#1
OK, so a bit of a story behind this.

When I was 10-12, I was a top singer for my age. I won gold at the local singing competitions and the like. Then I stopped singing because it was seen as uncool, and because it clashed with my sports.

Now, as an 18-year-old guy, I'd like to get back into singing. Obviously since then my voice has changed a lot, and when I've recorded myself I've thought I've sounded absolutely horrible, quite frankly. When I've sung at church worship and stuff, people next to me have told me I can sing, and I was even given a mic to do backing for the youth band (I already play guitar for it).

So my questions to you:

How best would I get back into singing at a good level?
Is it possible for someone to change from a quality singer to an audibly unenjoyable one through voice-breakage?
What are some good, recentish, popular songs that are dead easy to play on guitar (preferably lower-range songs as I find I struggle to hold high notes nicely nowadays, although it doesn't matter as I can just transpose the songs lower down).
eg, I've dabbled with stuff like "Don't you worry child accoustic version," "Jar of Hearts," Maroon 5 stuff, Adele stuff, "Somebody that I used to know" etc. So that sort of type of singing, all just with an acoustic guitar.

I understand it's a bit of a mishmash of an OP, with multiple questions and the like, but I guess it reflects my confused nature wrt my singing.
#2
Honestly, a few lessons would probably go a long way to get your fundamentals back in place.
#3
I would of thought getting singing lessons would of been the obvious solution to this?

And practice.


So much practice.
#4
Yeah nah I don't see myself committing to it to the degree that I'll get lessons. I've always been a self-taught guy... Self taught drums, guitar and bass. It's more a hobby, so I'm not keen to go to the extent that I'd get lessons.
#5
The problem is that a lot of learning how to sing is learning how to feel and be aware of things that you aren't aware of. Most people can tell when their fingers aren't pressing down on their frets in the right way, and can experiment until they get it right.

It's really hard to do that with singing. We have a certain degree of proprioceptive conditioning, which can lead us to think that we're doing something "right" when we're not. A lot of the value of a teacher is being able to recognize a problem, and pointing out what you're doing wrong until you reprogram yourself.

I suspect that part of why you feel you sound horrible is because, like a lot of untrained people, when you try to sing lead you end up trying to copy the original singer's timbre rather than creating a round, full tone and then putting a timbre on top of it. It's like putting a great paint job on a building with no foundation.
#6
Quote by HotspurJr
The problem is that a lot of learning how to sing is learning how to feel and be aware of things that you aren't aware of. Most people can tell when their fingers aren't pressing down on their frets in the right way, and can experiment until they get it right.

It's really hard to do that with singing. We have a certain degree of proprioceptive conditioning, which can lead us to think that we're doing something "right" when we're not. A lot of the value of a teacher is being able to recognize a problem, and pointing out what you're doing wrong until you reprogram yourself.

I suspect that part of why you feel you sound horrible is because, like a lot of untrained people, when you try to sing lead you end up trying to copy the original singer's timbre rather than creating a round, full tone and then putting a timbre on top of it. It's like putting a great paint job on a building with no foundation.
Haha, I lol'd at the last paragraph because it is something I realised I was doing last night. I tried to not do it, and I would definitely say I improved asa a result.

I'll try get a sound recording up at some point.