#1
So I'm trying to repaint the body of an old bass that a friend of mine found in his basement. I've never done this, or really any other kind of painting, and have absolutely no idea what I'm doing. I managed to strip all of the paint off and sand it down to the bare wood, and now I guess I need to coat it with primer before I actually paint it? What kind do I use? Everywhere just says, "spray with primer," without any specific kind.
#3
Incorrect. You don't know the state of the old finish until you've already gone through it. Taking it all off, starting from scratch and doing the job properly gives you the best finish possible.

Anyhoo, once sanded down you'll want to use grain filler and sanding sealer first, although some woods don't need filling (e.g. basswood and rock maple). Then use primer if you are going to use an opaque (flat or metallic) colour finish. Bear in mind that some types of finish material (e.g. oils, material, Wudtone) don't require sealer or primer. Your common poly and nitro sprays most certainly do require sealer.
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#4
Quote by MrFlibble
Incorrect. You don't know the state of the old finish until you've already gone through it. Taking it all off, starting from scratch and doing the job properly gives you the best finish possible.

Anyhoo, once sanded down you'll want to use grain filler and sanding sealer first, although some woods don't need filling (e.g. basswood and rock maple). Then use primer if you are going to use an opaque (flat or metallic) colour finish. Bear in mind that some types of finish material (e.g. oils, material, Wudtone) don't require sealer or primer. Your common poly and nitro sprays most certainly do require sealer.


No, not incorrect.
Unless its some old nitro or something, which i can guarantee its not, there is absolutely no need to go to the wood. The polyester finish that is on 95% of production guitars doesnt change, it is pretty much plexi glass. There is no point in sanding off a perfectly good, flat surface, only to RE seal and re prime.
I can guarantee 99% of people cannot get a guitar sealed and as flat as from the factory.
Last edited by Explorerbuilder at Mar 26, 2013,
#5
I heard you should never strip a guitar down to the bare wood and then repaint it because it will ruin the tone of the guitar. I didn't question it, I just believe it. Then I thought; well why do they make guitars with a satin or natural finish?
#6
Quote by Explorerbuilder
No, not incorrect.
Unless its some old nitro or something, which i can guarantee its not, there is absolutely no need to go to the wood. The polyester finish that is on 95% of production guitars doesnt change, it is pretty much plexi glass. There is no point in sanding off a perfectly good, flat surface, only to RE seal and re prime.
I can guarantee 99% of people cannot get a guitar sealed and as flat as from the factory.

And they damn won't get a factory-flat finish if they're working on a surface they stripped down haphazardly; you know it won't have been stripped level.

A finish can only be as good as its most half-arsed stage. If you take off some gloss and expect to spray right over it and end up with a quality finish then you're going to be severely disappointed.
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#7
Quote by MrFlibble
And they damn won't get a factory-flat finish if they're working on a surface they stripped down haphazardly; you know it won't have been stripped level.

A finish can only be as good as its most half-arsed stage. If you take off some gloss and expect to spray right over it and end up with a quality finish then you're going to be severely disappointed.


If you say so man. I have done guitar painting/ work for the past 8 years straight, and can guarantee i have sprayed and resprayed more guitars than most people will ever even handle. And i did it the way i said, and was not disappointed. I was always disappointed by stripping it down. that doubles the work

Aj,
That is good ole tone voodoo. You wont hear a difference.

Satin and natural finishes still have finish on them. Satin is the the sheen. It is still the same thickness on the guitar. Natural just means clear and no stain/ dye.