#1
I'm just starting out in DIY home recording, so bear with me if this is a noobish question.

When I'm recording my guitar parts into my interface, which connects to my computer, I always make sure that I don't make the little red button, which indicates clipping, turn red when recording my dry signal. Then, when I go to apply my amp sims to the dry signal, the input level bar in my DAW goes through the roof. I was just wondering if I could keep that level where it is and be fine without clipping, or should I do something to fix that. And if I am supposed to fix this what should I do? Thanks for helping out a beginner!
#3
Quote by Odirunn
Just turn down your amp sim output.


...or anything else you may have in the signal chain. Any one of the VSTs in your signal chain could be clipping the output...
#5
It's always a good idea to have a quite recording, you can always bring up the volume when you master it anyway.
dynamics baby.
Or you might have to much distortion, sorry I don't know how to work with heavy distortion, since I'm still a noob at recording...
#6
Quote by takachan
It's always a good idea to have a quite recording, you can always bring up the volume when you master it anyway.

Recording quietly and raising the volume is a bad idea. Doing it this way will increase the noise floor.
#7
Quote by roaraudio
Recording quietly and raising the volume is a bad idea. Doing it this way will increase the noise floor.

In the digital world, noise floors aren't anywhere near as big an issue as they used to be.
#8
i always record the dry signal of my guitar pretty quiet and just crank my phones or monitors so i can still hear it, that way when i apply an amp sim the volume doesnt shoot up and start clipping and if it still needs some juice i just throw a saturator on the track and tweak knobs accodringly.
#9
Quote by roaraudio
Recording quietly and raising the volume is a bad idea. Doing it this way will increase the noise floor.

Um...what? I've always been told that you record quietly and raise the volume. TS is using a DAW, so it's perfectly fine to do this.
#10
Some mixed opinions and information in here, feel the need to clarify a few things about resolution and noise floor.


Ok, so back in the days of 16-Bit everybody used to say "record hot, so you have maximum dynamic range" and that advice was followed by pretty much everybody, as it was also the case with older recording mediums. Then 24-Bit resolution came along and people realised you had a huge potential dynamic range now.

What does this mean in relation to recording? It increases the detail you can get in amplitude of the waveform, in a literal sense increasing the number of steps in amplitude that a point on the waveform [a sample] can be. So yeah, you're probably wondering what difference makes... it basically allows a quieter signal to have more steps between it and the noisefloor, so there is more detail in between, and thus it is less likely that the noise floor will be rounded up closer to the level of that sample.

So yes, in one respect you can worry less about recording quite so hot, but there is a difference between recording at a decent level and recording quiet. I think some of you are also confusing the advice of 'mix quiet, then boost in mastering' with 'record hot'. Mixing with the faders low is entirely different to 'recording', because it is a post-production, non-destructive process whereas the tracking is the destructive process where anything you record is the final result, as far as the original waveform... you can't just change some parameters on it, like a plug-in would, and get a different raw signal.


You should not aim to record quiet... afterall, what's the point? You'll still benefit being far from the noise floor if you record towards the upper end of the scale, but I would recommend recording at a level before you reach the amber lights of your interface's metering, or if your interface doesn't have a three-stage colour code system on its metering, that you monitor the input in some way and make sure you have at least 10dB headroom between the clipping point and your average peaks. This allows for any large transients that may slip in on certain points in the track.

As for mixing quiet, that is completely different and the idea behind that is to keep all your faders low enough so your master output isn't in danger of clipping, without any compression or limiting on the output channel strip - so you don't end up applying too much compression to individual tracks in the mix, and instead keep more of the dynamics of the song's structure, and when the mix itself is compressed in the mastering process - these individual elements are only compressed when they need to be, when the rest of the track is also loud and fighting for headroom.
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