Page 1 of 2
#1
Ok theory hounds, help me out here...
I know the chords for C Ionian are:
I C Maj
ii Dm
iii Em
IV F Maj
V G Maj
vi Am
vii Bm Dim

So if I want to construct something in D Dorian, do I still follow the same chords as C Ionian, just starting from the ii chord?
Like this:
i Dm
ii Em
III F Maj
IV G Maj
v Am
vi Bm Dim
VII C Maj

And so on. E Phrygian starting from the iii relative to C Ionian?
Am I getting this right?
Thanks in advance!
#4
What do you understand of tonal harmony, cadences and the like?


Quite honestly, not much. I have a half-ass idea of cadence as a phrase, usually a chord or two leading to a tonal resolution.
Tonal harmony I'm not sure, by definition.

I've been playing guitar for 27 years pretty steadily. I've done some very minor gigging, but mostly just enjoy jamming with friends and other musicians in a laid back garage/basement type setting.

I've always been self taught, but I started taking lessons to learn theory for the first time ever, just a little less than a year ago. I work a ton, so I've taken a break from the lessons just to catch up to what I've been taught so far.

We basically ended last with the circle of fifths using 7th chords. I can successfully determine chords diatonically with in each key, but these are all major keys, or Ionian modes as I understand. I'm now trying to apply what I know to determine basic major/minor chords in other modes.

I may very well be in over my head, and if I am, please don't hesitate to express it.
This whole thing is kind of a self test on where I'm at and what I understand.

Thanks for the reply!

Edit: What I'm calling BmDim in the OP could also be Bmb5 I guess.
Last edited by TheGroundZero at Mar 21, 2013,
#5
I'd suggest stepping back from modes and concentrate on tonal harmony. I'm still working on it so I won't start telling you what to learn as there are better people of this forum who could do the job.

Diatonically the triad built off the 7th degree in the major scale is a diminished triad. Often written as mb5. So you are not wrong there.
#6
i read the thread title and i literally inhaled and clutched my stomach out of pain for my soul
modes are a social construct
#7
Quote by TheGroundZero
Quite honestly, not much. I have a half-ass idea of cadence as a phrase, usually a chord or two leading to a tonal resolution.
Tonal harmony I'm not sure, by definition.

I've been playing guitar for 27 years pretty steadily. I've done some very minor gigging, but mostly just enjoy jamming with friends and other musicians in a laid back garage/basement type setting.

I've always been self taught, but I started taking lessons to learn theory for the first time ever, just a little less than a year ago. I work a ton, so I've taken a break from the lessons just to catch up to what I've been taught so far.

We basically ended last with the circle of fifths using 7th chords. I can successfully determine chords diatonically with in each key, but these are all major keys, or Ionian modes as I understand. I'm now trying to apply what I know to determine basic major/minor chords in other modes.

I may very well be in over my head, and if I am, please don't hesitate to express it.
This whole thing is kind of a self test on where I'm at and what I understand.

Thanks for the reply!

Edit: What I'm calling BmDim in the OP could also be Bmb5 I guess.

Yeah... Maybe focus more on keys... Many times you aren't really even playing the modes and it would be more reasonable to think in keys. For example in minor you can use a major IV chord (that gives it kind of "dorian sound"). It doesn't necessarily mean that you are playing modally. Same with major. You can use the bVII chord (that gives it kind of "mixolydian sound") and actually you are just playing in a major key. And I wouldn't use "ionian" or "aeolian" instead of major and minor. They are just outdated and pretty much have no use.

But the thing is, you can use whatever chords in a key. Major and minor keys aren't limited to seven notes or chords, you can use all the 12 notes. You are playing either in major or minor, depending on the chord the progression resolves to. If it resolves to a minor chord, it's in a minor key and if it resolves to a major chord, it's in a major key. I know modes have fancy, exotic names that make you think they sound better than "basic minor and major" but it's just better to explain tonal music with keys. (Modal music =/= tonal music and today's music is tonal.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 21, 2013,
#8
You know as much as you need to about diatonic modes.

The really important tonal concepts relate to harmonic motion, and they apply regardless of whether a piece utilizes non-ionian modes.

