#1
I am just wondering Why I get sounds from strings on my guitar that are not touched? example if i pick the high E string I can hear the high E string but also a dull sound from the amp which comes from other strings that have not been touched .
#2
its a phantom thing!!
Nah have you tried changing leads or the amp?
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Quote by Wolfinator-x
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Quote by Doveri
Well a human can't sing an Em since that's a chord

If you mean Eb3/E3, then that is a contralto voice.
#3
Quote by Eissac123
its a phantom thing!!
Nah have you tried changing leads or the amp?

I have had the problem for sometime i have not tried changing the lead but i will pick one up tonight and give it a try. Because of the unwanted sound i try to mute other string as much as i can but really i dont understand how sound can be picked up from strings that are not touched
#4
Quote by dazzzer30
I have had the problem for sometime i have not tried changing the lead but i will pick one up tonight and give it a try. Because of the unwanted sound i try to mute other string as much as i can but really i dont understand how sound can be picked up from strings that are not touched

well that happened to me before and the reason was all three actually, my amp was stuffed, The lead needed fixing and when i picked a D string i was getting a B sound too because when i picked it somehow idk how but the wind as the guy called it dragged aross and blew both the G and B without me hearing the G.... Crazy right!
To The World I Am A Stranger, To A Stranger I Am A Possible Serial Killer


Quote by Wolfinator-x
You guys are so funny xD xoxo <3

Quote by Doveri
Well a human can't sing an Em since that's a chord

If you mean Eb3/E3, then that is a contralto voice.
#5
Quote by Eissac123
well that happened to me before and the reason was all three actually, my amp was stuffed, The lead needed fixing and when i picked a D string i was getting a B sound too because when i picked it somehow idk how but the wind as the guy called it dragged aross and blew both the G and B without me hearing the G.... Crazy right!

My amp is new , When I hit the high E and B strings I also get sound from the low E and D string , its a low dull ring sound hard to Explain the sound but you wouldnt know it was them string unless you mute them then the sound stops, thats how i know it was the strings making that sound .
#6
Ahhhhhh i get where your coming at now
To The World I Am A Stranger, To A Stranger I Am A Possible Serial Killer


Quote by Wolfinator-x
You guys are so funny xD xoxo <3

Quote by Doveri
Well a human can't sing an Em since that's a chord

If you mean Eb3/E3, then that is a contralto voice.
#7
What type of guitr?
The vibrations maybe transfering through the bridge
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#8
Have you practised muting? You should always touch, the strings that are not played lightly. With your fretting hand use your index finger to mute the strings that are below the lowest (highest if you look from sound perspecive) and with your palm of your picking hand lightly touch the strings that are above. If there is only one string (like Low E) that needs muting tou can also use the tip of your index (or whatever is fretting the highest string) finger.

Good muting technique is necessary when dealing with high gain because the amp picks up every single vibration the strings get. When you pick a string, it does vibrate the body of your guitar which is then transferred to other strings.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Mar 19, 2013,
#9
What you are describing happens with all guitars. to simplify things a little, it's because when you pluck a string, the vibration is transferred to the body, which is then transferred back into all the strings including the ones you didn't play. So the strings you aren't playing will ring out lightly unless you mute them. You had the right idea when you were muting them
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#10
Quote by Robbgnarly
What type of guitr?
The vibrations maybe transfering through the bridge

Epiphone Joe Perry Boneyard
#11
Quote by Blompcube
What you are describing happens with all guitars. to simplify things a little, it's because when you pluck a string, the vibration is transferred to the body, which is then transferred back into all the strings including the ones you didn't play. So the strings you aren't playing will ring out lightly unless you mute them. You had the right idea when you were muting them


