#1
Hey, I'm doing a informative presentation on guitar scales in my communications class, and I need someone to look over my outline to make sure i'm not missing anything important. Also, do you think this is too advanced a concept to try to explain to people who don't know anything about guitars? I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this buy any help is appreciated, thanks! Feel free to make suggestions, i'm planning on playing something and explaining the theory behind it, but i'm not sure what I want to play..

Musical Scales on the Guitar Presentation Outline
Purpose Statement: To inform my audience about musical scales using the guitar.
Thesis Statement: Musical scales are used on the guitar to create music.
Introduction: Musical scales are used on many different instruments to create music. I will be focusing on the guitar because it will be much easier to explain the concepts on that instrument. There are many different types of musical scales used to create music; different types of scales are more common in different genres of music.
Transition: We will now discuss what exactly musical scales are.
Body
Main Point 1: Musical scales are made of a series of pitches.
1. Musical scales progress in either a half step or whole step. A step is the term for the space between pitches. Musical scales progress in either a half-step or a whole step. For example an E note and E# note are only a half-step apart while an E note and C note are one whole step apart. On the guitar, every fret is a half-step away from the previous fret.

2. Musical scales are classified by their patterns. An example of a pattern would be two whole steps, than one half steps, than three whole steps, than one half steps.

3. The Keys by which musical scales are named come from the pitch a musical scale starts and ends on. The note a scale starts on is the same as the note that the scale ends on, except the note the scale ends on is 1 octave higher. For example, an E minor pentatonic scale starts and ends on an E note.

Main Point 2: There are many different types of musical scales classified by different types of patterns.
1. Every musical scale is either a major or minor scale. A major scale generally sounds happy while a minor scale generally sounds sad. Most of the time fast songs are in major keys, while ballads are mostly in minor keys. The notes in these scales follow a pattern of whole steps and half-steps. The major scale starts at the key note, than follows the pattern of WWHWWWH. The natural minor scale follows the pattern of WHWWHWW.

2. Chromatic scales are scales that follow a pattern of only half-steps. Pentatonic scales are five note scales that are either major or minor.

3. Pentatonic scales are either major or minor with a key note. For example an E major pentatonic scale is basically an E major scale without the 4th or 7th notes. An E minor pentatonic scale is basically an E minor scale without the 2nd and 6th note.

Main Point 3: Guitar scales are used to create music; different scales are more popular in different genres of music.
1. Guitar scales are used to either construct guitar chords or solos.

2. Guitar scales can be used to improvise, or come up with progressions on the spot.

3. The Pentatonic scale is very popular in rock music, especially the minor pentatonic. For example, Jimi Hendrix’s song, “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” is based on the E minor pentatonic scale. Also, Led Zeppelin’s, “Stairway to Heaven” is based off of the A minor pentatonic scale. Country music is primarily based off of the major scale.

Conclusion: In conclusion, musical scales can be used on the guitar to create different melodies.
#2
Ask this user crazysam_atax_23 to explain to you why you should ignore modes and scales.
#3
Y U no ignore modes and scales?
I'm gonna suffer for the rest of my life

But I will always find a way to survive
#5
I think you should pick a topic that is actually informative. That is, holding value and relevance to your audience. Scales hold none of those things to anybody.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#6
Quote by NothingRocks
This would be interesting if most of this information wasn't false.


Then correct me please.. I made this thread because I noticed that. I'm still a beginner when it comes to theory, and I made this outline 3 months ago :/
#7
Quote by Xiaoxi
I think you should pick a topic that is actually informative. That is, holding value and relevance to your audience. Scales hold none of those things to anybody.

I can't change my topic, and my audience is my class so they share almost no common interests anyway.
#8
Okay, here are some that immediately stand out as wrong.

Main point 1, point 1:

Nope, not all scales progress in just half steps and whole steps. There are a multitude of scales that have intervals that aren't just a half step or whole step away. Harmonic Minor for example goes up a minor third when going from the 6th note to the 7th note.

Main point 1, point 2:

I don't necessarily agree, but whatever.

Main point 2, point 1:

Nope, there are scales other than major and minor. You can look up a list of various musical scales for yourself because there are far too many for me too list. Also, modes.
#9
I like how points 2.1 and 2.2/2.3 are completely contradictory. "All scales are either major or minor. But there are also scales that aren't major or minor." That is just some real good presenting right there.

Quote by Xiaoxi
Scales hold none of those things to anybody.


lol nah
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
I would explain the " 4 chords of awesome progression" its more interesting and people that arent musicians would find it more interesting.
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#11
It'd be cool if we had another subforum so that innocent pitmonkeys needn't read all this musician talk.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#12
Quote by Hydra150
It'd be cool if we had another subforum so that innocent pitmonkeys needn't read all this musician talk.

Oh man, if only.


Ahem.
#14
Quote by sandeater
Musical scales progress in either a half-step or a whole step. For example an E note and E# note are only a half-step apart while an E note and C note are one whole step apart.

Might want to fix that, b, otherwise everyone will be confused.
A major scale generally sounds happy while a minor scale generally sounds sad. Most of the time fast songs are in major keys, while ballads are mostly in minor keys.
Not really, minor keys are far too prominent in metal for start. And plenty of ballads are in major keys.
West Ham United
Last edited by King Donkey at Mar 25, 2013,
#15
Quote by blake1221
Ask this user crazysam_atax_23 to explain to you why you should ignore modes and scales.

Quote by StopReadingThis
Y U no ignore modes and scales?


Thank you, boys, but I won't be ruining TS's parade tonight.


However, a minor correction...
Guitar scales are used to either construct guitar chords or solos.
Actually, chords are constructed based on intervals between the root note and other notes. (Note that the root note is not always the bass note; see inversions [here].)

The Keys by which musical scales are named come from the pitch a musical scale starts and ends on.
Actually, it would be more correct to say that scales are named after a key based upon the intervals of the notes of scale from the tonic. For example, if a scale is the A minor pentatonic scale, then the tonic of it is A. It is, literally, a scale in the key of A minor.