The big thing is not to let yourself get boxed in by the idea that you're only "allowed" to use diatonic modes in music. Most interesting music uses key borrowing and non-diatonic stuff.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 21, 2013,
#9
Thanks to everyone who took the time to offer advice. I do appreciate it.
It's obviously time to re-up the lessons.

Quote by Hail
i read the thread title and i literally inhaled and clutched my stomach out of pain for my soul
Why so much negativity? I'm 42 years old, not 15.
#10
Quote by TheGroundZero


Why so much negativity? I'm 42 years old, not 15.


i'm not convinced
modes are a social construct
#11
Imo modes are just as important as scales (unless you have a great sense of chord scale/arpeggio matching & can play well through the changes; and even then they are not bad to know for things such as blues or songs like bossa blue). It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale; this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience. This is a line in G major that modulates through the modes in a really nice sounding manner and can be used in many many situations(definitely helped me start understand how to use modes a little better though I still have a long way to go) {transpose this into all keys & memorize(order of modes used Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & resolves on Ionian)

E|-------------15-14----12----------------------------------12-14-15-12-------------
B|-------12-15-------15----15-12-13-12----------------12-13-------------13-15-13-12-
G|-12-14-------------------------------14-12----12-14-------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------14-------------------------------------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------10------------
G|-14-12-11----------12-11-------9---------------------------------9----12-11/12---
D|----------14-12-10-------10-12---10-9-10-12-9-------9-------9-10-----------------
A|----------------------------------------------10-12---10-12----------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#12
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Imo modes are just as important as scales (unless you have a great sense of chord scale/arpeggio matching & can play well through the changes; and even then they are not bad to know for things such as blues or songs like bossa blue). It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale; this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience. This is a line in G major that modulates through the modes in a really nice sounding manner and can be used in many many situations(definitely helped me start understand how to use modes a little better though I still have a long way to go) {transpose this into all keys & memorize(order of modes used Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & resolves on Ionian)

E|-------------15-14----12----------------------------------12-14-15-12-------------
B|-------12-15-------15----15-12-13-12----------------12-13-------------13-15-13-12-
G|-12-14-------------------------------14-12----12-14-------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------14-------------------------------------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------10------------
G|-14-12-11----------12-11-------9---------------------------------9----12-11/12---
D|----------14-12-10-------10-12---10-9-10-12-9-------9-------9-10-----------------
A|----------------------------------------------10-12---10-12----------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Ignore all of this. Don't bother memorizing any shapes and don't worry about impressing "advanced players".
#13
Quote by derek8520
Ignore all of this. Don't bother memorizing any shapes and don't worry about impressing "advanced players".

thanks for bringing my blood pressure back down, i think that post gave me a hernia
modes are a social construct
#14
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Imo modes are just as important as scales (unless you have a great sense of chord scale/arpeggio matching & can play well through the changes; and even then they are not bad to know for things such as blues or songs like bossa blue). It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale; this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience. This is a line in G major that modulates through the modes in a really nice sounding manner and can be used in many many situations(definitely helped me start understand how to use modes a little better though I still have a long way to go) {transpose this into all keys & memorize(order of modes used Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & resolves on Ionian)

E|-------------15-14----12----------------------------------12-14-15-12-------------
B|-------12-15-------15----15-12-13-12----------------12-13-------------13-15-13-12-
G|-12-14-------------------------------14-12----12-14-------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------14-------------------------------------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------10------------
G|-14-12-11----------12-11-------9---------------------------------9----12-11/12---
D|----------14-12-10-------10-12---10-9-10-12-9-------9-------9-10-----------------
A|----------------------------------------------10-12---10-12----------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

uh

um

wow

???
#15
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Imo modes are just as important as scales (unless you have a great sense of chord scale/arpeggio matching & can play well through the changes; and even then they are not bad to know for things such as blues or songs like bossa blue). It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale; this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience. This is a line in G major that modulates through the modes in a really nice sounding manner and can be used in many many situations(definitely helped me start understand how to use modes a little better though I still have a long way to go) {transpose this into all keys & memorize(order of modes used Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & resolves on Ionian)

E|-------------15-14----12----------------------------------12-14-15-12-------------
B|-------12-15-------15----15-12-13-12----------------12-13-------------13-15-13-12-
G|-12-14-------------------------------14-12----12-14-------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------14-------------------------------------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------10------------
G|-14-12-11----------12-11-------9---------------------------------9----12-11/12---
D|----------14-12-10-------10-12---10-9-10-12-9-------9-------9-10-----------------
A|----------------------------------------------10-12---10-12----------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To the OP:
Sure you could look at modes that way, but the more important question is why would you want to? It's kind of like trying to walk down the street while spinning in a circle. You still get to the same place, but it's a lot more work to do all the spinning and it serves no purpose.

