#1
Hello, just wondering if someone could help me figure this out...

Its a song from zelda...lol...but I really like the composition and am curious how it works

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lh123hQo2-0


I figured out the chords in the second part at 28 seconds and they are:

FMaj7, e minor7, d minor 7, CMaj7

F Maj7, e minor 7, D#7, dminor 7, then GMaj


I am curious why the D#7 was used...

and just what the key is and if it changes keys at any point
#2
It is just in C major, the D#7 just really adds tension it's not technically in the key, but it leads down to the D minor 7 quite nicely. Basically, the D#7 was used because it sounsd good.
#3
You've spelt the chord wrong, it should theorectically be an Eb7. I haven't heard it, but it seems to be a quick tonicisation into D minor, Koji Kondo just used a tritone sub of A7 which is the V7 of Dm to get Eb7. Although theoretically the Em would need to be an Em7b5 to make a iio bV7/V7 i. Which leads smoothly back into Dm7 which is the ii of C Major. If he followed it back up with a V7 in C, that would make complete sense. I'll tell you later if I'm right or not after I've heard it.
#4
^ this

Eb7 = bV7/V in D

So he briefly tonicizes the Dm7 which is v of the following Gmaj which in turn is the V of of the
tonic Cmaj. A circle progression which gives a nice descending chromatic root progression.

Don't agree that Em7 should be substituted by Em7b5, cause that B in Em7 leads to Bb in Eb and then to A in Dm7, which gives you a double chromatic progression. Especially since
the Fmaj7 contains a C so:
C > B > Bb > A (all fifths)
F > E > Eb > D (all roots)
Last edited by deHufter at Mar 18, 2013,
#5
Quote by deHufter
^ this

Don't agree that Em7 should be substituted by Em7b5, cause that B in Em7 leads to Bb in Eb and then to A in Dm7, which gives you a double chromatic progression. Especially since
the Fmaj7 contains a C so:
C > B > Bb > A (all fifths)
F > E > Eb > D (all roots)


Yeah, sorry my mistake there. I had 2 minutes left on the computer so I didn't have time to recheck what I wrote.
#7
That Eb7's got 9th in the arpeggio, as well. Arpeggios with step-wise relationship make for dreamy music, hence all the 7th chords.