#1
I am guessing that 3nps are good for legato runs. I started learning a Randy Rhoads solo and I think he uses that. Is this mainly used by metal guitarists and shredders?
#2
Those shapes also lend themselves very well to picking runs as it keeps everything consistent across string sets. Patterns can be sequenced across the whole guitar with very little extra learning beyond getting the initial pattern under your fingers.

You'll find that almost every guitarist uses 3nps fingerings at some point because they're a very natural way of arranging scales. They keep everything generally in one position with minimal shifting and have no gaps as you ascend/descend scales unlike 2 note per string fingerings which miss notes and 4 note per string fingerings which require constant and large position shift and, unless your name is Allan Holdsworth, are very hard to play without sliding a lot.

What is the most important thing, really, is that you know the scales well enough that you can make a choice between all these ways of going about things as you need to. Obviously you'll need to practice to gain the physical facility to use them and for that I definitely say stick with 3nps shapes unless you're playing pentatonics or possibly diminished ideas.
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#4
Mark Tremonti mentions 3nps patterns a lot and he picked them up from somebody, but I can't remember who. It was probably somebody like Rusty Cooley, Troy Stetina, MAB, or someone else in what he calls his guitar circle, which are mostly metal players except for a couple.
#5
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Those shapes also lend themselves very well to picking runs as it keeps everything consistent across string sets. Patterns can be sequenced across the whole guitar with very little extra learning beyond getting the initial pattern under your fingers.

You'll find that almost every guitarist uses 3nps fingerings at some point because they're a very natural way of arranging scales. They keep everything generally in one position with minimal shifting and have no gaps as you ascend/descend scales unlike 2 note per string fingerings which miss notes and 4 note per string fingerings which require constant and large position shift and, unless your name is Allan Holdsworth, are very hard to play without sliding a lot.

What is the most important thing, really, is that you know the scales well enough that you can make a choice between all these ways of going about things as you need to. Obviously you'll need to practice to gain the physical facility to use them and for that I definitely say stick with 3nps shapes unless you're playing pentatonics or possibly diminished ideas.


Heh, 4nps is a total bitch but definitely worth some investment in. I'm not that good at it but I do occasionally dabble with it - it makes sense, it's 1 finger per note, but the gap between the middle and ring fingers makes it really hard especially if you want to legato with pull-offs. I guess Allan Holdsworth pulls it off (hey!) because he exclusively uses hammer ons (even where one would normally use a pull off). It's not too bad if you're just using hammers but I find hammering backwards really odd.

Anyway, it's certainly fun to play about with and if you're using standard tuning and just playing a scale, it escalates pretty quickly If you just play A natural minor scale you start at the 5th fret on the low E and end at the 20th on the high E. Maybe 4nps is best for NST... Actually, might try that...
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#6
Quote by sweetdude3000
I am guessing that 3nps are good for legato runs. I started learning a Randy Rhoads solo and I think he uses that. Is this mainly used by metal guitarists and shredders?


They're good for picking too as the right hand pattern is consistent.