#3
I believe it's:
Bass: E2-C4
Alto: F3-D5
Tenor: B2-G4
Soprano: C4-A5
#5
Quote by j777p
I believe it's:
Bass: E2-C4
Alto: F3-D5
Tenor: B2-G4
Soprano: C4-A5

According to wikipedia:
Soprano: C4 – C6
Mezzo-soprano: A3 – A5
Contralto: F3 – F5
Tenor: C3 – C5
Baritone: F2 – F4
Bass: E2 – E4

I dont really think this is accurate, for example its not only a half step between baritone and bass. Baritone is more like g2-g4. And im sure bass isnt supposed to be as high. I know plenty of baritones who are not singers that can go down to D-C2.

Myself im pretty sure i am a low baritone. My lowest note is a C#2 (can do a c when i just woke up) - to a e4 (i can yell up to f#/g4 and on a good day they can sound kinda clear). I really hate my range, and i wish i could hot those high notes with power.
Anyone here got a similar range to me?
Last edited by Usernames sucks at Mar 26, 2013,
#6
If you read more into it it goes on to tell you that there are more than one type of baritone, bass, etc. Some sing lower, higher, with vibrato, without etc. As I see it Bass and Baritone have been blurred throughout history and is more about timbre than vocal range. Also those classifications are from the Harvard Book of Music, other books or teachers will say different.

What kind of singing style do you use?
Last edited by Malchius at Mar 26, 2013,
#7
the ranges given are rough estimates at best and that's not taking into account the bajillion subdivisions between lyric/operatic/dramatic/basso profondo/blah blah blah and so forth so keep that in mind as well

i've always paid more attention to how singers can make notes sound personally, my lowest note is a D2 and i have a pretty good upper register so some people probably wouldn't consider me a "true bass" or whatever but i never sang anything other than that simply because i can project low notes well and i'm not straining to hit them (which equals a much better tone imo), whereas people who technically had a lower range were straining by the time they got to E/F2

i don't know why this is but my speaking voice generally sits below the bass clef so that might be part of it and most people i sang with spoke around the G2-B2 range generally speaking
#8
Quote by j777p
I believe it's:
Bass: E2-C4
Alto: F3-D5
Tenor: B2-G4
Soprano: C4-A5

These are good, safe choral ranges.
Quote by Usernames sucks
According to wikipedia:
Soprano: C4 – C6
Mezzo-soprano: A3 – A5
Contralto: F3 – F5
Tenor: C3 – C5
Baritone: F2 – F4
Bass: E2 – E4

These are pretty extreme and only appropriate for solo/operatic voice parts.

Quote by :-D
the ranges given are rough estimates at best and that's not taking into account the bajillion subdivisions between lyric/operatic/dramatic/basso profondo/blah blah blah and so forth so keep that in mind as well

i've always paid more attention to how singers can make notes sound

This. The most important factor when determining voice type isn't actually range, it's the timbre of the voice. I'm a tenor, but I can't sing very high so I sing baritone in choir.
#9
I found this picture somewhere on the internet, I can't remember where but I saved it and kept it...
Si
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
I found this picture somewhere on the internet, I can't remember where but I saved it and kept it...
They forgot "counter tenor", the politically correct term for men with really high voices....
#11
Quote by Usernames sucks
According to wikipedia:
Myself im pretty sure i am a low baritone. My lowest note is a C#2 (can do a c when i just woke up) - to a e4 (i can yell up to f#/g4 and on a good day they can sound kinda clear). I really hate my range, and i wish i could hot those high notes with power.
Anyone here got a similar range to me?


To be honest I think it's pretty much close to the average. My chest range is also close to yours. I believe I'm some kind of lyrical baritone. If I included every note it would be C#2-A4. Ofc, I can go down to C#2 but it doesn't really sound full, my lowest usable note would be E2. Same for that A4, too much yelling. I wouldn't usually go higher than G4. Of course I don't hate my range, if I use proper technique I can go up to G5 on my good days. Keep in mind that I'm pretty lazy singer and rarely exercise. I think B5/C6 would be a realistic goal if I decided to get serious about it. I'm sure you can do the same.
Last edited by Sethis at Mar 27, 2013,
#12
Quote by Sethis
To be honest I think it's pretty much close to the average. My chest range is also close to yours. I believe I'm some kind of lyrical baritone. If I included every note it would be C#2-A4. Ofc, I can go down to C#2 but it doesn't really sound full, my lowest usable note would be E2. Same for that A4, too much yelling. I wouldn't usually go higher than G4. Of course I don't hate my range, if I use proper technique I can go up to G5 on my good days. Keep in mind that I'm pretty lazy singer and rarely exercise. I think B5/C6 would be a realistic goal if I decided to get serious about it. I'm sure you can do the same.

We are talking falsetto?
#13
Quote by Usernames sucks
We are talking falsetto?

No, if you bridge everything it doesn't really matter. It's just one full voice. Varying degrees of chest and head voice.
#14
Quote by Sethis
No, if you bridge everything it doesn't really matter.


Yeah, it does. Even if you can transition from the modal to the falsetto register without a noticeable break the notes you sing in falsetto will never have the same tonal quality as the same notes produced by someone who can reach the same notes in their modal voice.

Quote by Captaincranky
They forgot "counter tenor", the politically correct term for men with really high voices....


