#1
Hi there guys

Basically, I'm wanting to be an Apache pilot in the British army air corps. I've researched pay and lots of other stuff about this job. However, what I'd like to know, without all the recruitment bullsh*t, is how likely is that I am actually going to be flying an Apache in combat. I don't really want to be a technician, refueller or whatever unless it's for a short amount of time and means that I will get to be an Apache pilot. I'm an intelligent guy (IQ of 140) and I'm hoping to come out of university with a 1st in PPE. My eyesight and all the other stuff required for flying is there and healthy. TLDR; can I join as an officer in the army air corps and expect to be flying an Apache into combat within 6 months of following my training?
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#2
Confucius says: Your overconfidence will make your chances 7.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
Within 6 months? Unlikely.
you should've joined your local OTC unit who would've been able to arrange a visit to an AAC unit for you as well as give more insight into army officer life.
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#4
If its anything like Canada, we dont have fighter helicopter pilots, but we do have fighter jet pilots (CF-18 hornets)

you have to be the best of the best of the best of the best of the best, to have a chance at being a fighter pilot.

Most get pushed out of the flight program, and they choose what type of pilot you become if you make it, you have little to no say.

also 20/20 necessary, and very good academic standings.


/edit/
my dad works in aviation, and a fellow coworker was telling him when he was young and wanted to be a pilot through rmc (military college), ended up being a maintenance engineer i believe, he made 1 poor landing, and he was cut. A single poor landing and thats all it took, he was no longer suitable for the program.
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Last edited by JimmyBanks6 at Mar 28, 2013,
#6
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#7
Are you....

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#8
You have en IQ of 140 and you want to fly an apache in combat? F*ck, I have to redefine my understanding of intelligence now.
#9
Look at it this way - if you don't join up, you will never achieve your goal. Joining doesn't guarantee it will happen, but not joining will guarantee it won't.

Even if it doesn't happen, signing up could still be the start of a good career. If you're as intelligent & qualified as you say you are, you'll be able to progress through the ranks and who knows how far you could go?

Remember, just because you think that would be a cool job right now doesn't mean you'll have the same feelings about it in 5 or 10 years time. However, in 5 or 10 years time if you don't sign up and give yourself the chance you'll always regret it.
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#10
^ That is a quality post. Ron Swanson approved.


I used to want to be a fighter pilot. I still have some ambition to join the USAF, but not as anything nearly that risky. I'd probably put to use my CSCI degree.
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#11
Quote by falcon1439
(...)can I join as an officer in the army air corps and expect to be flying an Apache into combat within 6 months of following my training?


No.


That's pretty much the same answer for any trade in any army in the world. You don't join as an infantier and then 2 weeks later get sent to the sandbox. You don't join the air force and a month later get a deployment on a ****ing aircraft carrier getting paid to re-enact Top Gun. And no, you don't join the air force and learn how to do everything and on top learn how to fly a ****ing Apache like a boss and **** shit up like the angel of death hovering in the sky. I'm no genius on helicopter flying, but 6 months? nah. Going into combat? Nah.

Sorry to kill your dreams bud, but this isn't WW1 where you can sign up and get into the shit the next day.

I'm not saying don't join. As a matter of fact, do join. But don't be basing yourself on your unrealistic dreams of doing all that and expecting to get sent somewhere within 6 months.
Last edited by metalblaster at Mar 28, 2013,
#12
6 months? No way. As for the plan in general, a small percentage of people actually fly helicopters and they are the best of the best. If you think that you can do it, by all means go for it.
#13
If your military career plan revolves entirely around flying an Apache helicopter and not wanting to do anything else, I would reconsider joining the military.
#14
Go for it. But as everyone else said, they don't let anyone fly a fighter jet. They aren't gonna risk a man and a plane on the second best.

So simply be the best.
#15
Quote by MadClownDisease
If your military career plan revolves entirely around flying an Apache helicopter and not wanting to do anything else, I would reconsider joining the military.

I literally cannot think of a better reason for joining the military than the desire to fly a badass helicopter around like a badass
#16
Quote by captainsnazz
I literally cannot think of a better reason for joining the military than the desire to fly a badass helicopter around like a badass

As noble a reason to join as it may be, it is unfortunately going to lead to a disappointing career of shooting towelheads.
#17
I respect all your opinions (well, maybe not the top banana one ) Basically what I'm getting from the responses is that I have to be the best. And about the guy who swore a lot and had a world war one comment, I'd like to know where you get the sources for that information. I'm not trying to be a dick, I'm just curious about how long it would take me to go from end of training to pilot.
]
Last edited by falcon1439 at Mar 28, 2013,
#18
Quote by falcon1439
I respect all your opinions (well, maybe not the top banana one ) Basically what I'm getting from the responses is that I have to be the best. And about the guy who swore a lot and had a world war one comment, I'd like to know where you get the sources for that information. I'm not trying to be a dick, I'm just curious about how long it would take me to go from end of training to pilot.

