#1
I have a Boss NS-2 right now that I run in front of my Mark iv. But I still get some hum that drives me crazy. Im thinking about getting an ISP decimator to put at the end of my fx loop. Good idea?

The G string works both in the loop and the fx at the same time, but if I already have an NS-2, wouldnt it be better to save some money and run the regular decimator + Ns2?

2012 Gibson Les Paul Classic Custom
2003 Gibson Les Paul Studio
Mesa Mark IV
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#2
I have the ISP, it doesn't worth in two places.

The first run through the pedal basically tracks the guitar signal & the second run cuts any unwanted noise.

I have mine just after my tuner & the first in my effects loop. If you put it at the end of your effects loop it will cut out any quiet delay signals.
#3
I used the NS-2 and Decimator set up for my DSL and pedalboard. It worked a damn sight better than using any single unit can. Run your guitar signal into the NS-2 and put your overdrive/EQ/compressor/etc pedals in the NS-2's loop. Then run that into the amp and stick the Decimator in the effect loop. The NS-2 has the controls and a subtle enough effect to only take out the noise from your guitar and the little bit that some pedals can add; the Decimator is much more heavy-handed, crap for guitar signal but great for the loop were you're trying to kill the noise brought on by the preamp.

If having as little noise is important to you then nothing can beat having multiple units, each tailored for a specific area of your rig. The Decimator G String is basically an NS-2 with less control and a heavier effect. Since you already have an NS-2 which is better for the signal going in to the amp, save your money and get a regular Decimator to put in the loop.
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#4
Quote by MrFlibble
I used the NS-2 and Decimator set up for my DSL and pedalboard. It worked a damn sight better than using any single unit can. Run your guitar signal into the NS-2 and put your overdrive/EQ/compressor/etc pedals in the NS-2's loop. Then run that into the amp and stick the Decimator in the effect loop. The NS-2 has the controls and a subtle enough effect to only take out the noise from your guitar and the little bit that some pedals can add; the Decimator is much more heavy-handed, crap for guitar signal but great for the loop were you're trying to kill the noise brought on by the preamp.

If having as little noise is important to you then nothing can beat having multiple units, each tailored for a specific area of your rig. The Decimator G String is basically an NS-2 with less control and a heavier effect. Since you already have an NS-2 which is better for the signal going in to the amp, save your money and get a regular Decimator to put in the loop.


Perfect! Thanks a lot for that.
Also... the only thing Im running in my loop is a dd7 delay and a reverb. Other than those 2 pedals, I use my tuner and ns-2.
So, I run:
Amp<tu-2<ns-2<guitar
Effect Return<reverb<dd7>Effect send.

Correct?

2012 Gibson Les Paul Classic Custom
2003 Gibson Les Paul Studio
Mesa Mark IV
Avatar Contemporary 6x12
#5
Looks backwards to me, but that could just be how I'm used to writing these things out.

I go:
Guitar > NS-2 input
NS-2 loop send > various pedals > NS-2 loop return
NS-2 out > amp input
Amp loop send > Decimator > various pedals > amp loop return

That kills as much noise as you can ever expect to kill with a valve amp. An ISP G String would simply add a loop within the amp's loop, which is completely pointless.

If the only other pedal you use before the amp is a tuner then you can go even easier on the NS-2's settings, though I would put the TU-2 before the NS-2 (so guitar > TU-2 > NS-2) so the TU-2 gets the very purist signal possible and it shouldn't effect the noise you get.
The delay and reverb should both go in the amp's loop, after whatever noise suppression/gate you put in there (in this case, the Decimator). Only distortion, overdrive, boost, compression and EQ effects should go before the noise gates or in their loops, since these are the effects that can add noise. Delays, reverbs and modulation effects should all go after any noise gates.

So, I guess for you it would be:
Guitar > TU-2 > NS-2 > preamp > Decimator > delay > reverb > power amp.

