#1
Ok, i am new into the theory world.
A complete online learner. I play metallica, almost all of them.

So i have started retracing the correct path of music theory. Read couple of basic books and i am actually keen towards learning heavy / metallica metal with a classcial or more back-to-basics kinda TOUCH to it. I am just diverting to wards the most BASIC metal, just simple and resonating.

So help me with some theory links which will help me continue my online course.
Help me with the neo classcial theory and bands. This what ive recently read, let me know if am going right.
I am also searching for a good alternate tuning, good in sense for the above requirements of classical touch to metal. Dont know if i am enough clear.

Thanks for sharing your views.
Last edited by siddiq4321 at Mar 17, 2013,
#3
Neo /nova /novus are all words from which the English "new" is derived. "Neo" is Greek, "novus" is Latin.

So then, "neo-classical" = "new classical".

As far as "neo-classical heavy metal" is concerned. I expect that it is a bullshit term coined to explain the existence of bands that are as pretentious as "Yes", and "Emerson, Lake, and Palmer", but aren't as talented. But, which use a whole lot more distortion, along with 7 and 8 string guitars, in support of their attempts to annoy everyone within a half mile radius.

But, what the heck do I know.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 17, 2013,
#6
Breifly, i am not sure of my kind of genre. So can it be right to say one can be a game changer with a little more mods on the neo and rise a new style?
#8
Quote by Captaincranky
Neo /nova /novus are all words from which the English "new" is derived. "Neo" is Greek, "novus" is Latin.

So then, "neo-classical" = "new classical".

As far as "neo-classical heavy metal" is concerned. I expect that it is a bullshit term coined to explain the existence of bands that are as pretentious as "Yes", and "Emerson, Lake, and Palmer", but aren't as talented. But, which use a whole lot more distortion, along with 7 and 8 string guitars, in support of their attempts to annoy everyone within a half mile radius.

But, what the heck do I know.

So what sould be my genre of music, if i like very basic -simple metal like metallica and want to explore more with their songs and write my own?
Thanks!
#9
Quote by siddiq4321
So what sould be my genre of music, if i like very basic -simple metal like metallica and want to explore more with their songs and write my own?
Thanks!



Don't get caught up in genres. Make the music you want to make and let someone else worry about defining it.
#10
Well; the neoclassical movement in music started sometime in the late 1940s as a nostalgic rebellion to the unbridled emotionalism of late 19th-century classical pieces. It sought more of the old balance in compositions. The composer most popularly associated with the neoclassical movement is Igor Stravinsky. His opera The Rake's Progress is one of the best-known neoclassical pieces in existence.

Now, as for neoclassical as it applies to Heavy Metal, that is a different story. The term was coined when Yngwie Malmsteen burst onto the scene, playing at blistering speeds and employing diminished arpeggios not typically associated with Heavy Metal. In particular, his interpretations of the works of the violinist Niccolo Paganini led people to term Malmsteen's music "neoclassical" in that traditional elements of classical music were clearly present. As guitarists tried to emulate his style and technical ability (not an easy thing to do), the genre of "Neoclassical Metal" was born. But it doesn't have any relation to neoclassicalism in the traditional sense.

If you want to progress in Heavy Metal, my first suggestion would be to post in the Electric Guitar Forum. You'll get more results there. As for online learning, there are dozens of sites from which to choose. Just type "neoclassical metal guitar lessons" into your search engine and go from there. YouTube also has endless numbers of such instructional videos. Beyond that, get yourself a metronome and a book of scales and modes and get practicing.

Good Luck!
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Mar 20, 2013,
#11
Quote by FatalGear41
Well; the neoclassical movement in music started sometime in the late 1940s as a nostalgic rebellion to the unbridled emotionalism of late 19th-century classical pieces. It sought more of the old balance in compositions. The composer most popularly associated with the neoclassical movement is Igor Stravinsky. His opera The Rake's Progress is one of the best-known neoclassical pieces in existence.

Now, as for neoclassical as it applies to Heavy Metal, that is a different story. The term was coined when Yngwie Malmsteen burst onto the scene, playing at blistering speeds and employing diminished arpeggios not typically associated with Heavy Metal. In particular, his interpretations of the works of the violinist Niccolo Paganini led people to term Malmsteen's music "neoclassical" in that traditional elements of classical music were clearly present. As guitarists tried to emulate his style and technical ability (not an easy thing to do), the genre of "Neoclassical Metal" was born. But it doesn't have any relation to neoclassicalism in the traditional sense.

If you want to progress in Heavy Metal, my first suggestion would be to post in the Electric Guitar Forum. You'll get more results there. As for online learning, there are dozens of sites from which to choose. Just type "neoclassical metal guitar lessons" into your search engine and go from there. YouTube also has endless numbers of such instructional videos. Beyond that, get yourself a metronome and a book of scales and modes and get practicing.

Good Luck!

Helped! Thanks! App!
#12
Quote by derek8520
Don't get caught up in genres. Make the music you want to make and let someone else worry about defining it.

Sounds right though. Ill need a base isnt it. Otherwise a lifetime would be required. Thanks anyways