#1
Im really curious if i got it right, you can use major scale and the minor pentatonic scale together, does the scale have some seperate name. Or are they just seperate scales.

http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/b/bb_king/lucille_intro_tab.htm

Is this song D# Major + some minor scale?

If anyone can tell me what scales are mixed and how they´re named i would appreciate it very much! Thanks in advance!
#2
It's Blues, so yes definitely you can. But furthermore if you want to play like B.B. King. Dont think of it as mixing scales but just get familiar with the sounds of the major intervals, 3rds 6ths, 9ths, and so on and know when to mix them in, like hear it.
Screw patterns, get to know every single Interval and how they sound all over the neck, thats the most organized you can get really, after that its all up to your ear, but if you really know the sounds of the intervals, you know where to go, having the knowledge of where evrything is.

you can mix the "scales" for starters, but later you will have to leave it or it will sound very boring, so this is just a head up.
Ofcourse you can mix the minor and major pentatonic and call it "superimposed blues scale" or whatever but thats garbage. and all tones wont be represented anyway.

In Blues every note and the notes between the notes have their place, listen to the blues and experiment so much that you'll get it.
And by the way, if you wanna play real blues, and especially solos, Stop using TAB!
Get the records, listen to them, slow them down if you have to, get dedicated, and cop what they do by listening, note by note.
And analyze it all while your doing it, this is the best way, and will improve your ear by tons.

Have fun
Last edited by Ignore at Mar 19, 2013,
#5
Quote by Ignore
It's Blues, so yes definitely you can. But furthermore if you want to play like B.B. King. Dont think of it as mixing scales but just get familiar with the sounds of the major intervals, 3rds 6ths, 9ths, and so on and know when to mix them in, like hear it.
Screw patterns, get to know every single Interval and how they sound all over the neck, thats the most organized you can get really, after that its all up to your ear, but if you really know the sounds of the intervals, you know where to go, having the knowledge of where evrything is.

you can mix the "scales" for starters, but later you will have to leave it or it will sound very boring, so this is just a head up.
Ofcourse you can mix the minor and major pentatonic and call it "superimposed blues scale" or whatever but thats garbage. and all tones wont be represented anyway.

In Blues every note and the notes between the notes have their place, listen to the blues and experiment so much that you'll get it.
And by the way, if you wanna play real blues, and especially solos, Stop using TAB!
Get the records, listen to them, slow them down if you have to, get dedicated, and cop what they do by listening, note by note.
And analyze it all while your doing it, this is the best way, and will improve your ear by tons.

Have fun


Holy crap i got what i wanted to know and more! Thanks for replying dude!!
#7
Quote by mdc
^Are you going to do all that, though? Like, really?

Ive been playing all the songs i know by ear.. only some metal songs i couldnt handle.
I think i understand the fretboard pretty good.
#10
I can play the minor pentatonic scale with the natural minor scale quite well, but I have trouble mixing the relevant major scale in with these
#11
Don't mix in the relevant major scale....you're going about it wrong.

Take the major 3rd and use it as a passing tone. Also, be cognizant of chord tones in the changes. You cannot nor should you reduce or try to fit understanding into the "everything makes a new scale" type of approach. Think in terms of musicality, and these little different notes as notes of "color" and you'll be better off.

Whoever called the notes "blue" notes, I think has expanded the widely accepted convention, that the b5 is the "blue note"...

*shrug*

Best,

Sean
#13
He's "using" mixolydian with a flat third and b5 as passing tones.

That being said I hate speaking about theory when it comes to blues.

Blues is one of those things where you just learn by mimicking your heroes. Theory helps (being able to follow chords especially), but after all the basic stuff its just working on phrasing and being vocal with your guitar playing.

You're on the right path, learn that solo, then learn more. Then learn the penatonic scale up and down the neck, and see how his licks fit into it (sometimes it wont fit exactly, he adds a 6th and 2nd often). If you can find a lesson the "BB Box" that will help. Anyway, after try and do things like play a lick then find out how to play the same lick up the neck, down the neck, in every octave, etc.
Last edited by ouchies at Mar 20, 2013,
#14
Quote by skilly1
I can play the minor pentatonic scale with the natural minor scale quite well, but I have trouble mixing the relevant major scale in with these


I didn't really mean this, I'm still learning, I thought the major scale and the natural minor scale were completely different scales altogether, but I can see they both have the same notes, just different root notes,
However the major scale is described as being upbeat happy scale whereas the minor is sad,
I find when I play the pentatonic with the natural minor (also the major scale except different root note)
It exclusively sounds sad, I guess it depends how you use it and in what context,
Am I understanding this correctly?
#15
yes you do, it does depend on the context and how you use it. But just forget about what scale to use and play what fits in best for your taste. When you know your intervals all over the neck you will instantly know if youre playing major or minor diminished or augmented intervals, that way you will learn. that way youre free. Just go from one note to the next.
#16
Ok cool, I guess a good way of learning the intervals is improvising all over the neck playing whatever you feel and using these scales, and after time you begin to recognize them as second nature
#17
yes the most important thing is playing them, hearing them and knowing what they are. What helped me alot was i learned the degrees and where they sat very much like i learned the notes on the fretboard, i studied them and did a lot of memory work. After a while i started hearing the differences very clearly and now its at a point where i hear a sound in my head and i know where to go because i know thats where the b3 is and so on. Also i dont have to actually think about it very often, my fingers now the interval leaps by now and therefor i can "feel" where i have to go. Also im better with some intervals then others, but thats just a time thing, work on it, be dedicated and you'll get it.