In that instance you probably could use the NS-2's loop for the preamp ('X' wiring: guitar in to the NS-2, NS-2's loop send to the amp, amp's loop send to the NS-2's loop return, NS-2's out to the amp's loop return) which would then have the NS-2 reducing noise on both the guitar's signal and the preamp, without having to buy a second unit. However, you're then stuck with the choice of either running the NS-2 with a heavy effect to deal with the preamp and killing your guitar signal or running it light to keep your guitar signal intact but then not having much of an effect on the preamp. This is why the NS-2 & Decimator combo is the best way to go.
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#6
Quote by MrFlibble
Looks backwards to me, but that could just be how I'm used to writing these things out.

I go:
Guitar > NS-2 input
NS-2 loop send > various pedals > NS-2 loop return
NS-2 out > amp input
Amp loop send > Decimator > various pedals > amp loop return

That kills as much noise as you can ever expect to kill with a valve amp. An ISP G String would simply add a loop within the amp's loop, which is completely pointless.

If the only other pedal you use before the amp is a tuner then you can go even easier on the NS-2's settings, though I would put the TU-2 before the NS-2 (so guitar > TU-2 > NS-2) so the TU-2 gets the very purist signal possible and it shouldn't effect the noise you get.
The delay and reverb should both go in the amp's loop, after whatever noise suppression/gate you put in there (in this case, the Decimator). Only distortion, overdrive, boost, compression and EQ effects should go before the noise gates or in their loops, since these are the effects that can add noise. Delays, reverbs and modulation effects should all go after any noise gates.

So, I guess for you it would be:
Guitar > TU-2 > NS-2 > preamp > Decimator > delay > reverb > power amp.

In that instance you probably could use the NS-2's loop for the preamp ('X' wiring: guitar in to the NS-2, NS-2's loop send to the amp, amp's loop send to the NS-2's loop return, NS-2's out to the amp's loop return) which would then have the NS-2 reducing noise on both the guitar's signal and the preamp, without having to buy a second unit. However, you're then stuck with the choice of either running the NS-2 with a heavy effect to deal with the preamp and killing your guitar signal or running it light to keep your guitar signal intact but then not having much of an effect on the preamp. This is why the NS-2 & Decimator combo is the best way to go.


Yeah, I've used the X pattern for about a year now and I'm just kinda tired of dealing with the sweet spot. WHen you say NS-2 > preamp. is the preamp just the front of the amp? (Instrument input?) and the power amp is the fx loop?

2012 Gibson Les Paul Classic Custom
2003 Gibson Les Paul Studio
Mesa Mark IV
Avatar Contemporary 6x12
#7
Quote by MrFlibble
I used the NS-2 and Decimator set up for my DSL and pedalboard. It worked a damn sight better than using any single unit can. Run your guitar signal into the NS-2 and put your overdrive/EQ/compressor/etc pedals in the NS-2's loop.


That's interesting, I've never considered that approach. May have to give it a try.
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#8
Also, I got a very noticable volume boost from my NS-2 when I used it in the X pattern. Does yours do the same? It is a VERY apparent boost. When I just put it in the front of the amp or fx loop, theres no volume boost.

Is that normal?

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Avatar Contemporary 6x12
#9
Quote by Forty6and2SDMF
Yeah, I've used the X pattern for about a year now and I'm just kinda tired of dealing with the sweet spot. WHen you say NS-2 > preamp. is the preamp just the front of the amp? (Instrument input?) and the power amp is the fx loop?
Yes. Preamp = instrument input.

Quote by Offworld92
That's interesting, I've never considered that approach. May have to give it a try.
It's how Boss designed it to be used and is what their manual says to do I had it for about a year before I came across the 'X' way and I couldn't get my head around it, seemed bizarre to me to use something designed for pedals to quieten a preamp.

Quote by Forty6and2SDMF
Also, I got a very noticable volume boost from my NS-2 when I used it in the X pattern. Does yours do the same? It is a VERY apparent boost. When I just put it in the front of the amp or fx loop, theres no volume boost.

Is that normal?
Not that I'm aware. I say that because my DSL was pretty worn-in, noisy and had problems with putting stuff in the loop anyway. I can't say it was ever a volume boost I noticed though, nor have I heard of such a thing happening with the NS-2. Maybe the NS-2 works as a buffer and Boss don't list it? I know a couple of their pedals do.
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