True, it's simple physics, really. When plucking a string you are driving all the other string simultaniously via the nut and the bridge. Only the strings that are tuned to the same frequency (or a multiple of that frequency) of the plucked string will start vibrating. It's some sort of feedback, but through your ax instead of your amp. Try detuning your high E string to a completely random frequency and pluck it again, and see if the problem persists.
#12
it is called sympathetic vibrations. I know no one likes the term but the djent guys normally have thing around the nut to quell those vibrations, to help them keep tight. Check Keith Marrow, MAB uses an apparatus on his double necks, and Synyster Gates uses like a scrunchie.
#13
Quote by Xtinct Dark
True, it's simple physics, really. When plucking a string you are driving all the other string simultaniously via the nut and the bridge. Only the strings that are tuned to the same frequency (or a multiple of that frequency) of the plucked string will start vibrating. It's some sort of feedback, but through your ax instead of your amp. Try detuning your high E string to a completely random frequency and pluck it again, and see if the problem persists.

yep i detuned the high E string seems to lower it alot , but if i pluck the B string it also happend , also there is unwanted sound from the A string but its not as loud as the low E but together they both make the unwanted sound. Do you think i should get a new guitar
#14
Quote by dazzzer30
yep i detuned the high E string seems to lower it alot , but if i pluck the B string it also happend , also there is unwanted sound from the A string but its not as loud as the low E but together they both make the unwanted sound. Do you think i should get a new guitar



No, its not a guitar issue but a technique issue.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oe8J-rcYf0c


Start practising. New guitar will do you no good as it will have exactly the same phenomenom. Thats how guitar work.

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Cort EVL-K47B

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Mar 19, 2013,
#15
Quote by MaaZeus
No, its not a guitar issue but a technique issue.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oe8J-rcYf0c


Start practising. New guitar will do you no good as it will have exactly the same phenomenom. Thats how guitar work.

yer but the guy is picking all the strings i would expect to hear unwanted sound if i did that too, i am talking about plucking one string even just an open string and getting unwanted sound from one or two strings i have not touched ? I am sorry but this has nothing to do with technique .
#16
Quote by dazzzer30
yer but the guy is picking all the strings i would expect to hear unwanted sound if i did that too, i am talking about plucking one string even just an open string and getting unwanted sound from one or two strings i have not touched ? I am sorry but this has nothing to do with technique .

What you are seeing in that video is, the guy is picking a string and other strings are ringing out while he is not picking them. he might play a scale across all strings but it's the same thing that is happening - strings that he isn't playing are starting to ring out while he isn't playing them, because the resonance of the string has transferred to the body and the resonance of the body has caused other strings to start vibrating.

It has everything to do with technique - you arrived at the right answer yourself, when you said you were muting the strings you weren't playing, to stop them from making any unwanted sounds. That's what we all do.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#17
Quote by dazzzer30
yer but the guy is picking all the strings i would expect to hear unwanted sound if i did that too, i am talking about plucking one string even just an open string and getting unwanted sound from one or two strings i have not touched ? I am sorry but this has nothing to do with technique .



Yes it is. Even if you pick only one string, let it be A, the rest of your index finger should lightly resting on D, G, C, B and e strings, muting them and preventing them from ringing out from vibration. Wit acoustic this is less of an issue but is absolutely mandatory for electric guitar because it amplifies every singe noise, especially on high gain.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
Last edited by MaaZeus at Mar 19, 2013,
#18
How loud is your amp when this happens? Does it happen if you set the guitar on a stand near the amp and just let it sit there? Not trying to be funny. If you have the amp cranked enough you can get the same effect without even touching your guitar. The noise from a loud amp can cause the lower strings to start vibrating and then they feed each other getting louder and louder and the string starts to vibrate more and more.

Can you tell if the strings that start ringing without picking them are vibrating?
#19
Quote by thehikingdude
How loud is your amp when this happens? Does it happen if you set the guitar on a stand near the amp and just let it sit there? Not trying to be funny. If you have the amp cranked enough you can get the same effect without even touching your guitar. The noise from a loud amp can cause the lower strings to start vibrating and then they feed each other getting louder and louder and the string starts to vibrate more and more.

Can you tell if the strings that start ringing without picking them are vibrating?

yes the strings are vibrating well mostly the low E and A and not so much but D string , I have been playing a lot of fast lead - solos and its not easy to start mute strings when your playing fast solos I do mute them when playing power chords . I play on my friends guitar and didnt notice it but maybe it was there but just not as noticeable as on my guitar .