slight change in overall tone

You call the client, tell him the pot shafts on the pots he gave you will not fit through the pot holes and then give him the options on how you should proceed. Then let them decide how you should proceed.

Because if it was me, I'm not letting you modify my scratch plate. If I gave you oversize pots, well that's on me. I'd want the correct value pots installed with no hole oversizing, not the 500k ones back in if that's not whats meant to be there. And I want my pots back. But how would you know that, if you didn't ask?

comprende?


Que mucho, señor.

My plan of attack was to ask UG since there's A LOT of people that know A LOT more than I do before I went to my real job and see if I'd actually have to do anything. I kind of made the mistake of working a little too close to my shift when I had my "Oh shit" moment. Regardless, I'm calling him tomorrow to tell him what happened and see what he wants to do.
#12
If the guitar came with active pickups then it will have had everything drilled for metric parts; smaller shafts. Evidently the owner has handed you imperial parts. Should just be a simple case of reaming or re-drilling the pot holes.

The value thing isn't so weird. The whole thing about particular pickups 'needing' particular values just comes from when electric guitars were first being made and Fender mostly had 250k pots and Gibson mostly had 300k and 500k pots; these weren't values the companies chose to match their pcikups, they were just the pots that each company had the most of to hand (hence why when you look at old Gibsons in particular there is no common configuration; they used to have dual 300ks, a 300k and 500k, a 500k and 300k, linear taper, log taper, odd cap values, etc).

That said, as others have outlined, you shouldn't be taking on jobs even as basic as this if you don't know the difference between using a 500k pot and a 250k pot. You also shouldn't be taking on this kind of work if you can't at first glance recognise imperial and metric parts. Half the tech jobs I get paid to do come from fixing what some amateur has done. It's great for my bank balance if people try fixing up peoples' guitars without knowing what they're doing, but it's not so great for the owner of the guitar.

This is a simple job and a very simple fix. Get this done then step away from this sort of thing for a while. Hack up your own guitars, practise on your own time with your own money on your own equipment and get all this basic stuff down pat before you take on a job for somebody else. Buy a whole bunch of different parts—as many different brands/sizes of the same thing as you can afford—and familiarise yourself with all of them. You don't need to be able to field-strip a guitar blindfolded but you do need to be able to recognise a 4mm ABR bridge from a 6mm Nashville one, a CTS pot from an Alpha and a mylar cap from a ceramic. You should know what parts fit will a standard Squier Strat and which parts fit a standard Fender Strat; same for a Gibson Standard and a MIK/MIC/MII Gibson copy.
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