The whole deal with the diatonic chords from a scale is that they each serve a function in regard to the tonic. Changing the order you look at those chords does nothing to change that. The original V is still gonna wanna pull to the I. The thing about modes is you're basically trying to tonicize a different note other than the major or minor chord, which is a lot more work to accomplish unless you wanna just play drones or vamps. & even then, you could still just look at it as major or minor with clever use of accidentals. Why make something more complicated than it has to be?
I'm an
Engeneer
Enginear
Enginere

I'm Good at Math
#16
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Imo modes are just as important as scales (unless you have a great sense of chord scale/arpeggio matching & can play well through the changes; and even then they are not bad to know for things such as blues or songs like bossa blue). It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale; this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience. This is a line in G major that modulates through the modes in a really nice sounding manner and can be used in many many situations(definitely helped me start understand how to use modes a little better though I still have a long way to go) {transpose this into all keys & memorize(order of modes used Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & resolves on Ionian)

E|-------------15-14----12----------------------------------12-14-15-12-------------
B|-------12-15-------15----15-12-13-12----------------12-13-------------13-15-13-12-
G|-12-14-------------------------------14-12----12-14-------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------14-------------------------------------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------10------------
G|-14-12-11----------12-11-------9---------------------------------9----12-11/12---
D|----------14-12-10-------10-12---10-9-10-12-9-------9-------9-10-----------------
A|----------------------------------------------10-12---10-12----------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------



I dare all of you to try using it over something in G major, I promise you it will sound not bad if not great. So, until you try it out, I don't want to hear your opinions.

Yea, no shit, obviously this isn't the way to use modes your whole life; but it is a good place to start applying (1,2,3,4,5,6,7), (1,2,b3,4,5,b6,b7), (1,2,b3,4,5,6,b7), (1,2,3,4,5,6,b7),(1,2,3,#4,5,6,7), (1,b2,b3,4,5,b6,b7), (1,2,b3,4,5,6,b7), & (1,2,3,4,5,6,7) if you don't know the intervals well enough to think of the modes off the top of your head.


In the beginning it's muscle memory & training your ear to hear things such as modes. This is a great exercise for both of those things.

Give me a good reason why this would not help one's playing, muscle memory, & ear? I see a whole lot of talking & offering little that one could apply right this instant to an actual musical situation.


....anyways back to homework
#17
can you write something in G major?

i don't see a reason why you should worry about writing something over a key if you can't write the chords that define the key in the first place
modes are a social construct
#18
If you meant to explain how to use modes as coloration against a key, it'd probably easier to break that thing down into smaller chunks.

The way you put there, you're just playing accidentals. That's key borrowing, not modality. Playing a Bb in the key of G doesn't mean you're using a different mode for that one note; you actually have to build a phrase around it to establish a harmonic relationship.

Modality in the modern sense really means weakening the tonic, not playing to/against it with accidentals that happen to be drawn from whatever mode of the tonic.

Example: a chord spelled D A C E G (low to high). Your ear hears D as the tonic, but nothing else implies a typical "D" harmony. You're basically bound to a set of notes rather than a pattern of root movement. If you follow that with a chord spelled E A B C# F#, you're changing the mode in terms of what notes you use, not just root and intervals.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 22, 2013,
#19
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale
What does this even mean?

Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience.
Who cares? You make music for the sake of making music, not for the sake of impressing more advanced players. I mean, it's a bonus, but it's inherently a waste of time.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Mar 22, 2013,
#20
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
I don't want to hear your opinions.

excellent, the feeling's mutual

i'd normally say your post is completely off the mark, but you're so unfathomably incorrect here that "the mark" is currently on a different plane of existence and i therefore cannot accurately compare the locations of the two

what in the world are you even saying? you wrote "this is a line in g major that modulates through the modes", and until you explain what you meant (please do) i can't go into more detail simply because i have no idea what you're attempting to do here since it's so wildly awful

your entire post gives me the impression that you set up a bingo board with meaningless musical buzzwords on your desk and attempted to successfully get a bingo in the shortest amount of time
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Give me a good reason why this would not help one's playing, I see a whole lot of talking & offering little that one could apply right this instant to an actual musical situation.

it appears you're making the assumption that you've provided something that "one could apply right this instant to an actual musical situation"

please don't assume that
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
....anyways back to homework

if it's related to music, hire a tutor immediately
Last edited by :-D at Mar 22, 2013,
#21
That phrase sounds good to me, I use it sometimes; when I want to throw in a little lead, I'd rather throw in some "coloration" phrases like that & focus on making the notes swing more than thinking about whether or not I should use a G phrygian dominant or G Super Locrian for a G7#5 chord.(and I can usually get away with it sounding alright.)


Plus, I might as well not even play lead when preforming, the group of friends I make music with are all better than me.

I'm sorry okay, I don't exactly understand music theory, I'm trying to learn; I just play what I think sounds good & try to simply things for myself.

Playing over a Gm7, C7b9, Fmaj9, Fmaj9; I think G dorian for the ii, C phrygian dominant for the V, & F lydian for the I. This is how I try to practice when I have time, I'm just not at the point where I can consistently apply it in musical situations.
#22
Quote by :-D
if it's related to music, hire a tutor immediately


No, I am not going to school for music. Once I'm done with my education I do plan on getting lessons.
#23
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor

I'm sorry okay, I don't exactly understand music theory, I'm trying to learn; I just play what I think sounds good & try to simply things for myself.

this is good

Playing over a Gm7, C7b9, Fmaj9, Fmaj9; I think G dorian for the ii, C phrygian dominant for the V, & F lydian for the I. This is how I try to practice when I have time, I'm just not at the point where I can consistently apply it in musical situations.

this is very, very bad
modes are a social construct
#24
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Imo modes are just as important as scales (unless you have a great sense of chord scale/arpeggio matching & can play well through the changes; and even then they are not bad to know for things such as blues or songs like bossa blue). It's important to get some implied modal phrases inside the major scale; this will really impress the more advanced players in your audience. This is a line in G major that modulates through the modes in a really nice sounding manner and can be used in many many situations(definitely helped me start understand how to use modes a little better though I still have a long way to go) {transpose this into all keys & memorize(order of modes used Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & resolves on Ionian)

E|-------------15-14----12----------------------------------12-14-15-12-------------
B|-------12-15-------15----15-12-13-12----------------12-13-------------13-15-13-12-
G|-12-14-------------------------------14-12----12-14-------------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------14-------------------------------------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------10------------
G|-14-12-11----------12-11-------9---------------------------------9----12-11/12---
D|----------14-12-10-------10-12---10-9-10-12-9-------9-------9-10-----------------
A|----------------------------------------------10-12---10-12----------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

How are you using modes here? It all fits in G major scale. And it's kind of stupid to say what key it's in if there are no chords in the background, though IMO that was pretty obviously a melody in G major. I don't see how this would be using modes.

And I don't know if that sounded good or not because there's no rhythm or chords.

Playing over a Gm7, C7b9, Fmaj9, Fmaj9; I think G dorian for the ii, C phrygian dominant for the V, & F lydian for the I. This is how I try to practice when I have time, I'm just not at the point where I can consistently apply it in musical situations.


Why don't you just think "F major, F major, F major, F major"? You are playing in F major all the time. And you are also allowed to use accidentals of course.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 22, 2013,
#25
he doesn't know the difference between keys and scales cause he's a moron MM ignore him
modes are a social construct
#26
Thanks again everyone for chiming in. Like I said, I think it's time to get back to lessons.
I guess what really prompted me to start this thread was trying to understand what chords I have available to me in any given mode. The reason why, is because I've been using modal backing tracks on youtube to practice my lead, and general knowledge of the fretboard. I'd like to make some of my own backing tracks for personal use.