A large number of 'counter tenors' nowadays are actually baritones or basses who chose to develop their falsetto to the point where they can comfortably pass in the vocal range usually reserved for females. Male singers whose voices naturally fall within that range are almost universally the product of accident or disease.
.
#15
Quote by Nietsche
Yeah, it does. Even if you can transition from the modal to the falsetto register without a noticeable break the notes you sing in falsetto will never have the same tonal quality as the same notes produced by someone who can reach the same notes in their modal voice.\

Ok but I'm not talking about falsetto. Actually everyone will sound different on said notes but in the end it's all about style and subjective opinion. In most music, if it sounds good to you it doesn't matter how you will call it. I didn't promise that he would sound exactly like a tenor. He can't and he doesn't need to. He can still get a strong, powerful voice.
Last edited by Sethis at Mar 27, 2013,
#16
Bass is such a weird voice type to categorize, wikipedia says C2-C4, but I span from A#1-D3 and I still sing bass ranged stuff in choir pretty easily. I've also heard that E2 is the base pitch for most bass singers, but as with all ranges it varies.
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#17
COUNTERTENOR
The Countertenor Voice may actually be unfamiliar to those of us not from the classical realm, as many of us would probably only have heard of the 3 main male voices - Tenor, Baritone and Bass.
TENOR
The Tenor Voice is the highest of the main male vocal types that most people would be familiar with, with the typical tenor vocal range lying
BARITONE
The Baritone Voice would transition into middle voice somewhere around the A or B note just below middle C (A3 or B3), and move into head voice somewhere at the D or E note just above middle C (D4 or E4). Also, the baritone tessitura would lie somewhere between the Tenor and the Bass tessituras, and the baritone voice would be strongest in the middle range pitches.
#18
This is bs, I've tried that vocal range thing before, you can make whatever singing voice/pitch you want, I know I can
#19
Quote by skilly1
This is bs, I've tried that vocal range thing before, you can make whatever singing voice/pitch you want, I know I can

Check, you and Mariah Carey. That said, even Roy Orbison "ONLY" had a 6 octave range.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 28, 2013,
#21
Quote by 20Tigers
I found this picture somewhere on the internet, I can't remember where but I saved it and kept it...


nice post, thanks. been wondering this myself too.
#22
The biggest complication is the differentiation between operatic ranges and choral ranges. For instance, an operatic tenor should be able to sing from middle C to high C - two octaves. However, in choral music a so-called "choral tenor" or "pop tenor" isn't usually required to sing quite so high. Especially if you are a second tenor or something, maybe a G or an A is enough a lot of the time.

You'll also find less demanding ranges in study books/method books for younger or developing musicians. Tell a 16 year old boy whose voice has just changed that, in order to be taken seriously as a tenor, he'll need to sing up to a high C, and he'll probably just walk out. Very few men can sing that high even with training, never mind without.

The operatic delineations are quite strict and quite demanding.

Now, even with operatic delineations, the ranges won't change much (if at all, really), but are determined more by the vocal quality or relative strengths within that range. A basso profundo will still be able to sing from low C to middle C, but his strength will be at the very bottom of his range, and he will have a robust and commanding tone in the bottom octave. He might even be able to sing below the low C. At the opposite end, a spinto tenor is a man with a very light characterized voice that is decidedly agile in the top end of the range, and might even be able to get a note or two above the high C. Myself, using the strict operatic terminologies, am a lyric baritone - a baritone whose range extends the regular baritone range of G to G (my highest note is a Bb on a good day, an A if I need it to be reliable), where the strength of my voice is in the upper middle to upper part of my voice.

For the record, falsetto is not counted when defining one's range. Only the natural voice, or the modal voice.

And for the record, two octaves is a decent range. Three is very unusual. Anyone who says they have much more than three octaves is almost guaranteed to be either lying or is simply incorrect (ex. counting falsetto, etc.)

CT
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I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#23
i used to be able to get around 2.5 octaves or so when i was singing consistently back in high school, and now if i try to sing anything around a top treble line F or above my head practically explodes

#24
Yes axemanchris is completely correct. Good post. As far as I know after a point (not sure when) operatic singing stayed entirely in chest voice while before that even baritones were asked to hit much higher notes. Nowadays they just pull high their chest voice. So falsetto or even head voice do not count even though head can be trained to match the timbre of your lower notes.

Just a question though, in opera how do singers determine their lowest note? I mean I think that most people can sing much lower than what their types say they can. For example my range is about D2-A4 in modal. It doesn't really fit anywhere.
Last edited by Sethis at Apr 4, 2013,
#25
Lowest note is determined the same way as the highest note - the note you can actually "sing" without it sounding forced or fake or whatever.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#26
People (i.e. men) love to throw out really low notes as their bottom range, but what they don't realize is that while they hear that awesome low D resonating in their skull, outside of their head it just sounds like rumbling nothingness. Just because you can hit a note doesn't mean you're comfortable singing it.
#27
To be honest in opera that's a real problem. That's because you don't have a mic and every note has to be heard clearly even at the person sitting at the back of the room. In contemporary music you can get away with it. A D2 of a baritone can never be compared to that of a bass though.
Last edited by Sethis at Apr 4, 2013,
#28
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
This. The most important factor when determining voice type isn't actually range, it's the timbre of the voice.


I'm not entirely sure about this. I mean, generally there's a noticeable timbral difference between bass, baritone and tenor voices, but what about someone like Jonas Kaufmann who sings tenor roles but whose voice has frequently been noted for it's baritone-like quality?

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#29
The fact that it's notable when a tenor sings with baritone-like qualities probably tells you something. But yeah, there are obviously exceptions.

My point was that people tend to get obsessed with range when timbre is often as, if not more, important.