#1
it's my first time picking up my old guitar in a few years and i'm fairly rusty,
but I do remember a cool chord transition for picking, although I can't for the life of me think of all of them and this is where I need your help.
I know I've explained it poorly but here it how it goes for a transition to an "Em"

" any chord"
.......................... e:|------
...........................b:|------
...........................g:|------
...........................d:|------
...........................a:|------
...........................e:| -2-3-| "Em"

if you have any idea what im talking about and can help it'd be much appreciated!
thanks
#4
Basically, you are just using a walking bass line to "walk" to your chords. My best advice would be to use your ear.

a hint:

The same pattern on the A string could get you to C major or A minor
#5
I know I'm not doing a good job of explaining myself,
and to be honest jrenkert I'm surprised you understood what I'm trying to get at.
Thanks by the way.
Macabre, it wouldn't get me to a D for example,
I'm only getting back into the swing of things after a fairly long break and I remember it worked well but unfortunately I just don't have the "ear" for this kind of thing. I was just looking for a few outside opinions on it, thanks.
#6
That kind of open chord thing is all over the place, check out "Stairway to Heaven" (i know right?)

another song that walks all up and down that is zeppelin is "Babe, I'm gonna leave you"

both are beginner/intermediate songs

Also maybe listen to some blues or jazz

I teach little kids all day, I've gotten good at deciphering peoples' rambling but thanks
#8
Quote by poc 15k
I know I'm not doing a good job of explaining myself,
and to be honest jrenkert I'm surprised you understood what I'm trying to get at.
Thanks by the way.
Macabre, it wouldn't get me to a D for example,
I'm only getting back into the swing of things after a fairly long break and I remember it worked well but unfortunately I just don't have the "ear" for this kind of thing. I was just looking for a few outside opinions on it, thanks.


A D chord followed by an F# note, a G note, and then an E minor chord doesn't work for you? Because it really should, and so should nearly any other chord. That's why we really can't answer this for you. You're trying to remember one specific chord in a context where nearly any chord will work.
#9
Yeah it all works. We all understand you.

If I remember rightly, Where Did You Sleep Last Night uses that walking pattern very well.
#10
Quote by Nero Galon
Yeah it all works. We all understand you.

If I remember rightly, Where Did You Sleep Last Night uses that walking pattern very well.


I wasn't repeating myself for you. I was repeating myself for the OP that clearly needed it repeated.
#12
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I wasn't repeating myself for you. I was repeating myself for the OP that clearly needed it repeated.


I was agreeing with you, not replying to your post.
#14
On the E string --2--4--
Am or you can extend it back one 0--2--4--Am

Another "transition" that is nice is this little ditty...


e|-------------0---1---3----------|
b|-0---1---3----------------------|
g|--------------------------------|
D|-----------------0---2----------|
A|-----0---2---3------------------|
E|-3------------------------------|

You can use this kind of thing works well. Shorten it appropriately to get to the chord you want.

For example



e|-------------|
b|-0---1---3---|
g|-------------|
D|-------------|
A|-----0---2---| CMajor chord
E|-3-----------|


Variations of this idea are used in Classical Gas (Mason Williams) as well as Blackbird (The Beatles)

I also use it as a kind of turnaround when I play I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry (Hank Williams)

Best of luck
Si
#15
You might be talking about this common progression:

G | D/F# | Em

You would play the D/F# as a normal open string D shape, with your thumb on the E string 2nd fret.
#16
Thanks Tigers, I'll make sure to check them out.
Bondmorkret, is there a general pattern to it or is it like jrenkert said, just use my ear?