#1
Table of Contents

Post 1: How does your pedal want to be powered?
-Batteries
-Dedicated Power Plug
-AC Adapters
-Daisy Chains
-Isolated Power Supplies

Post 2: How to find your correct Power Specfications
-Summary of Specifications
-Recap (TL/DR)

*************************************************************

Batteries





Most consumer grade guitar pedals will be made to run off a single 9V batter, some designs (like a Zvex SHO) will last a long time on a battery, while some pedals (like a Boss DD-7) will suck a battery dead.

Some pedals like effects processors may take different batteries (like AA's or C size) or some pedals may not accept batteries (my moog pedals have to be run via an AC Adapter) or have a built in power supply (my mutron pedals all have a dedicated power cable wired into it).

Rechargeable batteries don't tend to work the best, they seem to have considerably less life than high dollar batteries. I still use rechargeable 9V's in certain pedals with very little current draw, they seem to last 3 or 4 months instead of 6 or 8 months and I can live with that.

My wah pedal last quite a while on a battery so i will just keep a couple extra 9V's around and i end up changing it every 6 months or so. Most of my other pedals i tend to run off wall-warts or more advanced power supplies.


Dedicated Power Cables





These pedals usually don't come with battery capability or have any AC adapter option, so you just use the native plug to power the pedal.

This option is generally associated with higher quality devices (or really old devices). There is multiple reasons for doing this (like designing your own cleaner power supply or running the opamps at higher voltages for more headroom).

My pedalboard includes a small, slim power strip to facilitate a couple of these kinda pedals. As i mentioned before, my old mutron stuff is like this but so is old EHX stuff and my univibe clone has a dedicated plug as well.


AC Adapters (or Wall-Warts)





AC Adapters are a very popular choice with contemporary pedal design mainly because it allows you to run off much more economical electricity from the wall. The guitar pedal is equipped with a 'Barrel Plug' of a particular size which connects with the cord from the AC adapter.



Most manufacturers sell specific power supplies to power their own pedals (with particular voltage values and barrel designs) but most standard guitar pedals have conformed with Boss Specification:

-2.1mm Negative Center Barrel
-9V DC output
-200ma to 500mA current capacity

Some pedals need more current draw capability or higher voltages, they may even have a different polarity or barrel design. See below for finding the appropriate power supply for your pedal.


Daisy Chains


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Any AC Adapter can be turned into a 'Daisy Chain' with an adapter that has multiple barrels on the cord. Some Daisy Chains don't have an adapter and the multiple barrels are hardwired to the Wall-Wart, usually these types of Daisy Chains provide some extra mA to power extra pedals (like 1.5 Amps instead of 250 milli amps).

As best as I can tell a Daisy Chain just hooks all the pedal's up in parallel, so a Daisy Chain works the best when all your pedals share the same power requirements. Certain hums or sounds can develop when particular pedals are run together in a Daisy Chain, and I have heard plenty of times to use separate Daisy Chains for effects in front of the amp and effects in the amp's Effects Loop.

If all of your pedals don't share the same power requirements then certain Polarity Inverters and Power Adapters can be attached to the Daisy Chain to possibly power your pedal. If more versatility and less noise is required then an Isolated Power Supply may be preferred.


Isolated Power Supplies


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Many manufacturers offer higher quality power options usually referred to as Power Bricks or DC Bricks. Usually these devices provide more output slots, more current draw capacity, and more voltage options than a standard Daisy Chain.

The Power Bricks usually isolate each of the power outputs, which works almost like each output is it's own Wal-Wart. This eliminates the opportunity for ground loops and enables quieter operation. Some Bricks also provide some power filtering and surge protection as well. (Just because the power supply is in a 'Brick' form does not necessarily mean it has isolated outputs, for example the Dunlop DC Brick is not isolated but the Voodoo Labs PP2+ is).

Since each power output is isolated then you can run different outputs at different voltages or even have a couple of AC outputs on your power supply. These are nice options to have and they are what you need to consider when buying a power supply. List your pedals needs and be sure the Power Brick you are looking at can provide for all your needs.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Apr 4, 2013,
#2
Summary of Specifications

Pedal power supply questions come up often, generally of the form: “Does this power supply work for this pedal”. This is thread is for all of you out there that want to answer the question for themselves. It’s really not too complicated

This is a pretty standard American power supply (PS).




There are critical bits of info that you should pay attention to




The electrical input the PS is expecting is circled in blue. In general this is not important, if you are in the US then most likely all the power supplies will expect inputs of ~120V AC 60 Hz. Other countries may run 220V AC out the wall, but whatever country you are from just make sure it is compliant with the country you are using it in. This is rarely an issue though (unless you travel a bunch).

