#1
I've never really thought about this before, but wouldn't use a capo massively alter your scale length? Does this have an effect on producing harmonics (pinch or natural)?
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#2
not really, not for me anyway, just make sure you go with the Capo, so if its on the 2nd fret, make sure the harmonic you hit is two half steps up the neck. And it does have an effect on pinch harmonics, but you can still hit them.
Last edited by SteveJB1989 at Mar 19, 2013,
#3
Quote by SteveJB1989
not really, not for me anyway, just make sure you go with the Capo, so if its on the 2nd fret, make sure the harmonic you hit is two half steps up the neck. And it does have an effect on pinch harmonics, but you can still hit them.

+1
I've never known anyone do pinch hamonics with a capo on though.

If you're just wanting to be in a different key for a song, check out the Digitech Whammy DT. Allows you to play a song in a different tuning without adjusting.
Last edited by AndyGray at Mar 19, 2013,
#4
It affects the timbre, especially on acoustic guitars.

I often transpose something purely for the timbre you can get. It's one of the wonders of guitar for me.

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#5
im my experience, capos can actually be really cool for getting harmonics you wouldn't normally get with the standard scale length (yes, technically, a capo shortens the scale length). It's also a quick way to breathe some new life into songwriting. when i come up with a riff I usually end up transposing it with a capo just to get a different vibe. Keyser is the best brand imo.