#1
Hi guys.

Can anyone tell me what key this progression is in; A E G D

And then this; F#m E D A

And maybe how you know that.. :-)

I've been reading about keys but i'm just not sure.

Thanks.
#2
Quote by Keien
Hi guys.

Can anyone tell me what key this progression is in; A E G D


No. It could easily be D, which seems the most obvious choice, where the E is a non-functioning secondary dominant. It could also be A where the G is a bVII.

It could probably be something else as well, but those are the most likely options.

Listen to the song, see where it wants to resolve. That's your key. You don't find the key by counting chords, which is why there are lots of other options. But if I was counting chords I'd look at this in G and realize D - G - A is my 1-4-5 and then figure out what the E is doing, or realize that A D E is my 1-4-5 and figure out what the G is doing.

Notice that the keys of A and D are only one note different.

And then this; F#m E D A


This seems most likely to be A, where it's a very straightforward iv V IV I.

But it could also be F#m where it's a i bVII vVI bIII.

It could also be something else, but those two are by far the most likely.
#3
Quote by Keien
Hi guys.

Can anyone tell me what key this progression is in; A E G D

And then this; F#m E D A

And maybe how you know that.. :-)

I've been reading about keys but i'm just not sure.

Thanks.

Do you know what a cadence is, and what "resolve" means?
#4
Quote by mdc
Do you know what a cadence is, and what "resolve" means?


I'm not sure I know what cadence mean? But resolve I do know, and I would say that the first progression resolves on the D chord. Guess it's in the key of D then?

Quote by HotspurJr
No. It could easily be D, which seems the most obvious choice, where the E is a non-functioning secondary dominant. It could also be A where the G is a bVII.

It could probably be something else as well, but those are the most likely options.

Listen to the song, see where it wants to resolve. That's your key. You don't find the key by counting chords, which is why there are lots of other options. But if I was counting chords I'd look at this in G and realize D - G - A is my 1-4-5 and then figure out what the E is doing, or realize that A D E is my 1-4-5 and figure out what the G is doing.

Notice that the keys of A and D are only one note different.


Thank you, I was thinking kind of like that, but it's kind hard with all those options. The key of D seems right.
#5
If you play all 8 chords, it's clearly the key of A major.

|A E G D | F#m E D A|

This series begins with A. It ends with A. Both E and D are in the key of A. F#m is the relative minor of A. The only curve is the G chord, but with eight chords, it's no big deal to throw in G in lieu of Gdim. I could easily see the first four chords being a chorus and the latter four a verse, for example, in which case I'd say both are in the key of A.

The first four chords standing alone, one might say could be in key of D. Three of four chords are in key of D. Only odd ball is E, when Em is in the key of D. I think, in general, most people would lean towards saying the first four chords are in A because you play A first and thus set the tone, and the only "out of key" chord is the third one played. Whereas, if you are in key of D, you are (1) not starting with D, and (2) the second chord you hear is not even in the key of D, so your ear is not inclined to feel a D major key. Then you end with G to D... Well, hell, maybe it does sound like it all will now resolve to D. I'd have to play it. Play it and see if the last chord (D) feels like "home" or not. Maybe play A - E - G - D - A and then ask yourself if the last change from D to A made it sound MORE like home, or LESS like home.

Note, I am self-taught, so don't rely on me for much.

Ken