The electrical output of the PS is what you should really spend your attention on, you'll see 3 values circled in red:

Voltage: measured in Volts (V) is a measure of electric potential (i am not going into what 'electrical potential' is in this thread). You'll want the PS’s output to match the input the pedal is expecting (a 9V pedal wants a 9V output PS).

Some pedals can work off of higher voltages, for example the Fulltone Full-Drive 2 Mosfet can be sufficiently operated from 9V to 18V:

Quote by Fulltone Manual
DC power jack: This unit will work with most guitar effects 9 to 18 Volt DC adapters that offer the standard 2.1mm x 5.5mm Barrel
jack...please note the adapter MUST HAVE the Negative (-) going to the Center pin to operate with this pedal!


You can provide less than nominal voltage to any pedal. Some artists prefer 'sagging' the input voltage to an effect pedal, I had a couple of friends who'd run very dull batteries with their DS-1's. Some power supplies like the Voodoo Labs Pedal Power + 2 provide power outputs than can be 'sagged' down to 4V or 5V. This overall has the effect of lowering the headroom of the pedal's components.

Current (Type): This will be either Alternating Current (AC) or Direct Current (DC). Most pedals you will run across will require DC, but there are pedals out there that do require AC.

Current (Amount): This is the actual amount of electrons a PS can provide to power pedals. The max current draw is measured in Amps (A) or milli-Amps (mA) (1000 mA are in 1 A). You will need a PS that can provide at least as much current as a pedal requires.

For example: a pedal may require 250 mA, the PS must provide at least 250 mA output. A PS that can provide 500 mA or even 1A is still a perfectly acceptable PS. A PS that can only provide 150 mA won't be able to power the pedal adequately.

There is also one more parameter to pay attention to: polarity. This is the odd symbol circled in green.

Polarity: I won't get technical on this. You will want to match the polarity, make sure the PS and the pedal have the same symbol. Both symbols have a name:



Some call it positive centered or negative centered as well.


There is one more factor to consider, and that would be the barrel geometry. The PS’s barrel has to match the pedals input. Most use pretty standard Boss PSA-120 style barrels, but there are a number of different flavors out there. I generally just try to stay away from odd shaped barrels because I don't like keeping a large number of power supplies with different barrels or barrel adapters around.


RECAP - TL/DR:

-The PS should accept local electrical input (if not the plug is usually shaped funny anyway so it won't fit)

-Make sure the PS's Voltage Output and the pedal's Voltage Input match

-Make sure the PS provides the correct type of current (AC or DC)

-Make sure the PS can provide enough current. You'll want the PS's mA number to be bigger than the pedal's mA number.

-The PS’s polarity symbol should match the pedal's polarity symbol.

-Make sure the barrel of the PS is compatible with the input of the pedal.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Apr 4, 2013,
#3
I don't see any circles, blue, red or green?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 28, 2013,
#4
Quote by Arby911
I don't see any circles, blue or red?


hmm. i do. i had to make the circles very thin so they wouldn't obscure the numbers. are you looking on a smaller screen?

i might need to redo the graphics if it is hard to see.

edit: do you see the lines leading to the numbers? they are big and thick.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Mar 28, 2013,
#5
Quote by Arby911
I don't see any circles, blue, red or green?

Your eyes are old.



No problem, Gumbi. It always takes a second pair of eyes to find the little stuff.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
Last edited by tubetime86 at Mar 28, 2013,
#6
Quote by tubetime86
Your eyes are old.



Come see me whippersnapper, I'll show you a couple of black circles....in the mirror, when you look after you wake up!!





Quote by gumbilicious
hmm. i do. i had to make the circles very thin so they wouldn't obscure the numbers. are you looking on a smaller screen?

i might need to redo the graphics if it is hard to see.

edit: do you see the lines leading to the numbers? they are big and thick.



No, I don't see any graphics at all, but the picture itself is very clear. I run dual 21" monitors here, and have zoomed it up so I don't think that's the problem?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 28, 2013,
#7
Quote by Arby911
Come see me whippersnapper, I'll show you a couple of black circles....in the mirror, when you look after you wake up!!





Well played. I'm sure you would. I'm good at ducking punches, but that only works for the first couple.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#8
Nice work gumbi

Only thing I'd maybe change is instead of:

"Some pedals can work off of higher voltages or lower voltages, unless you know otherwise I recommend matching the voltages."

maybe put

"Some pedals can work off of higher voltages or lower voltages, unless you know otherwise match the voltages so you don't kill your pedal."

Just to keep yourself right.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Quote by tubetime86


Well played. I'm sure you would. I'm good at ducking punches, but that only works for the first couple.


I doubt it, several years ago I figured out that I wasn't as tough as I used to be, now I'm almost certain I was never as tough as I thought I was...

I am confused over the graphics not showing up though? Can't be a firewall issue, as the picture shows up fine?

Odd...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
Nice work gumbi

Only thing I'd maybe change is instead of:

"Some pedals can work off of higher voltages or lower voltages, unless you know otherwise I recommend matching the voltages."

maybe put

"Some pedals can work off of higher voltages or lower voltages, unless you know otherwise match the voltages so you don't kill your pedal."

Just to keep yourself right.


yeah, a little more explanation would prob help. i'll give an example. the fulltone full-drove 2 mosfet can run from 9V to 18V.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#11
Quote by tubetime86


Well played. I'm sure you would. I'm good at ducking punches, but that only works for the first couple.


i cover up and let them punch themselves tired, then i start my very efficient ground and pound
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#12
Also you can supply power for as many pedals as you need provided you have enough mA's, 2000 mA+ is good
Last edited by Tempoe at Mar 28, 2013,
#13
alright guys, i revamped the voltage section

how about this:

Voltage: measured in Volts (V) is a measure of electric potential (whatever that means ). You'll want the PS’s output to match the input the pedal is expecting (a 9V pedal wants a 9V output PS).

Some pedals can work off of higher voltages, for example the Fulltone Full-Drive 2 Mosfet can be sufficiently operated from 9V to 18V:

DC power jack: This unit will work with most guitar effects 9 to 18 Volt DC adapters that offer the standard 2.1mm x 5.5mm Barrel
jack...please note the adapter MUST HAVE the Negative (-) going to the Center pin to operate with this pedal!

You can provide less than nominal voltage to any pedal. Some artists prefer 'sagging' the input voltage to an effect pedal, I had a couple of friends who'd run very dull batteries with their DS-1's. Some power supplies like the Voodoo Labs Pedal Power + 2 provide power outputs than can be 'sagged' down to 4V or 5V. This overall has the effect of lowering the headroom of the pedal's components.


Quote by Tempoe
Also you can supply power for as many pedals as you need provided you have enough mA's, 2000 mA+ is good


alright guys, should we get into daisy chained and power brick PS's too? i might need a little help to make it comprehensive.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Mar 28, 2013,
#14
Great thread.

I need to point out your example of a fixed 9v supply for pedals is only true when the power supply is regulated. Regulated means no matter how much current your pedal board pulls from the power supply (up to the power supply's rated current output) the output volts will stay tight around 9v. When buying power supplies for your pedals, make sure they are regulated.

There are also the cheap wall worts which are unregulated. That means the output voltage is not controlled to a tight 9v output. A 9v unregulated wall wort is only at 9v output when the power supply is supplying its rated current. If the pedal board pulls little current, like you have a 1000ma wall wort and you only have one pedal that needs 100ma, then the output volts rise, could be up to 12 v, possibly more. These are cheaper than regulated supplies, but the cost saving is false economy. Some pedals don't like being over volted and do funny things, some pedals just die at 12v (bye bye pedal), some pedals are fine. Never take the chance.

Always go for regulated.
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#15
Electrical potential is the same as potential energy in mechanical dynamics. It means its potential to do work. Just like a ball sitting on a ledge, it's potential to produce kinetic energy (work) is a function of its weight and height off the ground.
Similarly, an electrical source has a potential to do work. ie heating up a resistor, driving a motor etc. The flow of current is the work. So logically it's potential to source current is proportional to how how much charge there is (voltage) as described by ohm's law. Higher voltage into the same resistor will produce more current => more work => higher electrical potential being converted into work.
It's really that simple.
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#17
Quote by gumbilicious
alright guys, i revamped the voltage section

how about this:

Voltage: measured in Volts (V) is a measure of electric potential (whatever that means ). You'll want the PS’s output to match the input the pedal is expecting (a 9V pedal wants a 9V output PS).

Some pedals can work off of higher voltages, for example the Fulltone Full-Drive 2 Mosfet can be sufficiently operated from 9V to 18V:


You can provide less than nominal voltage to any pedal. Some artists prefer 'sagging' the input voltage to an effect pedal, I had a couple of friends who'd run very dull batteries with their DS-1's. Some power supplies like the Voodoo Labs Pedal Power + 2 provide power outputs than can be 'sagged' down to 4V or 5V. This overall has the effect of lowering the headroom of the pedal's components.



alright guys, should we get into daisy chained and power brick PS's too? i might need a little help to make it comprehensive.


nice work Cath and guys like that will know more about it than me, though, so listen to them.

