#1
I have to do a presentation for my class tomorrow, I just have to teach a musical idea- any musical idea, from the basics of scales to how a guitar works to whatever.

What do you guys think I should teach?? My classmates are fellow musicians so we have our basics down- basic scales, intervals, chord construction, notation and stuff.

I was thinking about polyrhythms.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#2
Sure, why not?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Dynamics and their effectiveness in the overall mood of a piece of music.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#5
Polyrhythms is a big area, but should be fun to teach! Other ideas: modes, improvisation, the history of a style you're into etc. The list could be endless
#6
Quote by supersac
teach the chord functions?
thats useful and someting not mentioned in the op


What do you mean by chord function? Like how they relate to the movement of the piece, like a V-I or something?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#7
How much time do you have to do it? Some things could be a little hard to explain if you weren't supposed to take very long. I'd do something interesting but that you understand really well (as in there's no fuzzy spots, etc).
Or you could teach about time signatures in general (not the superbasic 'top # means this and bottom # means this. I mean more of the dynamics of them, like why different time signatures can sound so much different, why even times are usually more melodically pleasing to the ear then odd times, and so on), if that hasn't been taught yet. I think it would probably be easier to explain in less time then polyrhythms (unless you're supposed to take a long-ish time, then by all means go crazy, lol). Also if the stuff I mentioned about time signatures hasn't been taught polyrhythms might be kind of a jump ahead for some of the people you're presenting to.
#8
Quote by TDKshorty
What do you mean by chord function? Like how they relate to the movement of the piece, like a V-I or something?



yeah like tonic I
dominant the V and vii
and predominant ii and IV
the rest of them
a bit on cadences
etc.

it seems like something that should be easy
#10
Quote by :-D
modes

+1


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#11
lol
It just has to be like a 3 minute presentation. I guess I'm going to go with polyrhythms.
If I didn't already have a partner I think I would change my subject to something less finite, like I like to call "musical meditation" or something with a more spiritual side ha.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#12
something I always ask blues players...why does the first change in a blues progression almost always go to the IV chord..?? why not a II or a VI chord...? beyond the typical response..it sounds good..
#14
Quote by jrenkert
I like that ^ question. So what is your answer?



remember...the blues started as a vocal form..sung by slaves / workers in the field..it was a call and respond form..so the natural vocal instinct to the IV chord was..well ..natural...you can hear many vocal variations that just go from the I to IV and have no resolution .. it was when this music began being adapted to instruments - piano/horns/banjo/harmonica/guitar..that the form began to have a complete 12 bar form with the V chord

listen to the very early vocal forms ... the energy/feeling raw emotion in the voice .. what else could it be called but the blues...
#15
To debate history I'd say that many "elements" of the blues were certainly derived from african music and from field laborers and their music, however the genre itself didn't start until the early 20th-late 19th century. To say blues developed independent/without instruments is misleading.

As to the IV chord...that can also be explained theoretically. I, IV, V are the most important and tonicising (made up word) chords and the easiest to build off of. Plenty of songs only use these chords. Music, admittedly, gets more interesting with additional chords, but, for the purpose of 12 bar blues, are mainly just passing tones. I guess what I am saying is that a IV chord is just a logical place to go to in construction of a phrase and borrowing from your thought of field chants where there wasnt any written music and seldom any accompaniment it would be an easy chord to find without instrumentation and thus a logical place to proceed to

These were just quick thoughts on the subject
#16
It's also important to note that a I could also be written as V/IV and therefore function as a secondary dominant to the IV chord.

Additionally, it is very common for melodic lines to drop from the 3 to the b3 or vice versa, which are both contained in the I7 and IV7, respectively.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea