#1
How can I learn how to count complex rhytms? Everytime I try to learn from online or something it just goes over the basic note durations.

The main reason I want to learn how to count is to be able to come up with new ideas. I usually just play by feel and come up with licks and runs by manipulating the basic note groupings but I feel if I was able to count it could open more doors.

I am really interested in the fast speedy type of licks, I guess you can call them "burn licks" like in the style of Doug Aldrich.

In 1:00 to 1:05 in this video it sounds like he is just noodling in the scale but it still sounds structured somehow. So I want to learn how to count to come up with those little fast bits by structuring it and not just wanking all over.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpbqCwcyPrU
#2
Well, counting in complex rhythms is fairly simple. Let's say you're in 6/8 (which is a "simple" complex rhythm). You have 3 quarter beats in 6/8. So, tap out 3 quarter beats for every bar.


As for learning how to play fast licks, learn to drill with a metronome. Start off with a speed you're comfortable with. For the sake of an example, let's say that 108bpm is a comfortable speed for you. Learn how to play the lick cleanly at 108bpm (you may even want to play without distortion to make sure you're really playing it cleanly). Then, bump the speed up to 116bpm and get it down cleanly at that speed. Next, bump it up to a speed like 124bpm. Keep doing that until you can play it cleanly at whatever speed you desire. It'll take a lot of discipline, but it's doable.
#3
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Well, counting in complex rhythms is fairly simple. Let's say you're in 6/8 (which is a "simple" complex rhythm). You have 3 quarter beats in 6/8. So, tap out 3 quarter beats for every bar.


As for learning how to play fast licks, learn to drill with a metronome. Start off with a speed you're comfortable with. For the sake of an example, let's say that 108bpm is a comfortable speed for you. Learn how to play the lick cleanly at 108bpm (you may even want to play without distortion to make sure you're really playing it cleanly). Then, bump the speed up to 116bpm and get it down cleanly at that speed. Next, bump it up to a speed like 124bpm. Keep doing that until you can play it cleanly at whatever speed you desire. It'll take a lot of discipline, but it's doable.

You talk all the theory in the modes thread like you know what you're on about, but you know shit all, as is evident here.
#4
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Well, counting in complex rhythms is fairly simple. Let's say you're in 6/8 (which is a "simple" complex rhythm). You have 3 quarter beats in 6/8. So, tap out 3 quarter beats for every bar.

6/8 has two groups of three eighth notes. What you're talking about is 3/4 time.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#5
I do not mean playing in 7/8 or odd times sigs...what I mean is counting complex note groupings in 4/4 time ...you know with ties and a whole mix of notes that take a lot of practice to know how to count and play.

In the clip that I posted...say you were to notate that on paper...wouldn't it look sort of unorthodox?
Last edited by Unreal T at Apr 2, 2013,
#7
Quote by rockingamer2
6/8 has two groups of three eighth notes. What you're talking about is 3/4 time.

If you divide up 6/8 into quarter notes, it has 2 dotted quarter notes. I do admit that I was wrong to say it was 3 quarter notes. We can't be perfect all the time.

Quote by mdc
You talk all the theory in the modes thread like you know what you're on about, but you know shit all, as is evident here.

Are you dull?...One mistake means I don't know shit?

Why do you even care, you moron?


Let's look at 6/8. We have 2 groups of 3 eighth notes. We could also use 2 dotted quarter notes.

And, yes I know I originally said 3 quarter notes. I made a mistake.

Quote by Unreal T
I do not mean playing in 7/8 or odd times sigs...what I mean is counting complex note groupings in 4/4 time ...you know with ties and a whole mix of notes that take a lot of practice to know how to count and play.

In the clip that I posted...say you were to notate that on paper...wouldn't it look sort of unorthodox?

What I said about a metronome still applies, you just have to learn to subdivide beats, as someone else said.

Edit:
Apparently, sweetdude mentioned subdividing the beats. So, learn how to do what he's saying. It's fairly easy. I'm not good with using words for counting, so I just learned to tap my foot.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Apr 2, 2013,
#8
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
If you divide up 6/8 into quarter notes, it has 2 dotted quarter notes. I do admit that I was wrong to say it was 3 quarter notes. We can't be perfect all the time.

'sall good.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#9
  • Step 1: Obtain a metronome
  • Step 2: Construct exercises that have odd note groupings per beat, ie: groups of 5, 7, 9 and 11
  • Step 3: Play these exercises with the metronome, learn the feel
  • Step 4: Once the feel has been obtained, alter your exercises by placing ties on the first and second notes of every group, then 2 and 3, 3 and 4, 4 and 5, etc
  • Step 5: You now have a basic recipe to construct anything else you wish to learn, so do it