As usual the problem is getting the proper information across without making it too long... but also not making it too short that you're telling people stuff that's wrong. EDIT: maybe a "TL;DNR" bit at the end just summarising exactly what needs to be matched etc. to make sure the pedals work- the voltage, current, polarity and that type of stuff). Or maybe you could use spoiler tags that people can expand on the more in-depth stuff.

I think going into isolated versus unisolated would be a good idea, too, but again other people here know more than I do on that...
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 29, 2013,
#18
Quote by Cathbard
Electrical potential is the same as potential energy in mechanical dynamics. It means its potential to do work. Just like a ball sitting on a ledge, it's potential to produce kinetic energy (work) is a function of its weight and height off the ground.
Similarly, an electrical source has a potential to do work. ie heating up a resistor, driving a motor etc. The flow of current is the work. So logically it's potential to source current is proportional to how how much charge there is (voltage) as described by ohm's law. Higher voltage into the same resistor will produce more current => more work => higher electrical potential being converted into work.
It's really that simple.


I've always used the water analogy when explaining volts and amps.

Imagine electricity as water flowing through a pipe. Volts is how much pressure the water has, Amps is how many gallons per minute are flowing. A high pressure (voltage) low volume (amp) supply and a low pressure but high volume supply can have the same wattage, but are very different things.

What, I didn't mention wattage?

Well then, Wattage is a mathematical formula presented by (unsurprisingly) James Watt as a method of describing the ability to do work, using a couple of variables and something about a horse and a steam engine... (I then go into a brief history of the watt, which I'll omit here...)

Watts in this instance is simple, Volts x Amps = Watts.

Thus 1000V x 1A = 1000W

or

115V x 8.7A = 1000W (or 5V and 200A etc etc...)


* Note that this was not for you, I know you already know the material above, it was just an addition to the discussion.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#19
Quote by Phoenix V
Always go for regulated.


yes, agreed. unregulated supplies are not useful for our purposes.

Quote by Cathbard
Electrical potential is the same as potential energy in mechanical dynamics. It means its potential to do work. Just like a ball sitting on a ledge, it's potential to produce kinetic energy (work) is a function of its weight and height off the ground.
Similarly, an electrical source has a potential to do work. ie heating up a resistor, driving a motor etc. The flow of current is the work. So logically it's potential to source current is proportional to how how much charge there is (voltage) as described by ohm's law. Higher voltage into the same resistor will produce more current => more work => higher electrical potential being converted into work.
It's really that simple.


i was trying to figure out what this was in response to... then i remembered that remark i left in the article (electrical potential... whatever that is), it was supposed to be a tongue-in-cheek way of saying "i am not going into this, this is about powering pedals instead of discussing basic electricity"

that is actually a great description (we had to calculate it using point charges and some annoying formula). at some time a Basics of Electricity may be needed, it would def help if you want to understand stuff like this better.
Quote by Dave_Mc
\EDIT: maybe a "TL;DNR" bit at the end just summarising exactly what needs to be matched etc. to make sure the pedals work- the voltage, current, polarity and that type of stuff). Or maybe you could use spoiler tags that people can expand on the more in-depth stuff.


there is a TL/DR at the end. complete with highlighting of the 'juicy bits'

Quote by Arby911
I've always used the water analogy when explaining volts and amps.


i like using the water analogy too, it is great for getting the whole idea across without too much detail. if you really want to start focusing in on the details though, then the water analogy can get dangerous.

for example, i used to always explain voltage as the 'pressure' (for pipes) or 'slope' (for river) of the water. but someone jumped my shit one day saying that the more proper explanation for voltage is a 'difference in pressure between two points in the pipe/circuit'.

i had a few other things off as well that he pointed out, either way it is a great analogy. i like how you use the 'pipe' version, that version actually works with a A/C
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#20
Gumbi- great information.

Maybe you should touch on the daisy chain vs isolated?

symptoms if you are near current limit ? (noise?

how to hook them up- highest draw pedals closest to the source.




And I can see the circles.
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
See, it's important that people clarify when they say "metal", because I pretty much always assume they are a Cannibal Corpse fanboi.
#21
Quote by gumbilicious


for example, i used to always explain voltage as the 'pressure' (for pipes) or 'slope' (for river) of the water. but someone jumped my shit one day saying that the more proper explanation for voltage is a 'difference in pressure between two points in the pipe/circuit'.



Didja tell him to piss off, since that's EXACTLY what 'pressure' in a hydraulic (water) system is as well and when we say pressure it's commonly accepted that we mean 'pressure differential'?

IMNSHO, anyone that picks apart your analogies (assuming they are 'in the ballpark' for what you're discussing) should be drawn and quartered, since they are generally doing it as a "Look at how smart I am" moment...

At least that's why I do it!!


Quote by R45VT



And I can see the circles.


I think you pricks are gaslighting me!!


I've attached a screenshot, they simply aren't there for me?
Attachments:
PS Screenshot 2.png
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 29, 2013,
#22
Quote by Arby911
Didja tell him to piss off, since that's EXACTLY what 'pressure' in a hydraulic (water) system is as well and when we say pressure it's commonly accepted that we mean 'pressure differential'?

IMNSHO, anyone that picks apart your analogies (assuming they are 'in the ballpark' for what you're discussing) should be drawn and quartered, since they are generally doing it as a "Look at how smart I am" moment...

At least that's why I do it!!


it was actually a pretty important observation for me. granted me some insight into what is going on, understand the lagrangian and gauge invariance better after that.

it was actually a quite enlightening moment for me.


Quote by Arby911
I think you pricks are gaslighting me!!


I've attached a screenshot, they simply aren't there for me?


there should be another pic right below that one that is just the wall wart (the power cord is cut off) and there are a number of lines, circles and words on it in different colors.

edit: this is the pic here



do you see this?
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Mar 29, 2013,
#23
Quote by Arby911



I think you pricks are gaslighting me!!


I've attached a screenshot, they simply aren't there for me?


What outdated computer are you using? Is there some sort of witchcraft involved?
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
See, it's important that people clarify when they say "metal", because I pretty much always assume they are a Cannibal Corpse fanboi.
#24
Quote by gumbilicious


there should be another pic right below that one that is just the wall wart (the power cord is cut off) and there are a number of lines, circles and words on it in different colors.

edit: this is the pic here



do you see this?


Ok, now I'm sorted. No, I can't see that one, but it's because dropbox etc. is firewalled out from here. I can get around it but it's a PITA so I don't bother most times. I had believed you were talking about the picture I screen captured, it's all good!!

As to the rest, yeah - the potentials aren't observable blah blah blah...physics FTW!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 29, 2013,
#25
Quote by gumbilicious

there is a TL/DR at the end. complete with highlighting of the 'juicy bits


woops

I knew something made me think of that. turns out it was that i read it in the article

i can see the circles fine too, fwiw
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#26
Quote by Arby911
Ok, now I'm sorted. No, I can't see that one, but it's because dropbox etc. is firewalled out from here. I can get around it but it's a PITA so I don't bother most times. I had believed you were talking about the picture I screen captured, it's all good!!

As to the rest, yeah - the potentials aren't observable blah blah blah...physics FTW!


i was starting to wonder if it was something with dropbox.

and yup to physics stuff. that was a pretty big insight to me at the time

@dave
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#27
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#28
On a roll Gumbi?
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#29
Quote by ragingkitty
On a roll Gumbi?


i have a handful more.

alright, included some info about different methods to power your pedals, restructured the thread and added a TOC.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Apr 3, 2013,
#30
just took a quick skim at the first few posts since you said you'd updated it

Looking good, but the dunlop dc brick isn't isolated, fwiw. It'd be worth pointing that out since i'm sure dunlop sells a shitload of those based on the fact that a lot of people think they're isolated
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#31
Quote by Dave_Mc
just took a quick skim at the first few posts since you said you'd updated it

Looking good, but the dunlop dc brick isn't isolated, fwiw. It'd be worth pointing that out since i'm sure dunlop sells a shitload of those based on the fact that a lot of people think they're isolated


i didn't want to look like a Voodoo Labs Fanboy, i really like their stuff. didn't know the DC Brick wasn't isolated.

thx dave.

edit: i even included another blurb on how all Bricks aren't isolated. great input dave!
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Apr 4, 2013,
#32
no problem gumbi

Better check with the more electronically-inclined people on here to check what I told you is right, though
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#33
Quote by Dave_Mc
no problem gumbi

Better check with the more electronically-inclined people on here to check what I told you is right, though


well when i paid more attention it looks like it uses a wall wart to get 18V from the wall, it is most likely not isolated in that case and just daisy chained instead. i never noticed it before.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#34
yeah i've heard it described as a glorified daisy chain
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?