I really enjoy the sound and feel of the Dorian tracks. Therefore the original question I asked.
If I want to make a backing track in G Dorian(for example), shouldn't any chords I use contain only the notes in the Dorian mode? Or should I just look at it as Fmaj or Dm? Or should I just be thinking of it as Gm with a raised 6th? This is where I'm getting lost. All three of these(G Dorian, Fmaj(Ionian), Dm(Aeolian)) all use the same notes. That's why, to me, it made since to use the chords in the example in my OP.

Now my head is really spinning. I'm starting to lose myself now...

Anyway, thanks again to everyone trying to help. The replies here have definitely made me want to get back to lessons due to my lack of knowledge and the amount of dissent between different replies. It's sometimes hard to decipher what's correct and what isn't.

@Hail: I'm still not sure why all the hate toward others? If you can correct someone, fine. But name calling? seriously? Grow up man. You've offered absolutely nothing to this conversation other than vague critique and insults. Why bother wasting your time posting in a thread that's apparently well below your level of music mastery?

Cheers!
Last edited by TheGroundZero at Mar 22, 2013,
#27
Quote by TheGroundZero


@Hail: I'm still not sure why all the hate toward others? If you can correct someone, fine. But name calling? seriously? Grow up man. You've offered absolutely nothing to this conversation other than vague critique and insults. Why bother wasting your time posting in a thread that's apparently well below your level of music mastery?

Cheers!


lol
modes are a social construct
#28
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor

Playing over a Gm7, C7b9, Fmaj9, Fmaj9; I think G dorian for the ii, C phrygian dominant for the V, & F lydian for the I. This is how I try to practice when I have time, I'm just not at the point where I can consistently apply it in musical situations.


See I'd call this an over-analysis. When you're so thoroughly rooted in a typical harmony, you should think harmonically - where are your leading tones and worthwhile non-chord tones?

Harmony is about change through time, so you should focus on pivot points rather than what you can do with a static harmony.
#29
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
That phrase sounds good to me, I use it sometimes; when I want to throw in a little lead, I'd rather throw in some "coloration" phrases like that & focus on making the notes swing more than thinking about whether or not I should use a G phrygian dominant or G Super Locrian for a G7#5 chord.(and I can usually get away with it sounding alright.)



The phrase sounds fine. What everyone is ragging on is that the method you used to create the phrase is overcomplicated. It has no modal "coloration" in it, it's just a phrase in G major. The same thing will apply to using G Super Locrian etc etc, because there are easier ways to think about the same exact notes, most of them relating to alterations on the chord (think about chord tones) rather than a whole new scale.
#30
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
So, until you try it out, I don't want to hear your opinions.

Another ignorant noob. Congratulations.
#31
Quote by TheGroundZero
Thanks again everyone for chiming in. Like I said, I think it's time to get back to lessons.
I guess what really prompted me to start this thread was trying to understand what chords I have available to me in any given mode. The reason why, is because I've been using modal backing tracks on youtube to practice my lead, and general knowledge of the fretboard. I'd like to make some of my own backing tracks for personal use.

I really enjoy the sound and feel of the Dorian tracks. Therefore the original question I asked.
If I want to make a backing track in G Dorian(for example), shouldn't any chords I use contain only the notes in the Dorian mode? Or should I just look at it as Fmaj or Dm? Or should I just be thinking of it as Gm with a raised 6th? This is where I'm getting lost. All three of these(G Dorian, Fmaj(Ionian), Dm(Aeolian)) all use the same notes. That's why, to me, it made since to use the chords in the example in my OP.

Now my head is really spinning. I'm starting to lose myself now...

Anyway, thanks again to everyone trying to help. The replies here have definitely made me want to get back to lessons due to my lack of knowledge and the amount of dissent between different replies. It's sometimes hard to decipher what's correct and what isn't.

@Hail: I'm still not sure why all the hate toward others? If you can correct someone, fine. But name calling? seriously? Grow up man. You've offered absolutely nothing to this conversation other than vague critique and insults. Why bother wasting your time posting in a thread that's apparently well below your level of music mastery?

Cheers!

OK... Let's not talk about modes yet... Do you know the difference between E minor and G major? Both have the same key signature but they are different things and sound pretty different. That's because of the key center that in G major is G and in E minor is E. Everything resolves to that chord and you can use whatever chords and you are still in that key as long as it resolves to that chord.

