#1
So the way we know. The 2nd and 3rd, B and G strings have a odd 4 semitone /frets interval, made to make the whole notes appear or to avoid altered notes there and make some easy chord patters. Be free to correct me.
But as i have read, this also makes the scales pattern odd. So why hasent there been an alternate tuning to go both with chords and scales? Let me know if there is and comprovisong one.
My form is metal/neo classcial, let your answer be more keen towards them
Thanks!
Last edited by siddiq4321 at Mar 18, 2013,
#2
What. The 2nd and 3rd strings aren't B and E. The gap from a B to an E is a Fourth also. The gap from the G string to the B string is a Major Third.

You can tune in all Fourths, making it E A D G C f.

There are also a plethora of tunings out there. Open tunings are all the strings tuned into the notes of a chord. i.e. Open C = C G C G C e
Take a look at this: http://sethares.engr.wisc.edu/alternatetunings/alternatetunings.html for a more in depth look at different tunings.
#3
Quote by Soccerguy
What. The 2nd and 3rd strings aren't B and E. The gap from a B to an E is a Fourth also. The gap from the G string to the B string is a Major Third.

You can tune in all Fourths, making it E A D G C f.

There are also a plethora of tunings out there. Open tunings are all the strings tuned into the notes of a chord. i.e. Open C = C G C G C e
Take a look at this: http://sethares.engr.wisc.edu/alternatetunings/alternatetunings.html for a more in depth look at different tunings.

shits. Pls correct it to B and G, yes, i was saying it to be semitones (frets precisely). So what i know is there are 4 semitones between 2 nd and 3rd strings and 5 between 1st and 2nd. So retracing my question, what can be the possible tuning solution.
Also does your next answer for all fourths and open c, change the chords and scales a lot?

Thanks!
#4
Quote by siddiq4321
Also does your next answer for all fourths and open c, change the chords and scales a lot?
Yes. You would have to relearn chords and scales in any alternate tuning.

A few open tunings are chords anyway. So with those, you simply barre the guitar, kind of like a steel guitar. That works when your next chord in simply a scale shift of the chord the guitar is tuned to. If it isn't, you need to learn all new fingerings.

BTW, how do you expect that when you change string relationships in pitch to one another, that scale shape and chord shapes WOULDN'T CHANGE?

The only alternate tuning that doesn't change shapes on both chords and scales, would be a lower or higher STANDARD tuning
.
For example, "E standard", or "concert pitch", for Spanish guitar is: E, A, D, G, B, e.

Two frets, (or two "semitones"), down to "D standard", would be D, G, C F, A, d.

Your open E major chord would be now be a D major, but formed with the same shape.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 18, 2013,
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
Yes. You would have to relearn chords and scales in any alternate tuning.

A few open tunings are chords anyway. So with those, you simply barre the guitar, kind of like a steel guitar. That works when your next chord in simply a scale shift of the chord the guitar is tuned to. If it isn't, you need to learn all new fingerings.

BTW, how do you expect that when you change string relationships in pitch to one another, that scale shape and chord shapes WOULDN'T CHANGE?

The only alternate tuning that doesn't change shapes on both chords and scales, would be a lower or higher STANDARD tuning
.
For example, "E standard", or "concert pitch", for Spanish guitar is: E, A, D, G, B, e.

Two frets, (or two "semitones"), down to "D standard", would be D, G, C F, A, d.

Your open E major chord would be now be a D major, but formed with the same shape.

Got it!
Thanks!

Ps- there was "a lot" in there
#6
"Standard" tuning is just a convention... It tends to present a number of keys with easy-to-finger chord shapes and easy transitions.
Not so much for others.
Scale patterns fall out fairly easily.....
But there are dozens of different tuning possibilities.. You can be assured that no matter what weird tuning you might come up with, someone will have tried it previously.
As well, the fretboard is just arranged as a convention. There are many other possibilities.... One guitar manufacturer produced a guitar for a while with interchangeable fretboards set up for differently "tempered" tunings and intervals based on Asian scales and other stuff as well....

Most of us just struggle along trying to master everything in standard tuning. Some folks have a head for all that alternate stuff... We watched s CSN concert years ago where Stills seemed to use a different guitar (in a different tuning) for each song.....
#7
Quote by Bikewer
"Standard" tuning is just a convention... It tends to present a number of keys with easy-to-finger chord shapes and easy transitions.
Not so much for others.
Scale patterns fall out fairly easily.....
But there are dozens of different tuning possibilities.. You can be assured that no matter what weird tuning you might come up with, someone will have tried it previously.
As well, the fretboard is just arranged as a convention. There are many other possibilities.... One guitar manufacturer produced a guitar for a while with interchangeable fretboards set up for differently "tempered" tunings and intervals based on Asian scales and other stuff as well....

Most of us just struggle along trying to master everything in standard tuning. Some folks have a head for all that alternate stuff... We watched s CSN concert years ago where Stills seemed to use a different guitar (in a different tuning) for each song.....

Hmm. Helpfull.
I am more keen towards eadgfc BTW.
Ps- woill it cause any seriuos neck wraps with just a semitone more of tension on those two strings.?
Ps- so precisely, are you enchouraging me to try and stick to a perticular tuning?
Thanks
#8
I learned in "standard tuning". I Don't use tunings other than "drop D". (E-6 tuned to a D). So, whether you learn two languages at once, so to speak, or many, is up to the individual. It seems quite natural to a child growing up in a bilingual household to learn two languages simultaneously. Some of us barely can manage the one we've been exposed to since birth.

Steven Stills was pointed out above as an example of someone who constantly changes. Keep in mind he's also a rock legend.

You seem, (at least at the moment), to be struggling with the concepts of scales changing and chord formation. That's not a good, or even adequate preparation for learning multiple tunings. One thing that is required is a superb ear. You also need patience to learn the different scale or chord shapes required each time you change the tuning.

Listen to Leo Kotke sometime. Now there's a man who has mastered alternate tunings and slide.
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
I learned in "standard tuning". I Don't use tunings other than "drop D". (E-6 tuned to a D). So, whether you learn two languages at once, so to speak, or many, is up to the individual. It seems quite natural to a child growing up in a bilingual household to learn two languages simultaneously. Some of us barely can manage the one we've been exposed to since birth.

Steven Stills was pointed out above as an example of someone who constantly changes. Keep in mind he's also a rock legend.

You seem, (at least at the moment), to be struggling with the concepts of scales changing and chord formation. That's not a good, or even adequate preparation for learning multiple tunings. One thing that is required is a superb ear. You also need patience to learn the different scale or chord shapes required each time you change the tuning.

Listen to Leo Kotke sometime. Now there's a man who has mastered alternate tunings and slide.

Emm. Helpfull info brother.
At the moment, i am a complete online learner with four years of practice and learning 20 so metallica songs by tabs only. So just a music skeleton and a musical ear is reformed at very onstant.
So my plan is to get down to the most basic or logical tuning way to form SYMMETRY on the fretboard. And get started to spot down the notes, scales and chords on own.
Thanks again btw