How much preparation or research have you done into AOSB? It is unlikely you will score highly at briefing if the only reason you want to join as an officer is to fly an Apache.
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#19
Quote by falcon1439
I respect all your opinions (well, maybe not the top banana one ) Basically what I'm getting from the responses is that I have to be the best. And about the guy who swore a lot and had a world war one comment, I'd like to know where you get the sources for that information. I'm not trying to be a dick, I'm just curious about how long it would take me to go from end of training to pilot.

Just from being in the military. I'm army so I don't know specifics for air force, but you ask any military member of pretty much any country and they'll quickly come to the logical and incredibly shit simple conclusion that there's no way anyone would be able to learn how to fly an Apache in 6 months let alone be combat ready let alone even have the chance to use it in a real combat scenario and not just training. Those are state-of-the-art military killing machines that are worth more than what your entire family's combined salary over several lifetimes, and they're incredibly complex to use and require a ridiculous amount of training. They're not just gonna take your word when you say you'll pay attention and be careful. You have to prove yourself to them.

If that's what you want to do man, ****ing go for it. Seriously, anything is possible. If you really want to do that, then do it. Give it your all and make it priority number one.
#20
Quote by falcon1439
Hi there guys

Basically, I'm wanting to be an Apache pilot in the British army air corps. I've researched pay and lots of other stuff about this job. However, what I'd like to know, without all the recruitment bullsh*t, is how likely is that I am actually going to be flying an Apache in combat. I don't really want to be a technician, refueller or whatever unless it's for a short amount of time and means that I will get to be an Apache pilot. I'm an intelligent guy (IQ of 140) and I'm hoping to come out of university with a 1st in PPE. My eyesight and all the other stuff required for flying is there and healthy. TLDR; can I join as an officer in the army air corps and expect to be flying an Apache into combat within 6 months of following my training?


No.

Quote by metalblaster
Just from being in the military. I'm army so I don't know specifics for air force, but you ask any military member of pretty much any country and they'll quickly come to the logical and incredibly shit simple conclusion that there's no way anyone would be able to learn how to fly an Apache in 6 months let alone be combat ready let alone even have the chance to use it in a real combat scenario and not just training. Those are state-of-the-art military killing machines that are worth more than what your entire family's combined salary over several lifetimes, and they're incredibly complex to use and require a ridiculous amount of training. They're not just gonna take your word when you say you'll pay attention and be careful. You have to prove yourself to them.

If that's what you want to do man, ****ing go for it. Seriously, anything is possible. If you really want to do that, then do it. Give it your all and make it priority number one.


He asked if he's likely to see combat within 6 months of finishing training.

I'm a Royal Navy aircraft engineer. Our pilots tend to spend almost a year training, spend a hell of a long time flying around the UK getting their hours up, doing continuation training etc. They then do carrier operations on non-combat deployments, they also go abroad (mostly to Europe or Norway) and again do their continuation training.

From completing training to then actually going to Afghanistan, it's probably a good 24 months.

EDIT: 14 months even
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Last edited by Junglie at Mar 28, 2013,
#21
Quote by Junglie



He asked if he's likely to see combat within 6 months of finishing training.

I'm a Royal Navy aircraft engineer. Our pilots tend to spend almost a year training, spend a hell of a long time flying around the UK getting their hours up, doing continuation training etc. They then do carrier operations on non-combat deployments, they also go abroad (mostly to Europe or Norway) and again do their continuation training.

From completing training to then actually going to Afghanistan, it's probably a good 24 months.

EDIT: 14 months even

There you have it. That's probably a more accurate pinpoint right there.

6 months was just way out of the question though.
#23
Apache pilots do good work, always needed. You'd have high job satisfaction, IMHO.
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#24
Quote by Junglie
No.


He asked if he's likely to see combat within 6 months of finishing training.

I'm a Royal Navy aircraft engineer. Our pilots tend to spend almost a year training, spend a hell of a long time flying around the UK getting their hours up, doing continuation training etc. They then do carrier operations on non-combat deployments, they also go abroad (mostly to Europe or Norway) and again do their continuation training.

From completing training to then actually going to Afghanistan, it's probably a good 24 months.