So when you are talking about "dorian sound", what you really want to play is minor with major 6th. And D minor with major 6th is closer to D minor (it actually is D minor) than it's to C major even though it has the same notes as C major. It's about the key center. So you are really playing in D minor but you are just playing a major 6th instead of a minor 6th. This is what you could call "dorian". But in most cases you are playing tonal music and not modal music. You are just using accidentals. You can use all the 12 notes and it doesn't change the key.

The most common "dorian" progression is Dm7-G7. But you are really playing in D minor. D is the tonal center *. Everything resolves to a minor chord so it's a minor key. There are two keys - major and minor - because there are two chords that everything can resolve to - minor and major.

(* Not always of course. The key has a lot to do with what was played before and after that progression.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#32
Quote by MaggaraMarine
How are you using modes here? It all fits in G major scale. And it's kind of stupid to say what key it's in if there are no chords in the background, though IMO that was pretty obviously a melody in G major. I don't see how this would be using modes.

And I don't know if that sounded good or not because there's no rhythm or chords.


Why don't you just think "F major, F major, F major, F major"? You are playing in F major all the time. And you are also allowed to use accidentals of course.



I said how I'm using modes: it's short Phrases of Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & Ionian. Are you asking me to break down the intervals?

Well ya, obviously I am thinking F major I am just trying to give it a unique flavor with a different pallet of colors when I play lines; if everyone only stayed in F major over a F major all the time i would get bored. Why not explore something that sounds different.
#33
Quote by mdc
Another ignorant noob. Congratulations.



Ya, I never said I am anything special; that's great you are so awesome and feel the need to tell everyone on the internet: but how does saying try it out then give me your opinion make me a noob your greatness.
#34
Quote by Hail
he doesn't know the difference between keys and scales cause he's a moron MM ignore him



Honestly, from your post's I get the sense you really don't know what youre talking about
Last edited by Sti Eci Tehpor at Mar 25, 2013,
#35
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
I said how I'm using modes: it's short Phrases of Ionian, Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Phrydian, Dorian, & Ionian. Are you asking me to break down the intervals?

Well ya, obviously I am thinking F major I am just trying to give it a unique flavor with a different pallet of colors when I play lines; if everyone only stayed in F major over a F major all the time i would get bored. Why not explore something that sounds different.

You are not using any modes, it's just a melody in G major. What chords do you play behind the melody? That changes its sound a lot. Same melody can be in A minor or C major depending on the chords behind it. The notes in the melody don't matter at all to the key you are in, the chords behind the melody do. Again, all I'm hearing in that melody is G major. I'm not saying it sounds bad but it's not modal. That's all.

So how do you understand modes? That's my question.

And also can you answer to my question: What's the difference between E minor and G major?

And really, don't tell Hail he doesn't know what he's talking about because he does.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#36
Different root note, add C & F# to Eminor and it is the same notes as G major. E minor relative minor to G major.
#37
I am using modes: short Phrases of Ionian(1,2,3,5,1,7,5), Aeolian(1,7b,5,6b,5,4,3b,1), Dorian(1,2,3b,5,6,7b,5,3b), Mixolydian(1,7b,6,5,4,3,2,1), Lydian(1,5,4#,1,2,3,1), Phrydian(1,2b,3b,1,6b,7b,1,6b), Dorian(1,2,3b,5,1,7b,6), & resolves on Ionian(1).

Those are the same intervals for the same notes I used above. They are modes
#38
Here a simplified version of how I use modes here is a random progression for a hypothetical situation: Cmaj7, Cmaj9, Dm7, Dm7, G7, Fmaj7, Em7, Dm7. Here are the modes I would use for phrasing (Cmaj7(C Ionia ),Cmaj9 (C lydian (to add some flavor)), Dm7(D dorian), Dm7(D dorian), G7(G mixo), Fmaj7(F Lydian), Em7(E phrygian), Dm7(D dorian) i
#39
I am at school so I don't know what that sounds like but it is just to show you my general thought process.
#40
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
Different root note, add C & F# to Eminor

both those notes are already found naturally in e minor

i think people's less than pleasant reactions to your posts have significantly more to do with your insistence that what you're saying is correct and that you've said you don't want to hear others' opinions than anything related to the factual inaccuracies you've put forth
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