EDIT: 14 months even



I take it I'll be continually assessed during that 14 months? I'm don't care about the continuation training, as long as I'm flying an Apache. It's always been my dream. Does anyone know the pass rate for the course by the way?
]
#27
I don't know if you can get to flying those in 6 months, but if you really want it, you shouldn't mind waiting. Just go for it and hope for the best. At least you've got a shot at doing something you want.
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#29
If you want to go military you definitely need to broaden your range of acceptable jobs. Wanting to be a pilot is a great goal and one you should go for if you really want to but you should also be prepared to make the best of anything you end up as. I didn't get my first job choice but I really like what I do so far in my Air Force career.
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#30
Quote by falcon1439
I take it I'll be continually assessed during that 14 months? I'm don't care about the continuation training, as long as I'm flying an Apache. It's always been my dream. Does anyone know the pass rate for the course by the way?

No guarantee you'll get an Apache. You're definitely a LOT more likely to get something like the Lynx Mk. 7. Apache is very, very competitive from both new joiners and people already in the military.

Quote by Dreadnought
Probably high.

On my particular unit it varies from course to course but generally around 72% of pilots pass with their original course, and about another 10% pass on the next course after being back-classed.
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Last edited by Junglie at Mar 29, 2013,
#31
My guess is that a shit load of people want this job and there is a hefty waiting list for a lot of jobs in the army.

Plus 6 months is not going to happen. For a start your basic training at sandhurst is 48 weeks long as it actually pretty hard. Then i'm guessing the actual trade course is pretty long and the army is least inefficient place on the planet so you will probably get months of just sitting around watching Jeremy Kyle.

So basically if you're willing to work hard for it and want it then go for it. I'm almost at the 2 year point in the army and I have just finished my initial training and still have like 3-4 months of courses to do at my unit before I'm even able to do my job properly.
#32
Quote by Greenie_777
My guess is that a shit load of people want this job and there is a hefty waiting list for a lot of jobs in the army.

Plus 6 months is not going to happen. For a start your basic training at sandhurst is 48 weeks long as it actually pretty hard. Then i'm guessing the actual trade course is pretty long and the army is least inefficient place on the planet so you will probably get months of just sitting around watching Jeremy Kyle.

So basically if you're willing to work hard for it and want it then go for it. I'm almost at the 2 year point in the army and I have just finished my initial training and still have like 3-4 months of courses to do at my unit before I'm even able to do my job properly.


Just for the record, once again, he's asking if it's possible to 6 months AFTER HIS TRAINING. Not 6 months after joining, not 6 months from walking into the AFCO, 6 months after his training.

It depends entirely on the job as well. Example, I have friends that joined up and within 4 months of qualifying as an engineer were out in Iraq, others were in Afghan within 6. I, however, have bigger and better things on the horizon so I'm not able to go
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#33
Godspeed to you, fellow future soldier.

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#34
Quote by falcon1439
I take it I'll be continually assessed during that 14 months? I'm don't care about the continuation training, as long as I'm flying an Apache. It's always been my dream. Does anyone know the pass rate for the course by the way?

I'm sure there's a whole host of tests to take, or in our country we call them ''courses'' or ''courseloads'' that you have to pass.

Hopefully if you get in and all goes well, you can do all your training continuously and get it all done without wasting too much time. I know it's not really comparable, maybe not precisely relevant, but my buddy spent about 18 months just preparing to go to Afghanistan. That's 18 months just doing the training and courses to go there, not including his 3 months ''work-up'' training as they call it. He was infantry though, completely different. Just don't be surprised if takes longer to complete all your quals. I'm saying this because it's a very common thing here for quals to take a long time because of the way our system works. The object during training is to be able to switch on lightning fast when you have to go back to training and you need to have patience but at the same time maintain and hone your focus in what you're trying to accomplish.
#35
Quote by metalblaster
I'm sure there's a whole host of tests to take, or in our country we call them ''courses'' or ''courseloads'' that you have to pass.

He was infantry though, completely different. Just don't be surprised if takes longer to complete all your quals. I'm saying this because it's a very common thing here for quals to take a long time because of the way our system works.


They're called courses here too At least for additional qualifications. E.g. Myself doing an aircraft movements driver course. Basic training is called phase 1, and trade training is delegated into names like Phase 2, Phase 2A, Phase 2B, Phase 3 etc. Depending on the branch.

But I agree with what you say. I know one pilot I was on a course with who'd been in for 5 years and not officially passed his training, despite completing the course. I didn't care about it though so didn't listen.
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Last edited by Junglie at Mar 30, 2013,
#36
One of my friends wanted to fly so he took flying lessons. It was expensive, but he eventually got his pilots license and occassionally charters a plane to take his gf on day trips halfway across the country.

Just saying that you don't have to be in the military to learn how to fly.
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